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Beautiful and very challenging hike. Contrary to what the listing notes, this is a better point to point hike than an out and back. I would recommend doing it as a day hike over backpacking after doing it both ways.

Did this trail yesterday. Fall colors are terrific. Stopped at Bond cliff as we had to do it as an out and back in a day. It may seem long but there are long sections that are very flat (heading in toward Zealand hut and back out) West Bond was my favorite view point. Not a lot of folks on the trail.

Did the single day point-to-point with 2 staged cars. The weather and wind is no joke, even if all seems calm at the trailhead. Beautiful views, especially along Monticello’s lawn. Perfect time to do it, first weekend of August. Started at 5am.

Just completed a single day Presi Traverse with my brother in law. we are moderate hikers who do one bigger backpacking trip each August. we started at Appalachia trailhead @ 4:15am and took valley way up to Madison hut. At 6:15 we dropped our day packs and did the out and back to Mt Madison. we tagged Adams & Jefferson before stopping for lunch at Washington at about 11:15. we took a much needed 75 min lunch break and leg rest and we're back on the trail by 1230. we skipped Franklin but tagged Monroe, Eisenhower Pierce before finally exiting the forest at 5:50pm. great, but difficult day!

I’ve only started hiking 2 months ago, about 2-3 times a week and I decided to give this a shot. I was originally going to do the first half of Devil’s path because I wasn’t sure how my body was going to handle it. It took me 7 hours and 12 miles with short breaks on every mountain and random scenic view spots to take pictures according to my AllTrails application which is very accurate by the way. Following AllTrails I hit several mountains starting with indian head, twin south, twin, sugarloaf (which has a herd path to the view point) and Plateau- the one that destroyed my lower back. I got a treat on Plateau, I actually saw a 1-2 year old black bear. As soon as he saw me coming down the mountain he ran up real fast and looked at me from the top. He seem scared.. anyways, I tried to make a video but he was too quick and eventually disappeared. Once I got to my car in Notch Road parking lot, I paid my 6 dollar fee at the rangers office, freshened up and miraculously I still felt capable of pushing a little more. I got my water and poured water on my head to wake up. I jumped back on the trail to hunter mountain. I hiked all the way up to the fire tower which has a very beautiful view. It’s very cold up there btw. I could’ve continued all the way to the end of the trail over west kill mountain but I would be stranded without a car so I just decided to go to the fire tower and return back. I did a total of 20 miles and climbed 6 mountains, I believe about 6-7k in elevation gain. My legs felt great but it was my lower back that was screaming for rest. I have 3 herniated discs and the weight of water and not resting my back for over 12 hours hiking took a hit. That’s my only pain. For the first half, i drank a liter of water, i ate one orange, one apple and half of snack bar. For the second half hunter mountain, I drank 2 water bottles, I ate one orange, one apple, other half of snack bar, 2 slices of white bread and chugged a can of Pepsi for sugar rush. I had an amazing time. Btw, this trail should be rated EXTRA HARD. It is very steep and rocky. Especially, Plateau and hunter.

Once in a lifetime experience! I dedinitely would NOT do it again. It was a great experience & I felt triumphant when I finally came down painfully rocky St. Anne & into West Kill Rd. But finishing the first half w/ Misery was painful, & once done, you realize how appropriately name that path is. To finish Devil's Path, starting day-2 with Hunter was, w/ sharp 2.5-miles of elevation, was no picnic.
You'd have to really, really want to so this to finish the whole thing. I recommend, (1) good shoes, if your boots are pinching you even walking 1 mile, get another pair, (2) keep pack light, (3) bag w/ 1L bladder, avoid anything you have to take out of bag or side pockets, wasted energy. (4) opt for light lunch, ex: PB&J, or half a wrap & avoid feeling full, (5) snacking w/ "fruity" fruits such apple, peach, plums, etc. I personally avoided bananas on the trails but had a bunch at camp grounds. (6) blister care & atheletes tape. (7) Opt for headlamp instead of handheld flashlight. (8) Don't do this path solo. I saw some injuries on the path requiring med assist, it takes over an hr to get the 1st trooper w/o equipment up there, then you get to wait 3, 4, 6 hrs for the equipment guys, the operation is very detailed & lengthy. You don't want to get injured & be alone.
Know the bail-out points that don't require you to take the same treacherous paths back to the beginning. If you really want to finish, minimize your excuses & put your 1st bail-out further on your day's goal. For ex, if yoir goal for day1 is 13 miles, set bail-out at mile 8 or 9. Your heart will drive you to the end once your that far along. But if at 5, it's gping to be hard to be convinced it's "a little bit more."

There was bail-out point on both days (let me add, some die hard hikers do the 25 mile in 1 day. I consider myself quite fit, but could not). Day 1, bail-out was 9.5 miles in. If you can do 9mi, even if your body says, not another step, chances are, your heart will push you to the remaining 4 miles. But the reality is, it is painful, even for the best. So, if you get to 9, you can do it.
Day 2, the bail-out point is apprx. 4 miles in. If you can convince yourself, you need to finish this, you will do it! the reason I know this, is b/c there's no escape in this 7 mile portion of the trek. The elevation to Hunter is so brutal, no one's coming up there to pick you up 1-2-3, unless you want to wait till midnight for parks troopers to come for you.
THE BATTLE IS WON (OR LOST) IN YHR MIND. Sounds cliché, but true. I really enjoyed having my guide around, especially when I could not hide the pain (1st my knee, then the blister in my shoes). But him talking to me & trying to push me onward was taking a toll on my energy level & ability to focus ahead. This may not be the case for everyone... find "your thing." My trick was to keep back from the pack just 2 mins to be able to focus, w/o the talking around me & the sounds of boots & hiking poles. I had another lady behind me who had developed some painful toe blister & had to take it slow & I was trekked along gingerly. I was genuinely worried about her & pause every now & then to make sure she could still see me, but at some point I stopped looking back & just focussed on, literally, the next step ahead of me, not 5 ft, not 10 ft.

It's a great experience. It's in moments of little triumphs that we realize how the heart can push one onward, even when the body doesn't think it can go on another step. I loved the experience but would not do it again! It was like bungee jumping... woooooo! I'm over it!

Good luck!

Certainly lives up to it’s name . It’s challenging with steep ascents , Sharp descents and a lots of slippery rocks to go over .
We parked our car at Prediger rd parking lot and had arrangements to be driven to the western end where we started from the devil’s tomb campground . It took us about 8 1/2 hours to reach back to our car fully exhausted .
Physically demanding , requires some skill but a great Hike !
PS: Wont recommend to attempt it during or even after a rainfall , the rock scrambling could be quite a hurdle

Acadia's Park Loop Road is the perfect introduction to this 47,000 acre park. Much of it is one-way traffic.

road biking
2 months ago

This is a road biker paradise.. Parked @Sand Beach lot... Began the 22 mile loop there @8am... It has it all, scenery, well paved roads, some challenging hills... About 17 miles of the loop is a 2 lane one way traffic so plenty of room to bike...you also have the option of adding Cadillac mountain summit (extra 5.5 miles), very challenging, all uphill and the downhill can be treacherous, too many tight turns and you'll be slamming on your brakes all the way down with a huge intersection at the bottom.... All said, at least the loop is a must.

very easy. great scenery.

My husband and I hiked the loop with our dog, camping overnight at Jimmy Dolan Notch. There's been a lot of rain this month, so there was water everywhere, little creeks and waterfalls. We came up via the eastern leg of the loop. It started off fairly easy, but turned into one of the tougher hikes we've done. Several spots where our dog couldn't make the jumps (he's got stubby little legs), and we had to ferry him up the rocks or carry him up balanced on one knee as we pulled ourselves up with tree roots. Not easy with our packs on. Between the challenge of the dog and the fact that our camp stove crapped out on us, we had to call our trip a little short, and we just hiked back down the next morning via the western leg. The descent was easier, the elevation change was definitely steadier on the western side of the loop.

Overall, this was a gorgeous, well-marked hike, and we fully intend to come back (without the doggo) and try it again. Challenging, beautiful, and well worth the drive from NYC.

With overnight gear, this is a trek. Don’t pay attention to the mile markers on the trail - use your gps. Plenty of mis cues. Be prepared for serious ascents and technical descents. Kind of a blast but a mother ef for sure.

Hiked Suagloaf, Plateau, and some of Twin last year. If you're looking for a challenge, I would definitely recommend hiking these mountains. Did it as a day hike and I was there for a good 6-7 hours. I know everyone's skill level is different but this one really pushed my limits.
Be prepared to do some dangerous rock scrambles, which are made even more difficult when wet. And to possibly be very sore the next day,

We did this trail North to South with three nights used camping outdoors below the treeline. If you're coming down from Canada, or from far away, starting at the North and using the free camping site not too far from Mt Madison is a good option. You will suffer the first day regardless getting up past the treeline into the mountain range but it will be worth it.

Q: Which mountains should I do?
A: Is it extremely cloudy? Then you should just stay to the path. If not then Mt Madison has the best overall view of the North to South range and you can even see Mt Washington on a good day. Mt Adams is a pile of rocks (I would skip), Mt Jefferson is a yes on a clear day, Mt Clay is a nice windy spot to relax before you climb up Mt Washington, anything past Mt Washington is really dependent on how quickly you need to get back to a shuttle/car (Eisenhower has a pile of rocks on top... up to you).

You cannot reserve a shuttle seat the day of. You must book in advance or wait around in line to be sure to get a spot. Do not rely on taxi services as they are far and few.

Gearwise you should expect wind, rain and sun with the change dependent on the time of the year you go. If you are hiking in the summer expect a neckburn if you don't wear sunscreen or a hat during the peak sun hours. There are streams that I would risk not filtering before drinking but there are larger stretches after Mt Washington that have still water that need more than just tablets to make it consumable. Hiking poles are not needed but shoes with proper ankle support are. You will be on very rocky terrain once you're above the treeline and you could easily roll or strain something without proper footwear.

Please double layer socks in your shoes. Blisters out here will suck. Thin layer first then a thick wool sock so that you don't have as much friction with your shoes leading to blisters.

The cabins take credit cards. If you want to stay in them go for it but you aren't exactly roughing it. Sometimes if you arrive there off usually eating times they'll have free food to eat or coffee to drink. They also will let you fill up on water there.

Parking is 5USD a day at the centre (South). I would recommend dropping people off at the North trailhead, driving to the centre/parking and then taking the shuttle to regroup. This will allow you to come out of the trail right beside the parking lot on your last day.

It was fine except that when your finished your legs are KILLING you

Our group of 4, Nav, Jimmy, Ragz, and me (Rich) had a blast. 2 day trip, 20 mi. The Appalacia lot start at 4.30 am to beat the afternoon rain paid off. Madison by 8am, Leftover pancakes at Madison hut and a bathroom! Adams by 9.30, Lunch at 10.45, Jefferson by 12.30, Washington by 2pm, and at the LOC hut by 3 as it started to rain.
I do not prefer poles ever. My partners do, but there is rocks, boulders, and more rocks so use rubber tips on your poles. There is a lot of hand over hand climbing over boulders where you will have to tuck away your poles.
Adams was the toughest climb. And we made good speed on the Gulfside trail near the cog.
LoC hut is fabulous, great food and comfort, and i bought my new favorite t-shirt. I used mycoal x-large hand warmers to dry out my boots overnight. Coffee and breakfast is ready at 7, i wish it was earlier. They have a new septic system this year that filters human waste very well, so the water you drink today is someone's pee from yesterday! no joke. The hutsmen and hutswomen are super, tip them a $10 or even more. They like $20, as you will find out from Jack and Rose.
Monroe, Eisenhower and Peirce is a walk in the park compared to day1, lots of downhill, back to the Highland Center. Enjoy a beer and dinner when you get there. I will do the Presi again someday.
-Rich

Tough as nails. Do not underestimate.

Parked the car at Devil's Tombstone Campground where Smiley's Taxi awaited to take us to the trailhead at Prediger Road. The plan was to do Indian Head, Twin, Sugarloaf, and Plateau.

Started at 8 am and hit Indian Head first. Everyone said it would be the hardest, but this is incorrect. Read on. The ascent was challenging with several steep sections that required abandoning hiking poles and scrambling on hands and feet. Several breathtaking views await. Descent is moderate.

Next up was Twin mountain. The ascent was shorter than Indian Head's but felt more strenuous in some sections. You will hit the first (lowest) summit of Twin to great views. It's an easy hike to the second, true summit of Twin, good views here as well. The descent from Twin is pretty steep. Kind of an ass kicker. Good footwork is essential here.

Sugarloaf is next. Very steep ascent, where I saw several people I had been bumping into on previous summits start to show signs of exhaustion. The summit is short and nothing to write home about. The descent is pretty steep and will test many. I met groups at the bottom of Sugarloaf that had members call it quits here.

Without a doubt, Plateau is the true test of anyone attempting this hike. Take advantage of the "spring" during the approach to refill water bottles or refresh yourself. The ascent itself is very very challenging, perhaps even more so since it'll be the fourth and last mountain of the day. By the time I reached the summit, which is not memorable at all save for the feeling of relief, I was completely gassed out. Enjoy the flat hiking atop Plateau (~2.2 mi) and get ready for the descent down to campground, which is steep and seems endless.

All in all, a great day and a very enjoyable challenge.

I don't really even know where to start with this review - the Presidential Traverse is one of the most personally fulfilling, yet physically taxing, treks in New Hampshire, New England, and perhaps the country. Offering some of the most expansive views in the East, this trail saddles along some of the White Mountains' tallest peaks and consistently stays above tree-line. If you're considering doing this, you're in for an adventure - but some things to be aware of (in addition to what Dane wrote below):

1. Physical Demand. If you summit every mountain along the way, your trip will yield a total elevation gain of nearly 10,000 vertical feet. This is roughly 1/3 the height of Everest over the course of one-to-two days. Combined between these gains and the significant long-distance mileage, this traverse easily ranks as very strenuous and should not be attempted -- especially in one day -- unless you're in proper physical shape. It was a hell of a workout, but if I could do it again, I'd split it into two days. Bring tons of water, sport drinks, and high-calorie snacks and take frequent breaks.

2. Equipment, Attire, and Weather. You'll be above treeline for the grand majority of this trip. While this offers the chance to take-in some incredible views, it also exposes you to the elements -- often with no easy cover. The weather in the Whites is very unpredictable, and it's important to be prepared for anything, even in the summer. Bring rain attire, thermal layers, gloves, and sunscreen. If weather looks like it's going to turn sour, get under treeline or to shelter. Hiking poles and solid footware are highly recommended, as this trail is very rocky and it's easy to trip/fall.

3. Transportation. Read the review below. If you have multiple cars available, have one parked near AMC Highland Center @ Crawford Notch (end point -- Crawford Connector Trail has a parking lot and is a good option) and then have one bring you to Appalacia, where you can start (Valley Way Trail is my recommendation). If traveling solo, park at Crawford and have a service drive you to Appalacia so you end at your car. As Dane mentioned below, Bill is the man and couldn't have been more thankful for picking me up in the early hours of my day ($100+tip). I started at 2:15a and finished somewhere around 6p.

The trail is very well-traveled and marked. Make sure you have a map before starting, and have evac routes planned in case you need them. Enjoy the ride -- the day I went ended up being clear and, for the first time ever in the Whites, without wind or precipitation (despite how it looked early on). Can't recommend this trail enough.

Great trail. The first half is one of the tuffest trails ive hiked. Be ready because there is no ridge line. You have to hike up and down ever single mountain. But the shelters are well kept and adaquitly spread apart.

on Acadia Park Loop Road

3 months ago

We did not hike the entire 24.5 miles, but this is as majestic a place as any.

* Full Trail Journal now up at packandpeak.com

Completed this on 7/7/18 . If you’re going solo I highly suggest scheduling a shuttle to pick you up at the Webster/Jackson trailhead and then dropping you at the Valley Way trailhead so you end at your car because you can’t guarantee when you’re going to finish and you don't want to hike 15 miles back to your car if you can't get a ride. Trail Angels is one of them but if they're booked, the AMC will give you some numbers for individuals that shuttle people. They gave me the number for a great guy named Bill and he met me a little before 3:00 am at Webster/Jackson and dropped me at the Valley Way trailhead at 3:25 am. I started solo at 3:35 am and joined a group of 3 about 2 miles up Valley Way trail - Todd, Garret, and Jeff. We finished at 7:30 pm for a total of about 16 hours including all our stops. We stuck together until the end, picking up a few others along the way. We hit 10 peaks - Madison, Adams, Jefferson, Washington, Monroe, Franklin, Eisenhower, Pierce, Jackson and Webster. We stopped at all the huts to refill water, grab some snacks, and rest. Spent about half an hour to 45 minutes at Washington. A couple of us brought an extra shirt and pair of socks and changed at Mount Washington. We got lucky with clear skies and 60’s most of the day. Bring sunscreen, eat a lot of carbs and some sodium along the way, sunglasses, bring cash to buy snacks at the huts because you’ll need them, bring layers – we started in fleece and shell and rotated those layers throughout the day due to windchill. BRING GLOVES - We had 45 MPH winds at Madison and that will take the blood out of your fingers real quick. Pace yourself up Valley Way because you’re going to need everything your legs have to get up to Washington. Just ask the folks in line if you can just touch the rock pile at the summit of Washington if you don’t want to take a picture and wait in line. The descent down Webster Cliff and Webster Jackson trails have a lot of big rocks you’ll be crab walking down. The last few miles require a lot of focus to end this hike so pay attention to where your feet are landing. It’s a long, hard hike, but if you prepare right then it’s also an absolutely amazing and unforgettable experience.

Hoping to hit that Pemi Loop Next

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Full Trail Journal now up at packandpeak.com

*One of the guys in our group had his boots completely fall apart up Valley Way and the only other option was a pair of Teva velcro strap water sandals. He strapped them on over some socks at Madison Hut and wore them the rest of the day. If you’ve hiked in New Hampshire you know this is no easy feat (bad pun intended). I couldn’t believe it. He didn’t stump a toe or get soaked through the mud. Jeff is a legend in my book. Text me if you need the number for a shuttle 3-two-1 7-nine-5 533-nine

My wife and 2 pre teens hiked from the AMC Highlands Center to Lakes with plans to continue to Madison the following day. The hike from the Highland Center to Pierce was very hot and humid before reaching the ridge (the temps were supposedly record highs in the Whites). Once on the ridge it cooled a bit, but there wasn’t much of a breeze until we reached the top of Eisenhower. All along the ridge the views were fantastic. We planned on going around Monroe (low on water), but when we arrived at the loop cut off we learned the trail skirting Monroe was closed for maintenance and we needed to take the loop trail. My wife and I shrugged our shoulders, but the kids were happy to bag another peak. The trail over Monroe was strenuous with a lot of bouldering, it was fun and we were happy we did it. We enjoyed our first stay at the Lakes of the Clouds Hut and met nice and interesting people. The next day we continued up in the clouds to Mount Washington with cooler temps in just under an hour and a half. At the summit, I checked the weather forecast for the rest of the day which called for probable severe thunderstorms, heavy rain and sustained 40 mile winds that afternoon on the northern ridge. We decided to continue and head directly for Madison without doing any of the other summits. When we started down Washington I noticed the winds had picked up significantly and decided to save the Northern Presidents for another day. We took the Shuttle down to Pinkham. Once there we had to find a ride to our car at Appalachia and I asked one of the AMC employees if they knew anyone who could give us a lift and they found us someone. All of us had a great time and plan to complete the Northern peaks by the end of the summer.

Did 1/2 a Presi today starting up Valley Way and ending at Washington. Took 7 hours 45 mins. We mistakenly did the Watson Path up Madison because we thought it would save time, but we learned it would have made more sense to continue up Valley Way and just backtrack to the summit. I was glad I had a small day pack, as I imagine a larger and heavier bag would have made it much more difficult. I brought 4L of water and refilled it at Madison hut, and that was enough for a warm summer day. Getting to Washington after all the tough miles before and seeing tourists with their coffee and blue jeans was a little disheartening, and we could hear the auto road for the last 3ish hours of the day. Despite this, the views were incredible and once we got into the alpine zone, the going got significantly easier (than when we were headed up Madison.

How do you get there for nyc on public transportation?

Did this last Friday! Was very difficult but well worth the struggle. Washington was the killer... spent a bit to much energy during the start which was around 450am (Madison, Adams & Jefferson). Eisenhower was the only other significant elevation after Washington.

backpacking
4 months ago

Amazing hike. Highly recommend you have trekking poles or you will be at a disadvantage. The poles are key. Also bring enough food for yourself, there’s huts along the way that you can fuel up at. Overall amazing experience.

We only did Indian Head and Twin Mountain, but the trail certainly lived up to its name. It was a very difficult climb that left us exhausted by the end. The trail had several challenging sections throughout, but rewarded you with a spectacular view at the top of Twin. One of the best views we’ve ever seen in the Catskills and definitely worth the visit.

This time of year hosted a ridiculous amount of flies and mosquitos which pestered us throughout the whole hike. Fortunately, we met some people at the beginning of the trail who had the forethought to bring bug spray and offered us some. Definitely bring some, or you will regret it.

I, unfortunately, could only manage to do half of this. I made the mistake of summiting Madison via the Watson Path to avoid the out-and-back via Valley Way. It was 1,000ft elevation of tough scramble in pea soup. Once the fog started burning off in the afternoon I was greeted with fantastic views of the range. Now that I'm more aware of the terrain, I will be back to hopefully 1-day this next year.

This is a great hike but really lives up to the name Devils Path. We did this as a day (as I do not like to camp) and it took over 9 hours to complete. It was without a doubt the most challenging hike I have ever done. Steep climbs and some challenging terrain on a hot August day was a bit intense.

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