Best dogs no trails in Hawaii

38,489 Reviews
Explore the most popular no dogs trails in Hawaii with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of dogs no trails in Hawaii
Top trails (209)
#1 - Koko Crater Tramway to Kokohead Lookout
Koko Crater Regional Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(4032)
Length: 1.8 mi • Est. 43 m
This is a steep climb to the top of Koko Head Crater with spectacular panoramic views of the east Honolulu shoreline. The 1000 plus step-like walking track consists of abandoned railroad ties that run along the crater's west side to the top of Koko Crater. The military used them previously during World War II as part of an incline tram to transport supplies to a lookout post at the summit. A short drive from Diamond Head and Waikiki, this popular hiking trail can be accessed at Koko Head Park in Hawaii Kai. This is a great workout with a beautiful view at the summit - don't forget to bring water! Visitors might also be interested in the Koko Crater Botanical Garden which can be accessed inside the crater. Visitors can drive around the crater to the opposite side to access the gardens. Show more
#2 - Diamond Head (Le'ahi) Summit Trail
Diamond Head State Monument
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(3784)
Length: 1.8 mi • Est. 1 h 2 m
As of December 29, 2020, this trail is only open Thursdays - Sundays. The last entrance to hike the trail is at 4:30 pm. The gates are locked at 6:00 pm daily and all visitors must be out of the park by this time. The Diamond Head Summit trail hike is likely the most popular hike in Oahu, and for good reason. While fairly steep, this easy hike starts from the middle of the Diamond Head volcanic crater and climbs about 500 feet up the side to the top of the rim where panoramic views await. Diamond Head State Monument encompasses over 475 acres, including the interior and outer slopes of the crater. The Diamond Head crater is more than 3,500 feet in diameter and is part of the Hawaiian volcano chain from more than a half million years ago (don't worry, it has been dormant for at least 150,000 years now). The crater is also called "Le'ahi," which means "brow of the tuna" in Hawaiian. It got the name Diamond Head almost 200 years ago when British sailors believed there were diamonds in the side of the crater. Although none were found, the name stuck. The trail was built in 1908 as part of the Oahu coastal defense system. The World War II bunkers on top now support antennas used by the government. The trail starts on a paved path before climbing several steep switchbacks leading to the first set of steep stairs. After the stairs you will climb through a tunnel and then climb up another set of stairs before reaching the bunkers at the top of the rim. Once on top you can climb up to the top of the bunkers for 360-degree views of the island and Pacific Ocean, with Waikiki not too far away.Show more
#3 - Olomana Trail
Mount Olomana State Monument
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1611)
Length: 4.4 mi • Est. 2 h 45 m
Please note: There is no parking area at the trailhead - the map shown here will direct you to street parking and you can walk to the trailhead from there. Users have reported that there are towing operations in the area. It is not clear where the legal parking is, so park at your own risk. Located in Kailua, on the windward side of Oahu, Olomana Trail (three peaks) is a strenuous hike with amazing views if you can make it to the top. The trail can be accessed from the intersection of Maunawili Road and Auloa Road off of Pali Highway. The first peak, Mount Olomana, is about 1.5 miles up with steep drop-offs on both sides and takes about an hour and a half to get to. Toward the top there are some rock climbing elements. The top of the first peak offers 360 degree views. It is steep on the downhill slope towards the second peak. The next peak isn't as challenging but still has an excellent view. The last peak should only be tried by experienced hikers in good shape and requires ropes all the way up. To return to your car you must go back the same way you came. This a favorite hike in Oahu, however can be very challenging with all of the up/down.Show more
#4 - Ka'au Crater
Round Top Forest Reserve
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1505)
Length: 7.3 mi • Est. 4 h 26 m
This site is open to the public although it is on privately owned land. The route can be confusing so you may want to download the offline map before you go. The trailhead is cleverly hidden behind the mailboxes on left of the road at the end of Waiomao Road which is a right turn off of 10th Street. You will see the hand-lettered sign on the tree behind the mailboxes and the trail starts DOWN from there. This hike is challenging and can be slippery and dangerous. If you don't know how to navigate in the outdoors you should consider another trail that is well-marked OR hike the trail in a counter-clockwise route as far as the waterfall and return the way you came. This is an amazing hike with three waterfalls and gorgeous views of Honolulu, Kaneohe, Kailua, Diamond Head, and Ka'au Crater. This hike is not too challenging until the 3rd waterfall which you climb up to get to the ridge portion of the hike. This is where it got extremely muddy and a bit dangerous. The view from the top of the ridge is incredible! Pack more food and water than you think you'd need, it's very steep and tiring.Show more
#5 - Pipiwai Trail and Waimoku Falls
Haleakala National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1146)
Length: 3.4 mi • Est. 1 h 55 m
A unique and very special waterfall hike where your adventures begin even before you reach the trailhead. A favorite Maui hike, yet for some people the drive to the trailhead alone is excitement enough. The Hana Highway is sixty miles of scenic but curvy coastal road, reportedly featuring 620 curves and 59 bridges, most of which are single-lane bridges. If you relish your driving experiences then the Hana Highway alone is a "must-do". The round trip to the falls and back takes in several great waterfalls before reaching the spectacular Waimoku Falls, and a boardwalk journey through dense, dark bamboo forest that you're unlikely to forget. Show more
#6 - Hanakapi'ai Falls Trail
Na Pali Coast State Wilderness Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1013)
Length: 7.0 mi • Est. 3 h 50 m
NOTE: Advance reservations are now required for all visitors (except state of Hawaiʻi residents). Please see state park website for reservations and information https://www.gohaena.com/ The first 2 miles is a moderate hike to Hanakapiai Beach. From there it is another 2 strenuous miles to the falls. The trail is very muddy and slippery during the first mile. Hollywood is a big fan of this Hawaiian island's spectacular landscape, which is why it's a popular filming location for movies like Raiders of the Lost Ark and Jurassic Park. Like most trails on Kauai, the route up to the falls is quite rugged and usually quite slippery. This route should not be attempted during or immediately after a heavy rainfall.Show more
#7 - Kilauea Iki Trail and Crater Rim Trail
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1059)
Length: 3.0 mi • Est. 1 h 40 m
Great day hike down into and across a solid lava lake in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Klauea Iki Trail starts in the rain forest on the crater's rim. The trail descends 400 feet through the rain forest to the crater floor. Hikers will cross the still-steaming crater floor, past the gaping throat of the vent that built Pu'u Pua'i cinder cone, and return to your starting point via the crater's rim. Highlights: Rain forest, birds, insects, 1959 lava lake, steam vents, cinder and spatter cone. https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/hike_day_craterrim.htmShow more
#8 - Canyon Trail to Waipoo Falls
Koke'e State Park
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Length: 3.2 mi • Est. 2 h 6 m
#9 - Crouching Lion
Ahupua'a O Kahana State Park
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Length: 0.4 mi • Est. 18 m
This trail is steep and has some patches of dirt and loose rock near the top. There’s a more wooded path that you can choose to go up or down near the other end of the parking lot. Beautiful views at the top! But be careful as it can be very dangerous when wet! Do not park along Trout Farm Road, as your car could get towed. Instead, park at Swanzy Beach Park. Show more
#10 - Ka'ena Point Trail (from South)
Ka'ena Point State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(736)
Length: 5.6 mi • Est. 2 h 33 m
As of February 2021, the road leading to the hiking trail remains closed so you must park along the road leading up to Yokohama Bay. This will add approximately 2.2km/1 mile to the hike out to the nature reserve at the midway point of the hike and on return to your vehicle where you can either walk along the beach or on the paved road until you reach the trailhead. Be careful leaving valuables in your car and when parking along the road outside the park your car must not be parked over the white lines on the side of the road. Cars are ticketed if you are over the white line. Drive down the road until you can find a spot that gets your car entirely on the other side of the white line. There are no signs warning you of this law and you will be ticketed. This is a very easy-basic trail good for kids of all ages, dogs, families, etc. The trail is mostly uncovered so make sure to bring water and sunscreen. Cross trainer shoes are good for the hike. Sandals are also ok if you don’t mind a few rocks in your shoes. There is almost no elevation change and the hike is not technical. There are several coves where you can descend the rock formation and get closer to the water. Be careful during high tide as the waves break on the rocks. Additionally, there are several calm water pools at the tip of the island…great for swimming and photos.Show more
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