Best parks in Hawaii

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Explore the most popular parks in Hawaii with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of trails in Hawaii
Best parks (114)
#1 - Haleakala National Park
Maui, Hawaii
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Explore cinder cones and old lava flows from within Haleakala, possibly the largest dormant volcano on the planet. Formed by erosion rather than volcanic activity, the valley at the summit of Haleakala boasts much to marvel at and the packed cinder and soil underfoot makes for a relatively easy hike. Here you'll find the silversword, an endangered plant found nowhere else on Earth with an alien appearance that compounds the other-worldly appearance of this remote location. Ascending and looping up the mountain, the road to Haleakala National Park is equally spectacular, climbing through the clouds to the summit. Watch out for tour groups of cyclists on this road who freewheel down the mountain. These popular tours begin in the early hours of the morning so they can witness the sunrise over the island from the summit before they begin their two-wheeled kamikaze return back down the volcano. The park is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, except during severe weather closures, and limited staffing situations. For visitor center hours, see here: https://www.nps.gov/hale/planyourvisit/hours.htm DAILY PASSES Daily passes are non-transferable and are valid for 3 days including the date of purchase. Private Vehicle: $30. Valid for 3 days. Admits private, non-commercial vehicle (14 max capacity or less) and all occupants to Haleakalā National Park including both the Summit and Kīpahulu Areas. Motorcycle: $25. Valid for 3 days. Admits a private, non-commercial motorcycle to Haleakalā National Park including both the Summit and Kīpahulu Areas. Per Person: $15. Valid for 3 days. Admits one individual with no car to Haleakalā National Park including both the Summit and Kīpahulu Areas - typically used for bicyclists, hikers and pedestrians. Youth 15 and under are admitted free. Commercial Organized Groups: Haleakalā National Park charges commercial entities a fee to enter the park based on the capacity of the vehicle and/or the activity the commercial groups offer in the park. For a list of current authorized tours operating in the park, please click here. $15 per person for non-road based organized groups that offer activities such as Astronomy and Hiking. $30 plus $15 per person for road based tour vehicles, such as sedans, with a passenger carrying capacity of 1-7 people. $45 for road based tour vehicles, such as large vans and mini buses, with a passenger carrying capacity of 8-25 people. Non-Commercial Organized Groups Valid for 3 days. Organized groups such as Scouts, Rotary, Clubs, Youth Groups, Churches, Reunions, etc. that do not qualify for Educational Fee Waivers are charged as follows: $30 Non-commercial vehicles with a vehicle capacity of 14 or less. $15 per person Non-commercial vehicles with a capacity of 15 or greater. Fees will not exceed the commercial fee for the same-sized vehicle. Youth 15 and under are free. Individuals or families with any valid Annual or Lifetime pass may use their pass for entry at the per person rate. Pass and photo ID must be present upon entry. Show more
#2 - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Hawaii, Hawaii
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Without volcanoes there would be no Hawaii. Fortunately for the world, Hawaii's volcanoes continue to produce their famous molten lava, which results in a growing mass of paradise in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. One of the most spectacular spots to witness this natural miracle in action is on the Big Island of Hawaii at Volcanoes National Park, where two active volcanoes (Mauna Loa and Kilauea) regularly spout ash clouds, smoke and hot lava into the sea. Visitors can hike around the park and experience an incredible range of microclimates and sites, from rain forests to eerie lava tubes to spectacular views of the ocean. Volcanic activity is responsible for a new island that is currently being created in Hawaii, which would bring the total number of islands to 9 in the state's chain. Just off the southern coast of the Big Island is Loihi, an underwater volcano that has been erupting since 1996. The new island is scheduled to break the ocean's surface in about 250,000 years, so we have a while before we need to book our reservations. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is open 7 days a week, 24 hours a day including holidays. However, the Kahuku Unit is only open on Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. For Visitor Center hours, see here: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/hours.htm ENTRANCE FEES - Effective January 1, 2020 $30.00 per private non-commercial vehicle (capacity 15 or less) - 7 days $15.00 per pedestrian or bicycle - 7 days $25.00 per motorcycle - 7 days $55.00 Hawai‘i Tri-park Annual Pass Accessibility: Accessible trails and facilities information for those with disabilities or using strollers can be found here: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm#:~:text=Currently%20the%20K%C4%ABlauea%20Visitor%20Center,Art%20Center%20are%20wheelchair%20accessible.&text=The%20short%20gravel%20trail%20(0.1,possible%20for%20wheelchairs%20to%20traverse.Show more
#3 - Koko Crater Regional Park
Oahu, Hawaii
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Looking for a great trail in Koko Crater Regional Park, Oahu? AllTrails has 5 great hiking trails, views trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 2 moderate trails in Koko Crater Regional Park ranging from 0.9 to 1.7 miles and from 0 to 1,036 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!Show more
#4 - Diamond Head State Monument
Oahu, Hawaii
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Explore the most popular trails in Diamond Head State Monument with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.Show more
#5 - Kuliouou Forest Reserve
Oahu, Hawaii
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Looking for a great trail in Kuliouou Forest Reserve, Oahu? AllTrails has 7 great hiking trails, walking trails, views trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Gearing up for a challenge? There are 4 hard trails in Kuliouou Forest Reserve ranging from 2.6 to 5.5 miles and from 262 to 2,408 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!Show more
#6 - Koke'e State Park
Kauai, Hawaii
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Koke'e State Park is an incredible location situated along Kauai's west coast, right near the Na Pali Coast. The vegetation is lush, the views are incredible, and the trails are plentiful. Nature lovers will also find native plants, forest birds, and interesting insects. The park offers great views of the Waimea Canyon as well. There is tent camping onsite for those looking to stay the night.Show more
#7 - Ahupua'a O Kahana State Park
Oahu, Hawaii
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Ahupua'a O Kahana State Park is a popular park on the windward side of Oahu. The park is in one of the wettest valleys on the island, but the lush forests and views make up for it. The park is free to enter, and dogs are allowed on leash. There is camping at the park for a small fee. The park is a "living park" which means there are Hawaiian families that still live in the park. There are quite a few interesting cultural/archeological sites in the park including a temple, fishing shrines, stone buildings, and much more.Show more
#8 - Kailua Beach Park
Oahu, Hawaii
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Explore the most popular trails in Kailua Beach Park with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.Show more
#9 - West Maui Forest Reserve
Maui, Hawaii
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Explore the most popular trails in West Maui Forest Reserve with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.Show more
#10 - Ka'ena Point State Park
Oahu, Hawaii
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This park is a beautiful, rugged coastline on the western coast of Oahu. There are many opportunities to hike, fish, and picnic here. If you have an off-road vehicle you can also apply for a permit to drive in this park. There is no fee to enter the park. Beware there is little shade, and no drinking water on site.Show more
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