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great hike, but be prepared. it is not an easy trail. this loop transitions from a well maintained trail to steep stone steps, to rock hopping across areas where no trail is defined. the stagecoach rd is amazing, when you think of how it was built, hiking up it, know it is a long steep grade on a rock road. the rim trail leaving the stagecoach rd is your typical trail, and easy hiking untill it gets back around to the point it has to cross Collins river. it becomes more difficult there with some rock hopping.

overall I liked it, the camp sites are nice, water is plentiful, while it is not an easy loop, it is not overly difficult. it is well marked.

Brutal but well worth the pain. It was awesome.

Definitely difficult terrain, especially the last portion near the river. Fallen leaves cover slippery mud, tree roots and rocks. I wish I had a walking stick! Trail isn’t marked well in some areas. However, it might be our age? We were passed a few times by younger hikers that were almost skipping down the trail!

Great hike if you want to wonder why the hell you aren’t back to your car yet for a couple miles. Rocks near the bottom are super slick and could make for a sore buttocks so be careful. Decent views. Easy in, hard out.

Hiked the trail past few days...any Lost And Found?

very cool,can't wait to make it up pikes peak

I've done the Fiery Gizzard to Raven's Point twice. It does not disappoint. I suggest you take the Fiery Gizzard trail out and return on the Dog Hole Trail. Your quads and knees will appreciate it.

I've also done the Savage Gulf trail referenced in the review below. I will agree that the climb out of the Savage Gulf is harder.

My last trip to the Fiery Gizzard was November 3, 2018. On my first trip, which was in early May, 2018, I only recall missing one turn and I quickly realized I was off trail, back tracked to last marker and picked up the trail again pretty easily. On this last trip the there were several large trees down on the trail and I missed several turns, At least twice I caught up with other people who had stopped to look around for trail markers. Maybe it was the downed trees, maybe it was because of all the leaves on the ground, I don't know. But something was making the trail disappear at times. This is not to say the trail isn't well marked - it is. You have to look for white tree markers. A lot of the trail is rocky. Full of rocks. boulder size rocks. If you don't feel like you are on the trail, go back to the last white tree marker and look again. It would be hard to get completely turned around on this trail. But the trail does seem to disappear at times.

This one's definitely worth the effort. The scenery is beautiful, but rugged. The terrain is very rocky through the gulf. I hiked down through the gulf and returned along the rim via the Dog Hole Trail after Raven's point, as the map here suggests. After climbing out of the gulf (this is the hardest part - pretty much straight uphill), the return trip is pretty easy. Be careful of loose rocks in the gulf, and pay attention to the trail markers. I hiked this trail alone and got turned around a few times. The trail markers are hard to spot in some places. The view from Raven's Point is magnificent. The point sticks out into the gulf, so you're surrounded by expansive views on 3 sides, and there's plenty of space, so it doesn't feel crowded even when other people are there.

If you've hiked through the Big Creek loop at Savage Gulf, this route is very similar. I think Savage Gulf is harder than Fiery Gizzard, but based on the reviews for both, it seems like there are mixed opinions on that.

Started at the Jim Adams Wilderness spur leading to Cumberland Trail. Plenty of parking. Gravel, wide path for biking and hiking. Runs along Gulf and intersects with Bear Creek. Beautiful scenery from rock faces to autumnal colored leaves, waterfalls and swimming holes. Clear, blue to green water. Easy terrain first 2.5 miles, then starts uphill and grassy. Beware of frequent slippery tree roots. Some fallen trees to maneuver around, over, under. Great hike, so picturesque and uncrowded in Fall (sure it is a different story when hot!)

[TL;DR: Solid trail, good workout. Varied terrain so you won't get bored. Watch out for false trails.]

First, if you're reading this close to the date of this post, go now. The leaves just started really changing color about a week ago, and now it is in full swing. Lots of pines, but in the deciduous areas it is all red and gold. The trail is casually beautiful, with the occasional stunner just laying nonchalantly in full view of the trail. Waterfalls, cliffs, boulder fields, etc.

Second, someone below said this is harder that Fiery Gizzard; I would disagree. I would say it is equal to Fiery Gizzard to Raven's Point Loop, but with a different kind of difficulty. I would compare it more closely to Lower Loop at Fall Creek Falls, but with rougher paths and more and longer scrambles.

You will have a scramble on either side of the trail head. The one to the right (counterclockwise) is more continuous, with no real flat spots until you're out of the scramble. The one to the left (clockwise) is not a continuous scramble, but seemed more difficult due to a number of odd angles and weird transitions. I would call them equally difficult, but in different ways. I would recommend going to the right from trailhead, though, if only because the left-hand side gives you a beautiful spot to appreciate once you get close to trailhead on the way back.

Outside of the scrambles the path tends to be very broken and rough, but nothing worrisome. You will need to cross 4-5 streams, so keep an eye on the rain and prepare accordingly.

The ascent on the way back is fairly rapid, but not too much so.

I will note that I cut the loop close to the end: I cut across the connector trail by the sawmill campsite instead of completing the last nub of the loop, trying to save 30 minutes to an hour as I was racing sunset (late start, thanks Google Maps). It was a good choice, as I made it back to the parking lot just in time for a golden sunset. I carry night gear, but doing a scramble in the dark on a new trail did not seem like a good idea.

One important warning I haven't seen anyone else mention: there are false trails everywhere. Some seen ike abandoned paths, some for locals, some seem natural, but it is very easy to go off trail here. I went down two false trails (one even had a wooden ramp along a cliff edge), and I ran into two groups that had lost members further back on the trail, which I hadn't seen. One very tricky spot is when you cross the suspension bridge when heading couter-clockwise. Once over that there'll be a small footbridge. At that point the trail will be slightly behind your right shoulder; take an immediate right. Someone has tried to block the false trail (immediately in front if the footbridge) with a wall of branches, but it just looks like trail debris. Lots of blazes down, so when in doubt, just stop and break out the app, otherwise you'll be off trail and have no idea.

All in all, a good day trail. I completed 13 miles in about 8 hours, counting breaks, without being in any great rush (cutting to the connector did help). Bear in mind with the varied terrain and scrambles your speed is not going to remain steady. Also remember that you've have a moderately long scramble wanting for you at the end of the trail no matter which way you go, so don't exhaust yourself. Everyone I met on trail was overnighting, but you shouldn't have a problem doing a day hike.

Not for the faint of heart, but oh-so rewarding!!!

Fantastic trail. Thank you CT for all the trail work and your vision. Fall/winter late coming in 2018 and undergrowth just now fully clearing. Colors peaking in next 10 days or so.

As fine a trail as we’ve hiked this year. And we’ve done many moderate trails in SW Utah, North Rim, part of PCT, and several in Joyce-Kilmer during 2018. The trail is challenging but not overly so. The gorge is fantastic.

A treasure in our own backyard.

did this trail Oct 13. nice trail. not the best rim trail. there is a huge mistake on this trail map. I took the trail to the gulf first on advice from a hiking pro. saving the bolder field for last. better than a 3 mile up hill out of the gulf. If you do this route please note that when you get to Sawmill Camp take the connector trail to the right just past the foot bridge. The map on here shows you going on the river bed and making a large loop to the stagecoach trail. I tried to blaze this trail but lost track of the trail. Had to backtrack to the bridge. If there was a trail there it would add around a mile and a half. Which it did add 1 mile on my hike going in and back out. Just watch for the connector trail on the right past the bridge. It takes you to the Stagecoach.

Wanted a good workout and I got one. The trail is lovely and the blazes are solid (only had to check the map twice.)

Fiery Gizzard is smooth and easy til about a mile or so past the first bridge. After that you'll be doing a rock scramble until you get to the turn off for Raven's Point. One word: if you're out there in the cold and rain, take your break further back from the overlook, as the wind will break your heat bubble and hit you hard after being in the cleft.

Heading back on Dog Hole is easy, and a welcome cool down after ~3 mi. of scramble.

Only one bad spot right now: had no choice but to go into ankle deep mud due to what looks to be a mudslide and a fallen tree that took out a chunk of path as it slid into the water. Also had to cross several streams, but that was probably just the rain.

Such a beautiful trail. The waterfall was dry but the view was still very worth it. Pictures just don't do it justice. Make sure if you plan it as a day hike to get there with 6 hours of daylight at least. Definitely planning on coming back in the summer for a few days camping.

I day-hiked this trail today (10/25/18) and really enjoyed it. It has some great scenery and the water supply is abundant. It’s a shame that some folks litter and don’t exercise any respect for the outdoors & nature. I will say that the majority of the litter was around “the swimming hole”. I do plan to return and hike this trail again and also do some camping.

Hiked up and down on Monday 10/22 on a spectacular, clear day. Navigation was mostly self-explanatory, Barr trail camp was a wonderful gem of a stopover, and the range of terrain was spectacular. Upper three were occasionally snow covered, better part of last 2 miles were often icy and left me looking for rocks. If doing again, I’d take micro spikes with me in addition to poles. It’s a really strong, intense our and back is you are up for it. Took me 6:30 on way up, and 4:30 on way down. Hard and glorious day.
I had 3-20oz bottles with me which was plenty of capacity - refueled at Barr camp (2x - you need a filtration system) and summit once. Your last water source before the summit is the creek. H the A-Frame (around 11,800 ft and 2 miles beyond Barr camp, i think). And make sure you age. Every basic essential - this is a high, exposed trail with little support.

trail to Jack's River falls. multiple creek fords. don't lose the trail! camping is allowed about a mile past the falls you have to Ford the river. great trail. will come back in summer

A tough one in full packs. We were preparing for a long trek later in the fall. Rock fields are persistent. Wear solid boots and pack light.

However, worth the effort to see the river in those settings. At one point water disappeared into a karat feature only to return further downstream.

On balance - a challenging trail through beautiful place.

Nice well marked trail with good scenery. The return hike is just about all uphill. It was pretty hard, but well worth the trip.

backpacking
25 days ago

Would definitely do this trail again.

beautiful place! loved it and my hiking team loved the challenge.

Third time hiking this trail (first during winter and the second during summer). Despite it being mid-October, there was still a lot of snow on the upper two-thirds of the trail, so definitely bring appropriate gear and be prepared to stay out all day; it's a very long trek. Mirror Lake was frozen over but there are some nearby streams to get fresh water, if needed. Also, the gate to access Monarch Lake trailhead was open, but I know they close it as it gets closer to winter so double-check this before heading out, as it can add an extra 2 miles (round trip) to the hike. Otherwise, beautiful hike - one of my favorites in Colorado.

It was a great trip!
we went South to start, did river crossing 1st and 2nd day, hiked falls spur 2nd day without packs, climbed 1400 ft 3rd day. North end from spur to parking lot going east, I didn't like that part. But I'm not in the best of shape, that s*** straight up folks! Trails were mostly easy to see at river crossing, just gotta look for blue (mostly-some white) blazes across the river.

Somewhat mixed feelings about this trail, but overall it’s definitely worth trip. You start up near the interpretive center. I went on a weekend with the dog and the start was a bit of a circus because the two main park trails are slotted onto the same lane. Once you get to the canyon floor the red trail splits off, which is what you take. They seem to do a good job maintaining the trails. Clearly marked and not a ton of debris. I went after a hurricane and the crew was out there setting things right and even once I got ahead of them things still went pretty smoothly. The first part doesn’t have a ton of excitement. It’s a quiet forest stroll which isn’t bad. Just don’t expect towering canyons right off. Eventually you turn onto a ridge and pass some campsites. Once you get to campsite 2, there’s and option to keep going straight and cu about a mile off. We did that because things had been getting somewhat monotonous. Up until that point I was a bit disappointed. Then we turned up the canyon. The fences are a bit nanny-state like, but you get still get some pretty rad views. Shortly after the trail reconnects along the main drag and you can take in the rest of the canyon.

backpacking
1 month ago

We just hiked this on 10/10/18 . I can tell you that the trails are not clearly marked. the trail head does t even tell you your at conasauga river trail. it's just a big sign with a blurry map and you walk dow a road a little with a little wooden sign that just says trail. almost missed it. once you get to the river it is beautiful down there. but it's very hard to tell which way to go. we went left oops. haha wrong way came back after a pretty good distant walk. went right this time. found the trail most of the way think we crossed the river 5 times. before we couldn't see a trail anymore so we gave up found a camping spot and camped for the night. that was the night of hurricane Michael. well we woke up and the rover did rise quite a bit and was flowing fast so we decided to pack up and head back. Just wish the trails where clearly marked in some way. even with just marking tape . other then that we will be back to do it again!!!

Didn’t make it all the way to Barr camp but still great hike and beautiful views all the way up!

backpacking
1 month ago

I did this loop as a 1-night overnight. Actually, it was my first backpacking trip though I have day-hiked many, many miles. We dropped in at crack-in-the-wall and exited at the Sneaker Route.

Be mindful of storms in the area, for the few days prior to your hike. I find these warnings fatiguing when I read about canyon hikes, but when you are *in* the canyon and you see how prone you are to water you realize you can’t be too careful with this risk.

As a hike, this is tremendous. It is magnificent and worth all the effort. Take this hike. I would advise this as a day-hike, though. At 11 miles it’s a reasonable day-hike length and the effect of a large pack on your center of gravity at egress is unwelcome.

[1] The drive down Hole in the Rock road takes longer than you think. It’s rough, slow driving.
[2] There are 2 trail heads - the first is called Water Tank and is close to Hamblin Arch, the second is called 40 Mile and is more east. The path from 40 Mile trail head, east to Crack in the Wall, is easy to follow and turns from sandy to bare rock about halfway. Cairns are easy to follow.
[3] In the gulch, the trail miles just zoom past. There is so much to see and the trail is constantly changing. That said, it’s not particularly fast, and it’s not particularly taxing (even with backpacking weight). We did about 25 minutes per mile in the gulch without really trying, and without dawdling.
[4] I found Hamblin Arch, itself, a bit underwhelming, but the rest of the canyon was far better than expected.
[5] The Sneaker Route (called Moki Stairs on Google Maps?) is wildly fun. I ascended it without rope and with 30 pounds on my back - slowly. Prior to my trip I had read countless reviews of this feature and I saw a wide variety of comments representing all skill levels and risk appetites. I found it to be less physically taxing than expected, but simultaneously a bit more unnerving. Know yourself before doing this.
[6] The Sneaker Route is right on the trail and easy to find if you know what you’re looking for. But...if you don’t you might walk right past like I did. I found this AT app to be valuable in this regard.
[7] It is difficult to determine the “top” of the Sneaker Route as the rock simply becomes less steep. The cairns point to Water Tank trail head, so if you parked at 40 Mile TH be prepared to get east before you might think you need to. After the egress, the hike to the TH is anticlimactic.

hiking
1 month ago

As others have said this is a 16 mile hike. We went down the Crack in the wall. Fantastic views and the gulch itself has new vistas around every corner. Slow going for the first 3 miles in the gulch. The rock scramble up from the Jacob Hamelin arch is totally underestimated in all descriptions. It is hard and the ropes left by others cannot be relied on. Two in our party could not do this and walked out the Hurricane Wash for an extra 5 miles

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