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Stunning falls. beautiful clear blue water. pretty easy hike. We had a perfect winter day, not too busy, but I can see where it would be in the summer. Seriously gorgeous though

Amazing beauty with old growth and stunning waterfalls.

I’ve done it twice. Great trail.

Went today January 5th, saw 4-5 other groups the entire time. Absolutely gorgeous waterfalls. The water was very clear/blue. The forest was covered in moss and everything was very green.

The road to the trailhead is pretty bad - lots of potholes - but totally worth it. I hear this trail is very crowded in the summer. I’d highly recommend going in the winter if you want to experience it with less people around.

Went on a cold rainy December day. Thank goodness for rain gear. It was amazingly beautiful!! The waterfalls were raging

backpacking
1 month ago

Counterclockwise is definitely the way to go. I'd much rather start the trip with the burned forest section and end on a beautiful note than vice versa. If you go clockwise you also have to start with an immediate straight up hill. Gorgeous trip though either way.

Gorgeous hike with so many waterfalls! It’s busy because of the beauty and ideal for most hiking skills. Get there early and don’t complain about others wanting to enjoy this spectacular hike. Watch for slippery rocks. But enjoy God’s country!

trail running
1 month ago

Great loop trail to run. It was about 15 miles with very little elevation change. Pay attention and have your route mapped. It is easy to veer onto another trail, especially when running.

Today it was sunny, cool at 38 degrees and brisk with an East wind blowing 20+ mph. It was noticeable on the West shore, but the trees and terrain protected the rest of the trail. Mt. Hood looked fabulous with its dusting of snow. I saw 3 people on the trail getting in their last hike before the snows arrive.

super hard but one of the most amazing places i've ever been to.

A bit confusing at the beginning. If you use your phone’s GPS (and Google Maps) like I did the red trail line in the app has you starting at the shooting range. Don’t do that. Go up the road another hundred feet and that’s the proper trailhead. The split between west and east side of the loop is another 1/4 mile up after the tiny creek crossing the trail. Giving this 5 stars because I hiked 5 miles in on both a Sat and Sunday and never saw another human. So if solitude is your thing this is perfect. Several nice areas to camp out along the the river every half mile or so. The cement bridge over Fish Creek about 3 miles up is another great spot to camp. Previous post is correct in that the lack of other hikers allows larger game animals to feel more at home. These hills have eyes!

backpacking
2 months ago

My girlfriend and I hiked up from the north side down to the second concrete bridge. Roughly 5 miles. We spent 2 nights camped near the first bridge. We only saw one other human for 3 days. The trail is better kept (at least that far) than I expected it to be. however it is thick brush with poor visibility. Large game is definitely populous there. there are definitely coyote, mt lion, bears and large deer. i dont recomend going out there without a gun. especially if you plan to spend the night.

backpacking
2 months ago

I've hiked this trail twice so far. Both times I went clockwise and not the ccw most recommend. I prefer getting the elevation done the first day, camp around green lakes then hike the rest in the morning.

hiking
2 months ago

The trail is open but there are warning signs to be extra cautious due to the Sept fatal cougar attack. Mules carrying the search party made a mess of the once smooth trail with hoof sized holes.

one week ago, we went clockwise. Did hiker summit, camped a couple miles before wasco. 11 miles day 1. second day we added canyon meadow trail, and then continued back to loop and back to car at PCT lot. 17 miles day 2 for a total of around 28 miles in two days. Amazing and beautiful trip, highly suggest. Saw one mountain goat. Clear blue skies, just some cold cold wind.

Just completed yesterday. Started Monday from TL Lodge and went clockwise, as suggested. If I had do overs I would do CCW and end on easy, cruising trail rather than the sandpit climb back up to the lodge.
Water crossing were all easily done with dry feet except for the last one, White River, when done CW. I easily forded that one. Rock hopping possible, I'm sure, if you are willing to scout up and down the river a ways. I determined the ford the safest and fastest way and it felt refreshing on my worn feet.
Trail conditions are great. Water sources plentiful even with many dried out for the season. Completed in 2.5 days. 40's at night. Cool in the mornings but hot in the afternoons. Pack appropriately for 3 seasons and get out there and do it while the window is still open. From what I hear, this is atypical for this time of year. Glad I was able to sneak it in!

AMAZING! Pack warm though. We actually got snowed on. By far one of the best backpacking trips I've ever done.

This trail is beautiful especially in the fall. I did the hike alone but i don’t recommend that. A few dangers to keep in mind: the fog can roll in quickly and you can lose visibility. I hiked it September 28- October 2 2018. I was 1 mile from the lodge and the fog rolled in and i lost the trail. Pretty much where the hiker that just died was found a week later. It was scary but i had a beacon in case of emergency. I ended up by palmer lift up on the glacier. It was very scary. I got lucky and the fog cleared for a second and i saw the palmer lift and then it disappeared again. I started to head that direction and back down hill when i got a brief glimpse of the lodge and then it also disappeared again. I was lucky i was in a ravine that went straight to the lodge. I was stuck up there for 6 hrs before i found my way back. I almost used my beacon but grateful i didn’t have to. I totally recommend the hike you just need to be prepared for anything. I plan to go back and see where i went wrong. I also am advocating for a sign to be added where that turn off is. Multiple hikers have gotten lost there. Good luck it was absolutely breathtaking and i feel like a badass fir completing the hike solo. Yeah me!!

hiking
3 months ago

Went solo on this trip the last week in September in 9 days/8 nights. One needs a permit and there is an easy system to sign up on-line either through a lottery system in March or there are walk-up intermarry possibilities if one has a flexible schedule. Also, routes can either be clock-wise or counter clock-wise in layout. The hike could be comfortably be done in 7 days/6 nights from a mileage perspective. I would rate this as 'hard' but not that 'difficult' in that there is +/- 25,000 ft. of elevation gain and loss for the whole hike, 2k-3K per day on average. It is hard as there is so much up and down. Hiking poles for me were a must. It is not difficult in that it is, during the summer months, a heavily traveled trek and the trails are generally well maintained and easy to follow forest paths. Each day you at going up and down at least one major 2K+ foot section between camps. With side-trips, the 93- 96 mile trek easily ends up over 100+ miles. I took the alternative 'Spray' trail in the northwest as this route is higher up, with closer views of the mountain. There are mountain goats, elk, dear and bear and, the ever present marmots. The weather cooperated, for the most part - 4 days of sunshine, 3 days of overcast, 1 day of rain and 1 day of snow (at 6,000 ft.). The temperature was in the 50s during the day which made for excellent hiking conditions, without overheating. There were no bugs and few people in the camp sites in late September. One is rewarded throughout with spectacular views of the mountain, hills, valleys and rivers as well as different scenery on each day as one heads through different sections and climate zones. In late September, the colors of the bushes change to fiery reds, oranges, yellows and purples - all providing a stark contrast to the bare mountain terrain they grow on. The Wonderland Trail takes one through barren outcrops, subalpine meadows, old growth forests, 'burned' out sections that are regenerating, talus fields and, of course, raging glacial river valleys which leave their silty/rocky deposits below. It is 'hard' because of the elevation gains and losses. All bridges were in place and markers in riverbeds were easy to spot as one navigated low lying sections. I enjoyed the campsites as they all have backcountry privies that are convenient and bear poles for your food/trash at night. In late September, there are few that you are sharing with. One of the pluses for this type of hike is that in each corner of the park, there are cache points to pre-stage food if you choose not to carry it all with you. Further, all campsites, save one, had stream, lake or other water sources near by so water for cooking and drinking was not a problem. Few trails of this length are as well laid out and maintained, with spectacular scenery, and this is the grand daddy of them all. Take the time - it is worth it.

Began at 7am and completed clockwise loop in 1 day. Precipitation most of the day and clouds finally cleared around mile 30 for some great views. Not much runoff so river crossing were relatively dry. No GPS signal for offline map, garmin watch or inreach tracker that day around Heather and Clark creek so study that area well to avoid losing the trail.

Well graded for the most part and very well maintained. Many miles above the treeline, offering amazing views on the top part of the mountain and its many glaciers. River fording can be tricky, but is a major highlight of the Trail.
Found much secludedness when we tackled the whole trail in early october. Got snowed on! Great experience.

Dropped by later in the season (late October) last year and was blocked by snow after 5 miles or so ... so I made a point to come back a bit earlier this year and I'm so glad I did as the fall colors and the tail end of the summer bloom was in full effect. I went counter Clockwise and the timing worked out nicely with the sunset and sunrise. However if you are headed south on the PCT first thing in the morning you will likely meet more people - In my case at least 5 groups of hunters and 4 groups of hikers. (I would go clockwise if I wanted to avoid people on the full loop. ) I ended up camping on the downslope somewhere around where the trail branches off for summit lake. This spot was amazing for a 360 degree view of sunset, moonrise, and then sunrise.

Hiked on Sept 28. Need a NW Forest Pass. Water available (bring treatment) all along Trail to Ice Lake. Nice gradual incline and trail is well-marked. Took me 3 hours, 72 degrees and sunny. Beautiful yellow Fall foliage all along route. It is hunting season now so be aware of that and wear neon orange. Trail to Matterhorn was well-marked for first 3/4 mile, after that I was just looking for the least slippery slope. Had to stop twice to rest. Thin air and quite steep. Took me 1 1/2 hours to reach summit. Worth every step to get a 360 view of the stunning Eagle Caps! I was actually higher than some birds! This trail is not for anyone who is afraid of heights or is not in good shape. Back at car at 6:10 pm so it took me almost 10 hours with stops for photos and snacks. One of the most beautiful hikes I have ever done!

hiking
3 months ago

Hiked the loop on 9/27 - 9/28 of 2018 CCW. The first few miles in this direction is through an area that has completely burned out and the dead trees look very eerie. Glad I went CCW so as to get this section over in the beginning of the trek and leave the great views for the end.

Lots of water sources in all areas EXCEPT NONE between the southern part where the trail turns sharply north. Before you start the northerly trek up to No Name Lake (CCW direction), be sure you have plenty of water. Lake and creek are not safe to drink. Lot's of sweat and the need to stay hydrated is very important. Three liters was barely enough for myself and dog. Were thirsty when arriving back to the lake and TH.

Worst part of the trip was being worried about following the correct trail. The entire Rim trail is horribly marked and there's several intersections with trails that have NO signs and are not on any map or Garmin. It was kind of crazy this way! Example, you're walking the RIM trail and you come across a sign that simply says "TRAIL" with an arrow heading off to the cliff. Then there's fork where it says horses one direction and hikers in the other, so you think you're at the section where the livestock trail begins and you only have 1.5 miles to the lake. But then a couple more miles later you actually come to that junction and wonder what the heck just happened.

Overall great hike but plan accordingly with water and be sure to navigate well. If you take the wrong path then you'll add extra miles on to your trip.

Beautiful trail to backpack in the fall. The leaves are vibrant and less people on the trail!

Great Trail..

We were amazed by the clear blue waters of the river not to mention the beauty of Sahalie Falls. We absolutely loved it!! We definitely would hike it again next time we are in the area. :)

backpacking
3 months ago

Did this as a 9-day through hike with my wife last month. Absolutely amazing! We liked it better than the Timberline Trail around Mt. Hood. So many amazing viewpoints of the mountain and the flowers were plentiful. Beautiful lakes and subalpine meadows. Our favorite area was the Ohanapecosh valley and Indian Bar. Klapatche, St. Andrew’s Lake, and Summerland were amazing too. Pack light and use the food cache areas to make this challenging hike more enjoyable.

Wonderful trip! Did this as a 4-day backpacking trip with my wife in August of 2017. Breathtaking views, wildflowers, historic shelters, and snow fields. This hike has a little bit of everything. If your itinerary allows, camp at Dollar Lake on the north side of the mountain. It’s a short climb from the main trail, but has excellent campsites, a beautiful view of the mountain, and a nice place for a swim or washing clothes. Water crossings vary significantly with temperature and rainfall. Sandy, Coe, and Elliott were the most challenging for us. It’s a fantastic and challenging hike.

just finished a 4 day run with my cousin. Awesome views, some nasty weather at times, but a really incredible experience

lots of people but great entry level backpacking

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