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We loved this hike through Zion Canyon! We thought we were arrived after the first meters chain but the true ascension was just beginning! The view really worth the effort! Be sure to have hiking shoes and no dizziness.

Great views. Beginning is a little boring but well worth the trip.

It was truly amazing!

great views!!! A lot of uphill, but had plenty of places to rest and take scenic pics.

pretty easy hike. Very enjoyable.

Hiked this trail 8.8 miles yesterday in mid Nov in upper 60s F in 2018 and it took 5.5 hours round trip with flashlights starting around 1 pm and ending at 630pm. With moon out, Flashlights was a must. I stopped 4 times just to switch shoes and eat a snack twice while changing shoes, and having a small towel to dry feet is highly recommended. I only gave it 2 stars for scenery, BUT I have hiked many incredible places like Zion and the Grand Canyon and Flatiron, Flagstaff, Sedona, and seeing some yellow fall leaves still on the trees along the creek and a few red rocky canyon areas and some wide, knee deep creek areas was nice, but nothing to write home about for me. I also didn’t think it was hard; but did it when cool outside, and I am in great shape, but doing in summer would be much harder. I was a little disappointed in lack of signage, too, but was very grateful for restroom at the parking lot and a few shady trees there. If your dog hates getting wet in freezing cold water, probably not the hike for your dog unless don’t cross any creeks and just hangout along first crossing. Difficult enough to cross this creek 3 times without holding a dog, and wind up at creek again at very end of the trail. There is no signage at parking lot saying trail name, no map either, long walk before see actual sign saying West Clear Creek, then descend to one of the most scenic creek areas right away. The first 2 creek crossing are very close together but if switching shoes like I did, keep wet shoes on till cross creek a third time because 3rd crossing is not real far away either. In my opinion, hike is not worth continuing to very end passed third crossing because just wind up back at same creek and it looks pretty much same as all other creek crossings, and canyon views are just same for most part as well. I was expecting to see a 8 ft or higher waterfall at very end or something more spectacular along the way, or an area to swim or require a tube to float around in for 100 feet but I guess I missed it, unless it was a 12 inch waterfall at the very first river crossing. I am not sure I would consider that a real waterfall, but whatever. I brought tubes, but didn’t see a need to use them and not exactly sure how. Definitely couldn’t use one to cross any creek areas that I could tell. (I would like to compare this hike to Bell Trail and Verde Hot Springs because all nearby Camp Verde, and then figure out which was best. Bell Trail sounds like hiking to a big cliff diving pool. Verde Hot Springs sounds like a flat much shorter hike to a natural hot tub that could require crossing a thigh to waist deep river, depending on which road you take and one road has gate closed from fallen rocks.).

hiking
9 hours ago

Smooth and relatively easy hike on a good sunny day in November. Hiked up with my 3 years old kid on the back - 3 hours loop with a few stops to eat and take pictures.
Very clear path with white marks on the ground.

The absolute most beautiful, breathtaking hike I have ever done in my life! Absolutely recommend hiking Angels Landing!! Don’t let your fear of heights stop you, just do it!

On 11/17/2018, l hiked to the summit. For being mid-november, it was an awesome weather day! There was very little to no wind at the Summit plus it was t-shirt weather. My guess it was a weather fluke (the mountain weather report had predicted strong winds and 8 degree wind chill factor at The Summit)
My advice is to bring crampons, they will be needed! If not, wear ice hockey protection and tie a pillow to your butt haha! but seriously, the ice in the last couple miles is treacherous. Yaktraxs are okay but I recommend Kahtoola Microspikes. They gave me excellent traction on the ice and also on the occasional bare spots. They cost $52+tax at REI and were worth it! Especially going downhill, where most butthurt occurs haha.

this trail is difficult if you have not been to many tough ones before there are some places where you have to use both hands and full body strength to climb if you want to get to the top. but view from the top will not disappoint.

hiking
18 hours ago

Fun hike and great views, Devils Bridge is a must see

Awesome, wear good shoes, bring water!!

Make sure your boots are tied.

...pretty much what everyone else said. Yes, the first mile can be a little much but really only because you’re just getting started. Yes, the last two miles (the traverse) to Long Valley are the most difficult. Yes, the blazes (white dots) that mark the trail can be missed real easily, so definitely get the Pro version if only for this hike. Once you pass 4300’, keep going. If you turn around you’ll walk into a furnace and chances are you’ll hurt yourself more than if you just keep going up.
Take the chance to enjoy the sunrise on the way up. The views are really what make this hike so epic — enjoy them while you’re up there. When you hit the summit, take a look at the cabin but don’t be a douche and trash it. If you have extra food consider leaving it here for other hikers in emergency situations. When you’re done, have a beer. Chances are you’ve never deserved it more.

The rest is all just my technical notes, so don’t read on if you’re not interested.
Do not read the following and think that you can do what I did. It was somewhat stupid, and I’m extremely lucky NOTHING happened on my hike. I am an experienced hiker, but definitely not at such high altitudes. Maybe train a little before this one, it’s a doozy.

Unfortunately, I have a problem stopping once I start. Fortunately, I don’t know how to quit once I start. I started this hike at midnight, but had no intention of going as quickly as I did. I went through 2L of water on the way up. I hit Long Valley Ranger Station at 7:45am. Once I got there I had 3 kid-sized oatmeal bars, and a handful of jerky. I refilled my reservoir to 3L, and stretched a little.
Started towards the peak around 8, but went much slower on the second half. I hit the summit exactly at noon. I took a break in the Peak Shelter where I changed out of some of my layers, and ate some more jerky. I left a few oatmeal bars in the emergency locker...
...started down to the tram around 12:30, and went slowly, again. I ran out of water one mile from the tram, but it was shaded and just knowing I was about to finish kept me going. Hit the tram at 3:30, and then I hit the bar for a beer.

I started the hike in two wool shirts, longjohns, heavy wool socks, zip-off pants, a hoodie, gloves, and a beanie. A headlamp (the brighter the better) is an absolute if you’re hiking at night. I had my rain gear as well as a tarp in case a storm blew in suddenly. Hiking poles are a lifesaver, and maybe invest in some athletic knee braces. A wide hat and sunscreen will be used the second half of the hike and you’ll be glad for them.
I took 12 kid-sizes oatmeal bars, two big bags of jerky, a small bag of jerky, two pro-bars, and a bag of pistachios. I had 3L of half water/half Gatorade and carried two extra bottles of each with me. I seriously only had four of the oatmeal bars and didn’t even finish the small bag of jerky, but I’m glad I had more than enough in case it was needed. I killed the drinks, and wish I had taken just one extra water bottle.

If you read this far, nice. Again, don’t do what I did. Take it slow-ish. Stop every once in a while to rest your legs, and eat a little. Take goo with you if you’re like me and have a hard time eating solids while hiking. Refill at the ranger station, and use your common sense. If you get to Long Valley and you’re tired, or hurting, take the tram. It’s an awesome hike, but it’s not awesome enough to hurt yourself or risk others safety saving you.

Not an avid hiker but in good shape. This hike is no joke. Started at 2am and it was such a blessing finally seeing the ranger station after the continuous vertical slope. Did this without poles and that’s the one thing I regret not using. Bring lots or water and gel packs. Started cramping on the last vertical stretch before the ranger station. I wouldn’t recommend doing this hike unless you have trained for it. I won’t be doing this hike again for a long time!

Nice hike, and a pretty decent workout for how short it is. Some pretty views and some fun steep sections.
A bit crowded on a Saturday morning and the parking situation was a mess. $5 fee to park and too confusing to figure out if a National Park covers it based on the signs, so I just paid.

I did this with two friends on October 26, 2018. We are all in our mid thirties. It was a bluebird day with not a cloud in the sky, and I think it was probably averaged around 40-45 degrees for the entire day. The summit was above freezing for sure when we summited at noon.

Timing:
We stayed at the Comfort Inn in Lone Pine the night before and the night after the hike. We got on the trail at 3 a.m. and summited right around noon. We started our decent at 1 p.m. and got back to the trailhead at 8 p.m. So that’s 9 hours up and 7 hours down.

Dealing with Altitude:
I live in Salt Lake City, so I have access to some elevation and did a bunch of training hikes to 11,000 feet on the weekends to get used to the altitude. The two other guys live at sea level but did their best to hike as much as they could before our attempt. We all ended up getting prescriptions for acetazolamide and starting cycling on that and 400-600 milligrams of ibuprofen every six hours starting about 12 hours before we started out. For two of us, we really had no symptoms of altitude sickness beyond very mild headaches at the top. The other guy got a pretty decent headache that subsided during our decent.

Food:
I think we all ate much less food than I thought we would. I ate two sleeves of Clif Bar Shot Bloks and took a caffeine pill on the way up (which might have contributed to an upset stomach). And I also ate 4-5 Clif Bars, some beef jerky, a pretty good-sized bag of gummy bears, and some nuts. I brought I peanut butter and jelly sandwich that I never even ate, but the other two guys ate their PB & J at the summit.

Water:
I brought four liters of liquid with me. Three liters of water and one liter of Gatorade. My doctor told me to drink a sports drink with the acetazolamide. I ended up drinking 2 liters of the water and the Gatorade and gave the rest of the water to my hiking buddies on the way down. We actually got back to the parking lot with nothing to drink between us all, which is probably not the smartest play. I did bring a filter with me though just in case things got real out there.

Gear:
We all used adjustable hiking poles. We have backup batteries for our headlamps since a good amount of the hike was in the dark. Sun lotion. I had a wide-brimmed hat for the sun. I had four layers on the top and three on my legs and was overdressed for most of the day. I was prepared for the day to be 10 degrees colder than it was. We all had microspikes, but I think I was the only one who used them.

Overall:
The 99 switchbacks might get you down, but once you top out after those, you are pretty golden. That where the trail gets super interesting and the views are ridiculous. The only thing I might do different if I did this again was to try to move a bit faster to get down before dark since spirits were running low for the last couple miles of the decent. Reach out to me if you have any questions about the hike. I’d be happy to talk about it.

Get there before 8 to have a relaxing hike up. If you get there late you may be sharing the trail with a lot kids, screaming tourists, dogs, and many other inconsiderate people that come with popular hikes. Fun little morning scramble though and the views are well worth it.

Super fun hike. We felt safe with the chain just make sure you make smart moves and you will enjoy it much more than worrying about falling off the cliff.
Make sure to take breaks because the whole thing is very strenuous.

If you can break this up into two days do it. We day hiked it, left at 2am and back by 6pm. Super long day. Camped at Alabama Hills on the way out.

hiking
2 days ago

Not too long and very do-able! It was quite steep and tested your nerves right near the top where the bridge is, lots of steep steps.

I went with a group of 20-32 yr olds The young adults were my children’s age so you can do the math . Thank goodness I have been training in yoga and Pilates . This hike was challenging . Uneven stepping along the entire trail with the last 30 min , a constant climb up . I feel this trail was more than just moderate . We had a blast ! My group expressed how scared they were at the end when we got back to the van . I thought everyone was cool while hiking so ,I was also . The less you know the better . . I did get a photo of me out on devils bridge . Some of our group did also but not all. But they finished the hike and were thrilled in the end . SUCCESS!!

Beautiful and serene with expansive views. Moderately difficult, but nothing the average hiker couldn’t tackle. Can get a little slippery at parts so wear proper footwear. Vey well maintained trail that doesn’t take to long to complete. Gets a little strenuous towards the midway to ending of the trail which will be marked, so watch of out the descent and accent back up as it’s not a loop trial. Overall one of the more beautiful hikes you will take in the valley.

hiking
2 days ago

It’s an amazing hike. I could have hiked this in five hours flat easy !!!! Unfortunately ran into a bunch of ice pass the tree-line which slowed me up considerably. Bring crampons if you decide to hike this in the winter. I busted my ass a dozen times lol. Bring ample amount of water at least 2.5 liters.
~Things you need ~

1. A backpack

Best hike I've ever done

hiking
3 days ago

for the younger folks: You will do fine if you are in good shape.

for older folks: bring a pole. it will come in handy on return trip when your legs are a little tired and you need to get over the high steps.

Not an easy hike unless you are used to this altitude and do this on a regular basis. also i recommend getting an early start (8am). for two reasons. one is for parking which gets full quick especially on weekends and two because the sun is on you the entire way up. its a bit chilly with early start so u will need a sweater.

Beautiful hike! Amazing views

Nice way to test your mind, have fun!

This hike is very challenging but well worth it to see the spectacular views! Not meant for shoes that have no grip.

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