Best trails in Ireland

14,001 Reviews
Ready to check out the best trails in Ireland? AllTrails has 756 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Just looking to take a quick stroll? We've got 352 easy trails in Ireland ranging from 0.6 to 106 miles and from 0 to 3,038 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
Show more
Map of trails in Ireland
Top trails (756)
#1 - Carrauntoohil Mountain Via Devil's Ladder Trail
Killarney National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(209)
Length: 7.9 mi • Est. 5 h 11 m
A gorgeous hike to the top of the tallest mountain in Ireland. Though there are several different routes up Carrauntoohil, the Devil's Ladder is the most common route. Most of the "ladder" itself has become eroded and loose rock makes the scramble up and down exciting, but very rewarding.Show more
#2 - Glendalough 'White' Route
Wicklow Mountains National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(240)
Length: 5.4 mi • Est. 3 h 10 m
Really beautiful hike. Solid ground and boardwalks. Wear rain gear. Clouds come in fast with high wind action. Show more
#3 - Howth Loop Trail
Howth, County Dublin, Ireland
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(191)
Length: 10.0 mi • Est. 5 h 7 m
Enjoy stunning scenery as you follow the clifftop paths around the Howth peninsula. The Howth peninsula forms the northern tip of Dublin Bay and has long been a popular destination for daytrippers keen to explore its fishing village, its hills and sea cliffs. Despite its proximity to Dublin city, it largely retains a wild, remote feel on account of its relative isolation from the rest of the mainland. This guide explores the harbour area around Howth Village before rambling along the clifftop path around the peninsula, returning over the central hills and via the grounds of Howth Castle. The geology of the peninsula is predominantly quartzite and with rocks dating from the Cambrian period, approximately 550 million years ago, making them among the oldest rocks in Ireland. Evidence of human habitation on the peninsula dates back to at least 3,500 BC. Howth is depicted in a 2nd century map of Ireland by the Alexandrian scholar, Ptolemy, as a small island named Edri Deserta, or Edar's Desert. This suggests that the Sutton Isthmus, which connects Howth to the mainland, only formed in the last 1,900 years. The name Howth originates in the Norse word, Hofuth, meaning headland, and dates from the time of the Viking settlement of the Dublin area. The Irish name for Howth, Binn Éadair, may mean Hill of Edar, referring to one of the Tuatha De Dannan tribe, believed to be buried on the Ben of Howth, or it may be a corruption of Ben na Dair, meaning Hill of the Oaks. The Vikings arrived in 819 AD and established Howth as an important seaport. Following their defeat at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014, many of the survivors fled to Howth, where they were left to settle in peace. A number of surnames common to the Howth area, such as Harford, Thunder, Rickard and Waldron, are of Norse origin. The Norsemen remained at Howth until the Norman invasion of Ireland when they were defeated by the Norman knight Almeric Tristram on St Laurence's Day, 10 August 1177. Tristram took the surname St Laurence in honour of his victory and established his estate at Howth Castle. The castle has remained in the ownership of the St Laurence family ever since, although the unbroken line of male succession came to an end in 1909. Isolated from the rest of Dublin, Howth existed as a sleepy fishing village for most of its history until the early 19th century when it was selected to serve as the port for the mail packet ship service to Britain. The harbour at Howth was opened in 1818 but suffered from problems with silting and the packet ship relocated to Dun Laoghaire in 1834. The harbour remains home to a substantial fishing fleet and the village is now a smart suburb of Dublin thanks to the DART railway service. The village and the cliff path draws many tourists throughout the year.Show more
#4 - Cliffs of Moher Coastal Trail
Ennistymon, County Clare, Ireland
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(150)
Length: 15.5 mi • Est. 8 h 8 m
Rising over 200m above sea level, the Cliffs of Moher are one of Ireland's most popular tourist destination. This coastal walk begins at the visitors centre and follows the coastline to Doolin. From the coast, you can see the Aran Islands, mountain ranges to the north, and Loop Head to the south. Keep your eyes peeled for sea life off the coast - many visitors see seals, dolphins, whales, and more.Show more
#5 - Coumshingaun Lough Loop
Ballydurn, County Waterford, Ireland
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(237)
Length: 4.3 mi • Est. 2 h 44 m
Note: Clockwise direction recommended. If you go anti-clockwise, there is a fairly steep scramble that you must go down, which is more difficult than going up.Show more
#6 - Glendalough 'White' Route from Visitor Center
Wicklow Mountains National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(135)
Length: 7.8 mi • Est. 4 h 27 m
A beautiful loop trail that covers road, scramble and boardwalk walking. The views are absolutely spectacular, but quick changes in the weather are a stern reminder that things can get nasty fast for those unprepared. Good hiking boots and rain gear are a must. The trail itself is excellently maintained and well signposted. For those looking to shave a few minutes off the route, you could easily park at the upper car park rather than the visitor centre and cut out the monastic ruins and some flat boardwalk.Show more
#7 - Croagh Patrick Pilgrim Trail
Newport, County Mayo, Ireland
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(164)
Length: 4.4 mi • Est. 3 h 26 m
The climb to Croagh Patrick is a difficult one but is well worth the challenge. The views from the top are spectacular. This is an old pilgrim route and popular with all kinds of walkers. The trail is rocky and requires proper footwear. The weather can be unpredictable, so bring layers and be prepared for cloudy conditions. Show more
#8 - Dublin Mountains Loop Trail
Tallaght, County Dublin, Ireland
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(121)
Length: 12.2 mi • Est. 6 h 33 m
It is, perhaps, not fully appreciated how rich the Dublin Mountains are in ancient monuments, some of which date back thousands of years. This guide describes a circular route around the northern fringes of the Dublin mountains, taking in three different types of ancient monument, dating variously from the Neolithic (late Stone Age) and Bronze Ages. Wedge tombs are the most common form of ancient monuments in Ireland and are found throughout the country. They are so-called because of their shape: wide at the entrance and then narrowing and sloping down towards the back with one or more chambers within. Passage tombs are the best known type of tomb on account of the famous one at Newgrange. There are many more such tombs in Ireland, although most of them are much smaller. They still conform to the same basic design, however: a long passage leading to a central chamber. Chambered cairns are the simplest form of monument, consisting of a burial chamber called a cist surrounded by a mound or cairn of stones.Show more
#9 - Diamond Hill Loop
Connemara National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(145)
Length: 4.5 mi • Est. 2 h 42 m
#10 - Wicklow Way (Complete)
Marlay Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(51)
Length: 80.1 mi • Est. Multi-day
The Wicklow Way is a long distance walking route that starts in Marlay Park and finishes in the village of Clonegal, Co. Carlow. It is the oldest such route in Ireland, having opened in 1981. It was originally devised in 1966 by J.B. Malone, an author who wrote a regular column on hillwalking for the Evening Herald newspaper. The Wicklow Way forms part of the European long-distance walking route E8 that runs from Dursey Head, County Cork, Ireland to Turkey. The first stage, between Marlay Park and Knockree in the Glencree Valley is approximately 20km long. It starts amid the pleasant surroundings of Marlay Park in the south suburbs of Dublin before ascending Kilmashogue Mountain where panoramic views of Dublin can be enjoyed before the trail passes over the top of Kelly's Glen and into the Glencullen Valley. The city is quickly left behind as the vista of the Dublin and Wicklow mountains opens up for the first time. The trail descends into the Glencullen Valley near Tibradden Mountain and follows the road to the hamlet of Bornaraltry. The path then begins the ascent of the southern side of the Glencullen Valley, climbing towards Prince William's Seat. Close to Prince William's Seat, near a rocky tor known as Raven's Rock, the trail reaches the Glencree Valley, leaving County Dublin and entering County Wicklow. It descends into the valley through Curtlestown Wood before passing along the side of Knockree, a solitary hill sitting in the middle of the valley.Show more
Showing results 1 - 10 of 756