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Best trails in Isle of Man

27 Reviews
Ready to check out the best trails in Isle of Man? AllTrails has 15 great hiking trails, trail running trails, walking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 8 moderate trails in Isle of Man ranging from 3.1 to 13.4 miles and from 29 to 872 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Isle of Man
Top trails (15)
#1 - Tholt y Will
Lezayre, Ayre, Isle of Man
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Length: 3.1 mi • Est. 1 h 44 m
This walk is through probably the prettiest glen on the Isle of Man, and goes along the wild and beautiful Sulby River and Sulby Reservoir, with views of Snaefell adjacent to the glen. It is in a beautiful inland area where hills, glen, pine forest, lake and tumbling river all feature. Starting from the car park by the side of the Sulby Reservoir, the route begins over the dam and into a wooded area. The path descends running close to the Sulby River which, at this stage, is a crystal clear bubbling stream, before steadily rising up the glen. On the way the stream cascades through the glen, with several sharp falls clearly in view. Near the top an intricate path on a boardwalk threads its way over the stream and rocky outcrop. The main route takes you through a farm and then down to Sulby Reservoir. Alternatively you can return directly to the car park down the road, and miss out the route around the reservoir. You will need to negotiate several bridges, gates, steps and a few stiles on the route. The total height climbed over the course of the walk is 590 ft. Sheep run free on the hills, so dog owners are advised to keep their pets on a lead in open ground. Allow 1.5-2 hours for the walk.Show more
#2 - Raad Ny Foillan: Douglas to Derbyhaven
Douglas, Middle, Isle of Man
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Length: 13.4 mi • Est. 6 h 47 m
#3 - Raad Ny Foillan: Port St. Mary to Port Erin
Port St Mary, Rushen, Isle of Man
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Length: 6.6 mi • Est. 3 h 33 m
#4 - Bradda Glen and Fleshwick Bay
Port Erin, Rushen, Isle of Man
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Length: 4.4 mi • Est. 2 h 30 m
This Isle of Man walk with steep climbs, takes you along the outer reach of Port Erin harbour, high above it where you will see magnificent views across the bay, to the southerly part of the Island and to Ireland. The first section of the walk passes to the prominent landmark of Milner's Tower, and on along sheer cliffs with steep climbs and then towards the descent to picturesque Fleshwick Bay, and back to Bradda Glen. The walk begins with a climb along the headland and up to Milners Tower at the top of Bradda Head, with commanding views over the south of the island and views of Northern Ireland. There are several paths along the headland and the walk takes in the lower one, which gives a better view of the sea where views of many seabirds and seals are possible. You will come to Milner's Tower, a feature visible from all of Port Erin. Following a clear, meandering path along the steep sea cliffs, the route reaches the highest point of the walk and then takes a steep descent plus a short walk along a descending road to the pretty Fleshwick Bay. The final stretch follows the minor road back towards the doors of Bradda Glen. There are several steep climbs. A few of the paths run along exposed cliffs which need care, particularly with children and dogs. You will need to negotiate a few stiles on the route. Sheep run free on the hills, so dog owners are advised to keep their pets on a lead. Allow 2.5 hours for the walk.Show more
#5 - Douglas to Port Soderick
Douglas, Middle, Isle of Man
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Length: 5 mi • Est. 2 h 47 m
A mile linear walk from Douglas to Port Soderick on the Isle of Man, making use of a steam train for the return leg. This walk is one of a series of walks which encompasses the unique forms of transport on the Isle of Man as an integral part of the walk. These are: (1) The Manx Electric Railway (sometimes called Tramway), (2) The Snaefell Mountain Railway (sometimes called Tramway), (3) The Manx Steam Railway and (4) The Groudle Glen Railway. This walk focuses on Number (3), The Manx Steam Railway. This walk goes along the coast from the railway station in Douglas to the railway station in Port Soderick. On the way you will pass the cliff-side lighthouse at the south of the bay, the Camera Obscura, the Gentleman's Bathing Beach, head along the Marine Drive that takes you along some sheer cliffs (on a road that barely holds on to the side of the cliff!), then down to a bay and a gurgling stream in a glen. As most of the walking surface is hard, it is a good walk to take if there has been some rain, when other local walks are too wet. The Manx Steam Railway is used for the return leg, along the coast and inland back to Douglas. The train you will take back is most likely of the original rolling stock, with original interiors and even a Pullman class which serves lunches on particular journeys (booking required). It is the longest narrow gauge steam line in Britain that still uses its original locomotives and carriages. The three foot narrow gauge railway was opened in 1874 and is now 15.5 miles long. This train is in use in the summer season and travels a picturesque route across the south of the Island from Douglas to Castletown and Port Erin. This walk utilises the last stretch of the railway. The paths are generally surfaced and there are a few moderate gradients and steps, but no stiles on route. Sheep are spread widely in the Island so it would be wise to ensure that if you bring your dog it is steady towards sheep, and is happy on the train ride. Allow 2.5 hours for the walk plus extra time for the train. Show more
#6 - Port Erin and Cregneash
Port Erin, Rushen, Isle of Man
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Length: 6.9 mi • Est. 3 h 47 m
IMPORTANT NOTE: Dogs are NOT allowed on this walk due to Manx Authority regulation. This is a circular walk from Port Erin on the Isle of Man passing close to steep coastal cliffs, and follows up with an inland route through the historic village of Cregneash. This walk is one of the most pleasant on the island. It is a fairly challenging coastal walk with several steep climbs and descents. There are amazing views toward the beginning of the route, illuminating how the walk passes over several hills, from a sea level start and back to sea level part way through. The views throughout are spectacular. The initial direction is towards the Calf of Man, a separate small island. The footpath stays close to the coast where the views down the cliffs and out to sea are beautiful. Look out for the many seals which live in the area and spend resting time on the rocky island shore. The route continues out along the Spanish Head to the most southerly tip of the main island, again with excellent views, where Castletown, Port St Mary and the island of Langness come into view. The walk then passes The Chasms, steep fissures in rocks that go down some distance (definitely not an area to take pets or young children). After the Chasms the route turns inland to the heritage village of Cregneash, where some of the buildings and past ways of life are preserved. There are several village houses on display and look out for the unusual Lochlan sheep in the area. In spring you may catch a glimpse of the fields being ploughed by powerful workhorses. Finally, the route descends back to the quay at Port Erin. There are several steep climbs and descents and the total height climbed over the course of the walk is 1530ft. There are a few stiles on the way, but all are easily crossed. As noted above, there is a Manx Authority regulation that dogs are NOT allowed on this walk. Allow 3 hours for the walk. Show more
#7 - Baldrine and Groudle
Onchan, Middle, Isle of Man
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Length: 10.3 mi • Est. 5 h 11 m
This walk is one of a series of walks which encompasses the unique forms of transport in the Isle of Man as an integral part of the walk. These are: (1) The Manx Electric Railway (sometimes called Tramway), (2) The Snaefell Mountain Railway (sometimes called Tramway), (3) The Manx Steam Railway and (4) The Groudle Glen Railway. This circular walk focuses on Number (4), The Groudle Glen Railway. This is a very varied walk, taking in pasture land, tracks, minor roads, a picturesque bay, a nature reserve, ancient church, and a glen with tumbling stream, and an (optional) ride on the railway. The unique transport part of the journey is in taking an (optional) ride part way through the walk on the meticulously restored Groudle Glen Railway, a fairly short trip from the station in a glen to a cafe and a previous sea lion pen at the coast, set in the stunning cliffs at the coast. Sheep are spread widely in the Island so it would be wise to ensure that if you bring your dog it is steady towards sheep, and is happy to travel in a Groudle railway carriage. You will need to negotiate several gradients, road stretches and steps, but there are no stiles on route. Allow 5.5 hours.Show more
#8 - Raad Ny Foillan: Port Erin to Niarbyl
Port Erin, Rushen, Isle of Man
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Length: 10.3 mi • Est. 6 h 16 m
#9 - Snaefell and Mines
Lezayre, Ayre, Isle of Man
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Length: 4 mi • Est. 2 h 38 m
This is a comparatively short walk, but it covers a steep climb to the highest point on the Isle of Man, gives a view of the mountain railway at its peak and a chance to examine the site of what was a thriving mine some 100+ years ago. SPECIAL NOTICE: On motorcycle race days in June and in August please ensure you know the times of the races in the area (widely advertised on the Manx Radio, local press, and tourist offices), because you will not be able to park at the start or cross over the mountain road when the races are in progress, as it is a part of the race route. The walk route takes you for a climb at the start to the peak of Snaefell, the Isle of Man’s highest mountain. At the top of Snaefell, on a clear day there is a 360 degree view of the whole of the Island, as well as views of Cumbria, Scotland, Northern Ireland and parts of Wales on an exceptionally clear day. Food, drinks and toilets are also available at the summit. After your descent and a further short climb, you will descend to the disused zinc and lead mines that were thriving more than 100 years ago. The route back is steep, across moorland to the start, where you will also be able to see some of the Manx Railway trains which go from Snaefell to Laxey at the end of the valley. The total height climbed over the course of the walk is 1780 ft and there are several steep sections. The paths are remote and indistinct on the moorlands so you will need a map and the live GPS map on the App will be particularly helpful. You will need to negotiate a few gates and stiles (some of which have wire fenced surrounds so dogs will need a lift over) on the route. Sheep run free on the hills, so dog owners are advised to keep their pets on a lead. Allow 2-2.5 hours for the walk.Show more
#10 - Douglas Bay and Groudle Glen
Douglas, Middle, Isle of Man
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Length: 7.8 mi • Est. 3 h 50 m
A walk on the Isle of Man that packs in a wide variety of terrain and features, where you will experience bracing fresh air along the promenade, a steep climb around the bay, rocky cliffs with a working vintage railway and two very pretty glens with tumbling streams. This walk packs a great amount into a comparatively short distance with coastal, cliff and glen walks. The walk starts gently along by Douglas Bay, to the Manx electric tram terminal at the end of the Bay. From here the path rises to the steep cliffs with panoramic views over Douglas Bay. A short steep climb is followed by a descent to the pretty cove at Groudle. There is lots to explore here including a small narrow gauge railway lovingly restored by enthusiasts and a former sea lion pen, which was a local attraction many years ago. The route heads on to Groudle Glen, a very picturesque glen with an old water mill, and stream flowing through it all the way. After a short road walk to the village is the delightful Port Jack Glen which leads back onto the promenade. There are several climbs and descents throughout. There are a few stiles on the way, but all are easily crossed. There are no sheep on this route, but part of the route goes along the bottom of gardens, where the steep cliff path is unfenced, so dog walkers would need to be vigilant for the safety of their pets. Allow 3.5 hours for the walk.Show more
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