Best trails in Durrow, County Laois

62 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Durrow, County Laois? AllTrails has 5 great hiking trails, walking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. You'll also find some great local park options, like Lough Boora Discovery Park or Killinthomas Wood. Ready for some activity? There are 3 moderate trails in Durrow ranging from 9 to 15.4 miles and from 269 to 695 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Durrow, County Laois
Top trails (5)
#1 - Durrow Leafy Circular
Durrow, County Laois, Ireland
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Length: 13.3 mi • Est. 6 h 32 m
Enjoy a full loop around the Durrow valley. The Leafy Loop around Durrow is a good 5.5 to 6.5 hour walk. it climbs to The Ballagh and will require good health and good boots. It's a glorious walk through forests, by rivers, up hills to oversee the valley, and down into the charming village of Durrow itself. The Leafy Loop is a longer version of the Dunmore Loop walk which follow the same route until a divergence just before Clonageera House on the other side of the village. You get to see many of the fine sights along the way then climb to see the magnificent valley. It's an extra 4+ miles, but if you're fit, it is well worth it. This walk is well signposted with a variety of posts along the way. Purple arrows indicate the signs for the Leafy Loop and have been placed with thought and care by people who are keen to keep you on the right path at all times.Show more
#2 - Dunmore Loop Walk
Durrow, County Laois, Ireland
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Length: 9.0 mi • Est. 4 h 21 m
A fine walk through forest and over river in the heart of Ireland. The Dunmore Loop is a shorter version of the Leafy Loop walk which follow the same route until a divergence just before Clonageera House on the other side of the village. You get to see many of the fine sights along the way without the trek up the heartbreaking stretch known as the Ballagh! This walk is well signposted with a variety of posts along the way. Bright green arrows indicate the signs for the Dunmore Loop and have been placed with thought and care by people who are keen to keep you on the right path at all times.Show more
#3 - Durrow Heritage Walking Tour
Durrow, County Laois, Ireland
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Length: 1.2 mi • Est. 32 m
The village of Durrow is small, but perfectly formed with a rich history and an active community keen to ensure you enjoy your time here. This heritage tour starts at Castle Durrow and takes you past a very special organ, the Square, the old bridge, the vintage bicycle museum, the mills memorial, the unique Fawlty's pub, the 'magical' water pump, Tae Lane and Chapel street before returning back to the castle. The earliest record of Durrow dates back to 546A.D. when the village - then called Dervagh, was the site of a monastery, founded by St. Columb. The earliest recorded church in the village was in 1155 when records show that a raiding party led by O'Loughlin burned the church at Darmhagh-Ua-nDuach (Durrow in Odagh, or Castle Durrow) to the ground. By the mid-13th Century an urban tradition had been established as Durrow (then called Deverald) became a Norman Borough Village and was granted an urban constitution to attract settlers. In 1245, the village was given the right to hold a week long fair in the third week of July and a market every Thursday. Parish maps show that in the mid 17th Century, Durrow was a parochial hamlet with eight 'surrounds' and was owned by the powerful Ormondes. By 1659 a total of 105 families lived in the area. Sir William Petty's 1685 Map shows that there was both a Catholic and Protestant Church in the village. The Catholic Church - which probably consisted of mud walls with a thatched roof, stood on the site of, or close to, the old Courthouse (now a library and cultural centre). Under the Ormonde Family, Durrow was annexed to County Kilkenny and was only returned to County Laois in 1846 by an Act of Parliament. The physical form of the village as seen today, largely results from the great influence of Viscount of Ashbrook, William Flower, M.P. for Portarlington and local landlord who, throughout the 18th Century oversaw the construction of a planned estate village. Durrow's present form is indebted to the Flower Family, Viscounts Ashbrook, who gained ownership of the town in the early 1700s. They built Castle Durrow and granted permits for many of the fine Georgian and Victorian houses that still line Durrow's streets. Over the next two centuries, Durrow prospered. Stagecoaches rattled over the old bridge and stopped at the nearby coach house, the Ashbrook Arms. In its heyday, the village had its own brewery, a flour mill, a malting enterprise and a factory that made high quality bricks and tiles. We'll tell you more about these as you walk along. In recent years the local community has worked hard to preserve Durrow's beautiful setting, as well as its architecture. See for yourself on this leisurely stroll down Durrow's fine streets. Show more
#4 - South Laois Bike Tour
Durrow, County Laois, Ireland
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Length: 15.4 mi • Est. 7 h 35 m
Take a bicycle around this memorable countryside trail. Affectionately known as the 'Elephant and Castle Trail'. Why the curious name? Well if you look closely enough at the outline of the route, you'll notice that it resembles an elephant's head complete with a trunk! Experience the chance to ride a High Nelly bicycle through some rolling countryside that skirts along the Laois/Kilkenny border. Take in two of the most original museums in the country with two of the most charismatic curators you'll ever meet. Stop and see one of the best known holy wells in the country and marvel at one of the best gardens up in Heywood House. On top of that, you'll be riding through forests, over the Nore river (several times in fact) and taking an outdoor swim into a bygone age that you'll long to return to after the cycling ends.Show more
#5 - Castle Durrow Grounds Walking Tour
Durrow, County Laois, Ireland
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Length: 1.0 mi • Est. 28 m
A leisurely stroll around a castle with a rich history. Built in 1712, Castle Durrow has been called 'a piece of Irish history embodied in stone'. Approximately 90 minutes from Dublin on the Dublin-Cork M8 motorway in County Laois, the magnificent building stands in a commanding position in the centre of Durrow village overlooking the beautiful river Erkina. Following Castle Durrow's purchase in 1998 by Peter and Shelley Stokes, the castle has been transformed into an elegant 48-bedroomed country house hotel unlike any in Ireland. Set amid 30 acres of manicured gardens, woodlands, orchards and paddocks, Castle Durrow is a unique fusion of Queen Anne, Victorian and Georgian styles. Take a walk around its grounds taking in the best that the castle has to offer with the walk passing by the river, the 'kissing tree', the herb garden and the 'Good South' garden. Coupled with this fine scenery is a compelling story of the previous owners and of the area itself. Show more