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Great hike yesterday. 4AM start. Two goats at the top. No clouds or wind. I think they should resurrect that pile of rocks on the top to make it higher than Elbert again!

Maybe my new favorite 14er. Really gorgeous, especially for a 14er. Not as much traffic as a lot of popular peaks either. Highly recommend early start, if for no other reason so you can see the sun rise above the Mosquito Range to the East. Also recommend a camp at Elbert Creek Campground the night before. Top notch campsites and just around the corner. And folks, please: STOP starting 14er climbs too late in the morning. Lightning is a real threat with late starts so get on the trail early.

hiking
2 days ago

We did a portion of this hike as a day trip, starting at the trail head and turning around at the camp site near the large waterfall, about six miles from the trail head. We were walking on a weekday in July and only saw a handful of other people all day (two small groups of backpackers on their way up in the afternoon as we were coming down). Despite the dry weather, there was still some flowing water in most, but not all of the side drainages, which came in handy to refill our filtered water bottles. Note that the road between the rest room/parking area and the trailhead was doable with a garden variety small SUV, but lower clearance cars would struggle, in my opinion. The entire hike is amazingly beautiful, from the stunning rock formations to the stands of aspen to the meadows. Can’t wait to come back here and go for the pass next time!

We hiked this se trail on our descent after hiking up the steeper sw trail.
This trail was a dream.

Did partial of this trail catching it at 290 and hiking up and over to 273 intersection. It was the day after a heavy rain so the trail was a bit washed out and definitely moderate steep. Views from the high point back towards Tin Cup Pass beautiful. And the hike down to 273 easily trail run-able. Great time w/ my 78 year old dad!

Loved it. First fourteener and I liked the long approach, seemed a steady incline. With beautiful alpine meadow views. Brought the dogs and they did great, water on the ct section. Only at the scramble portion at the very top did I feel the need to keep them out of people’s way for safety.

mountain biking
5 days ago

This trail is accurately rated “hard.” You start with a 14ish mile, steeeeeep in places, climb up a gravel to dirt road. It is hard. As you ascend, the views are absolutely stunning. I recommend taking your shoes off to cross the pretty little creek! By the time we got to the trail, we were totally exhausted. I am a strong intermediate rider and I was ready to throw my bike off the mountain! The 5 mile DH has sections that are fast, fun, and flowy and more amazing views. There are also sections that are the hardest and most technical that I know of. A lot of the DH was treacherous and very hard! Long travel bikes and years of experience are recommended. Overall, this trail could possibly be fun if there were a shuttle up.

Excellent hike that takes you through pine forest, sub-alpine shrubs, and an amazing ascent up the massive granite field (which is full of marmots and pikas). Views are phenomenal, especially at the very top. Bring lots of water and food to stay energized.

Backpacked 5 miles into the trail. The first mile or so is burn scar, but after that is exquisite. I've never seen more beautiful scenery anywhere. Plenty of good campgrounds and water sources.

*closure!* came across road closure signs a few miles before the TH, however they were only blocking one lane so we continued on. Got to the TH at 930 and were told by road construction that the road/hike is not open to the public, only certain resorts. However they did end up letting us in.
The trail was well-maintained and easy to follow, other than the last mile which was a scramble over rocks. Lots of wildflowers and great views the entire way up! Had the mountain to ourselves the whole time. Clocked 9mi total.

Quite difficult, but worth it when you get to the top. Bring warm clothes!

mountain biking
11 days ago

Wow, interesting trail. It is a 14 mile climb. All on some form of road. I could kill this thing on my gravel bike but riding an 140 mm travel bike up the road for that long is quite exhausting. Not physically as much as mentally. It is beautiful, it has great views. Once the downhill starts it’s a little tricky to find your way at first but not a big deal. Then you come to the middle section of the downhill which is incredibly smooth and ultra fast. You can jump from turn to turn. It is absolute just pure fun. Probably one of my favorite sections of trail. Then you come to the third part. It is super technical. I do not advise it for anybody that is not truly and accomplished bike rider. I did it with no problem on my longer travel bike but my wife had quite a bit of issues on her hundred millimeter bike. I don’t think that the trail is really worth the climb. It would be a really fun shuttle trail. With that said, most rides in Colorado are this way so take that for what you will.

I haven't climbed Mt. Yale yet. I just wanted to thank Shubham for his review. That's one of the best trip reports I've seen in a long time.

Very tame trail up until the end. Slightly rocky near the top(predictably). The trail split is very well marked and it’s easy to tell where to go without any kind of map. The view was great. I wouldn’t say it is as challenging/rewarding as Elbert but that’s why you hit both while you’re in Leadville

This trail would be a 5 in Illinois, for instance, but in Colorado, there are much better options. Beautiful aspen groves and a few scenic overlooks, but too many campers. No wildlife. The northern leg of the route is a 4WD track and you will have to move over for trucks etc. Highly recommend the short loop at the northwest end of the trail, where you can find the longest beaver dam any of us had ever seen. Would have rated this as moderately trafficked, and definitely on the easy side of moderate.

Beautiful trail, would absolutely recommend! Lots of wildflowers, cute marmots and different landscapes on the way. But, this took much longer than I anticipated, and I’m a speedy hiker. Started my ascent at 6:50 and summited at 11:10, with a couple generous breaks on the way up. Stayed up there for about an hour and then got back to the car at 3:20. Went on a Friday and if you can make it on a weekday it is so worth it. Only saw about 20 people total the whole day and didn’t see anyone on my descent—so peaceful. Also definitely go all the way and don’t just stop at the false summit!—it’s not that far off!

Also, if you are feeling ambitious, camp over the weekend and do Elbert and Massive on back-to-back days. There is a ton of camping space along the dirt road that connects the trailheads (as well as on the Colorado trail that starts out Mt. Massive it seems), would make for a great few days.

Our backpacking trip went counterclockwise, starting at Goose Creek, forking left onto McCurdy, left again at Lake Park, and final left at Hawkins Pass. Around 24 miles total.

Goose Creek trail was cool; there is a diverse landscape varying from mountain views to aspen groves to large rock formations. Plenty of water from mile 1 though 6 along this route for the backpackers. Can’t speak to further sections, as we created a loop with McCurdy.

We continued our trek that day into McCurdy (junction at about 6 miles into Goose Creek). McCurdy is tough, required lots of breaks for us as we are relatively new to backpacking and carrying +/-30lb packs. Decent water sources from the Goose Creek / McCurdy junction — for us, we filled up around our mile 8, mile 9 (cave / stream area), and close to mile 10.

All water sources are low, keep in mind we had a low snowpack this year, therefore streams and cave water are lower than normal. Related to this, there are fire restrictions in the area! Always a best practice during a hot and dry summer to NOT start an open fire. Bring fuel and a personal stove to cook. Don’t be that guy, the one who starts a completely preventable forest fire.

Had the best time hiking this today! This was my tenth fourteener and probably has been my favorite so far. Not super hard and the trail was very well defined and easy to follow. Views were some of the prettiest I have seen! It also isn’t as popular as Elbert which I did last summer so it was nice not having the trail be super crowded. Saw some mountain goats as well. 10/10 recommend!

Was awesome!! Done 11 and this was my favorite.

The trail is mixed grade inclines and declines, with 3 very steep sections, the rest were gradual. Some nice views along the way, varying from mountains, valleys, waterfall (extra 3 miles off the trail), and aspen groves. Great camping spots 6.5 and 15 miles in for backpacking. Trail was well marked, plenty of water sources after the first 6 miles.

This is a great trail for a hard but not too technical climb of a 14er..long enough to make it difficult and some fun but not crazy scrambling and route finding to get up to the summit ridge. The parking can be a challenge due to the Mt Elbert trailhead close by so arrive before 6am to give yourself enough time. Also lots of varied terrain from the CO trail at start to the high meadow with wild flowers. Superb views from the top. There was a fair amount of traffic on the trail this Saturday but not at all overcrowded.

Great views and a lovely hike! From the parking lot it’s about 14.8 miles, and it took us about 7 hours. Definitely start early!

Epic hike and epic views 10/10!

Only giving 2 stars, because the guide information was wrong. It is a 20 mile loop (according to my GPS), not 15.9, so a bit on the strenuous side. Probably would’ve made it a backpacking trip instead if the information was correct. Very long day hike, but very beautiful and worth it.

Good conditions, but some erosion on the trail. Easy to follow.

The loop as a whole was a decent hike with some spectacular sections along the way. We did this in 3 days and 2 nights with very little planning because it was our plan B.

Day one (6.5 mi): Hiked up to Brown's Lake, stopping at the waterfall on the way. The waterfall was definitely the highlight of the day although the lake and valley between the towering mountains came in a close second. The mosquitos were absolutely terrible.

Day two(7 mi): We hiked up to the pass where you have the option to hike one more mile and 1,000 more feet to the top of Mt Antero. The hike up to this point is pretty brutal in some spots. Most of the hiking around this area is done on roads shared with 4-wheelers and jeeps, hence the 4 stars. We finished off the day by hiking down to a camping spot near the creek.

Day 3 (3.5 mi): Very easy and nice hike out for the final day. Pleasant single track that made the final day enjoyable.

The most amazing time I had, I have never climbed any mountain in my life. This was the first one. Despite of all the warning which fellow AllTrailers were giving. I became ignorant and took my body very lightheartedly. It was hell experience. Let me explain my amateur climb to the summit.

I wanted to challenge myself to complete the trail at any cost (even if I get hurt). So all I packed was my drone, GoPro, Alltrails map, 1 gatorade, 1 Candy bar. I was wearing a pair of jeans, nike running shoes, my country shirt and a baseball cap. Thats all I had and was pretty lightweight.

I begin my climb at 6am sharp, slowly climbed the high elevation, lost my way twice and tried to figure it out without using any GPS or maps (Just to see how nomadic people did back when Jesus was alive) - Tell you what that the worst IDEA possible. Please carry your GPS or AllTrails off-line map. My offline map won't work because I couldn't afford a Pro Subscription. Regardless, getting lost is the fun part but not when you are surrounded by nature and rattlesnakes.

One thing for sure is that any time you see a human when you are lost, you have such high appreciation of mankind that you will become their best friend even they were a serial killer. Regardless, I never saw a human. But I was few clicks away from tree line when I saw knee deep snow and the moment when snow enters your shoes and makes your warm feet cold like the arctic. You just wanna yell at the top of your lungs. Nobody cared for my yelling because I was alone.

I somehow reached the tree line and there it was the summit. My left lung almost gave up but the summit was close by so I beat my chest like a caveman I am and started climbing a 75 degree incline on the OTHER SIDE OF THE MOUNTAIN. Half way through the climb I realized, "Hmmm how did people climb this mountain when they have such difficulty??" I don't even have climbing gear. But I imagined that people climbed this side of the mountain so I did too. But in reality no one did climb because there were no footsteps and the snow was mint perfect.

Moving on I reach to the top from the WRONG SIDE and started taking the drone shot. WARNING: If you are a drone user, your drone will be unstable during the flight due to cold weather and altitude. After my work, a lot of black clouds started hovering over me. This reminded me of an other thought which an old man told before I went to Mt.Yale. YOU DO NOT WANT TO BE ON THE SUMMIT WHEN THE BLACK CLOUDS HOVER OVER YOU. I don't know why but I believe the old man.

I reached the tree line after brushing my elbow because now I am defending a 70 degree inclination on just 2 legs and no support. I made it alive and it started snowing like it was hogwards and I am Harry Potter(Just Indian style)

This time I was on the right trail coming down because I know what the wrong trail looks like. I found a camper and his husky called Boomer and I left my life on that 4 legged animal, hoping that he will get me to my car. The dog did his job after making me wait for 20 mins while he searched for pooping spot.

I reached my car and thanked god for this experience, then I started planning for more epic trips of Mt. Princeton and Mt Rainer ... I love mountain climbing now!!

hiking
1 month ago

My wife and I hiked this on 6/29/18. Amazing experience!

First, the bad news: After planning this hike for 2 months, we arrived in CO to discover the road to Denny Creek trailhead was to be closed for construction. We called several state agencies, however, and were assured the road would still be open on 6/29. Great! But as we drove up the road at 5:30am, it was most definitely closed, just past the Avalanche Gulch trailhead. So we had no choice but to begin our hike from there...which turned our 10-mile hike into a 16-mile hike and added 800+ feet of elevation gain.

Now, the good news: We had the whole freakin’ mountain to ourselves! Not another human in sight the entire day. Began the ascent from Denny Creek around 6:35. Passed treeline about 9:00. Reached summit about 11:30. Breathtaking views the whole way up, especially just before treeline and on up through the tundra. Wildflowers everywhere and we saw lots of curious marmots, including one that tried to take my pack at the saddle. Last half mile is the hardest. OMG there’s no oxygen up there! Scrambling the last 100 yards to the summit is tricky but doable. Stay in the middle and go slow. Weirdly it wasn’t windy at all up there but was quite windy 100 feet lower. Began our descent at 12:00. It was harder than I expected, steep and super windy the first half. Made it back to Denny Creek trailhead about 2:45 and then began our 3-mile hike back to the car. We asked some DOT and construction workers for a lift but no luck.

So if you want your own private mountain for a day and don’t mind adding 6 miles to your hike, do Mt. Yale while the construction is going on.

I hiked this the 3rd week in June. I started up the trail late in the afternoon with my backpack and after a couple of miles, found a place to set up my tent next to the creek just below the gate. It was a nice spot but I probably would have gone farther that first day if I had known there were so many great spots to camp. The next morning, I hiked up to storm pass. Lots of elevation,but excellent views: wildlife, several waterfalls, and very few people. I sat up on Storm Pass for quite a while just taking in the views. I hiked back down and packed up my camp because I decided I wanted to camp at the lovely meadow by the creek under the huge aspens. I was visited by some free range cows that night before sundown. The next morning, I unzipped my tent to spot a big black bear down by the creek. He just lumbered up into the trees, but I was glad I hung my food the night before.
This is an enchanting strenuous hike. I cant wait to do it again.

LOST RING
Great hike, hard did it June 7th lost a gold ring right after the switch backs where it flattens out before you hike to the top. Very important.

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