Explore the most popular Cities in Nouvelle-Aquitaine with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

Books are written on this 1000 year old trail in Spain and Europe. Borrow a guide. Not wilderness, but a life pilgrimage.

Awesome experience, we did the last 100 + Km from Sarria

2 months ago

Amazing hike! Has a bit of everything - Bush, paddock, rock and scramble. Fantastic views. Steep and relentless incline. Would recommend for experienced hikers only. Took us 3 hours to the peak.

hiking
2 months ago

Worth every challenge along The Way. Highly recommended for anyone who’s eager to get in touch with oneself, friends you just haven’t met before and beautiful scenery in North Spain.

Trip of a lifetime.

backpacking
2 months ago

2017. End of June - July. Walked the camino with daughter. It was wonderful! Strenuous, hot, foggy, rain, perfect weather. Will do again!

a nice walk but you could park much closer to the trail.

Such an amazing experience! Great way to begin long distance hiking.

Love it!! Great views, great and super friendly locals, superb pilgrim company!!!

4 months ago

My third Camino

Nice walk

A life changing religious and spiritual experience!

Life changing trek.

An outstanding one of a lifetime experience, we will do it again, so much emotions, met so many folks, fortunately we had a mini version of “The Way.” Amazing!!!..

The hills and rocks and heat in summer are all much more challenging than you might expect. The Camino Frances is also one of the most rewarding experiences you’ll ever have.

A life experience.

It’s been 2 years since we walked the Camino, and flash backs to the joy we experienced always pops into our heads. My how you enjoy experiences so much more when 3 out of 4 in our group would never have 40 years ago been around at our ages 67,68,&70 if it were not for those dedicated, skillful and confident medical doctors we have today. Thanks to all.

I, together with my grandson, hiked the Camino from St. Jean, France to Santiago in the Spring of 2016. His ability to converse in Spanish was very helpful, as we made numerous friends with Spanish hikers who did not speak English. For many, myself included, the walk carried rich religious connotations. Pilgrims have been walking the Camino by the hundreds of thousands for well over a thousand years, and numbers are only now approaching what they were in earlier centuries.

I have thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail, and this is an entirely different experience, being culturally oriented rather than nature oriented. Also, no need for a tent, sleeping gear other than a sleeping bag liner, or cooking gear. Once you obtain your Pilgrim's Passport, you can stay cheaply at numerous hostels (albergues) and purchase pilgrim meals. Many hikers who lack the five weeks needed, section hike the Camino over several years. This is easy to do, as the trail bisects numerous towns with public transit, and small villages have taxi service.

Suggestions:
- learn some simple Spanish phrases, like "where is the bathroom?"
- attend a meeting of Friends of the Camino if there is a chapter nearby.
- smaller the pack the better, as one tends to fill whatever size one uses. A full pack should not exceed 10 percent of body weight.
- get John Brierley's guide book, "A Pilgrim's Guide to the Camino de Santiago".

Buen Camino!

Wednesday, November 01, 2017

I just got home and I am stilling feeling a Camino glow! I loved the variety of terrain, walking in morning darkness, meeting kind people, viewing history on the spot, and the easy to follow trail. While it did not involve tent camping, I did carry a backpack with a sleeping bag, clothes and supplies and hiked for an average of 15 miles a day. As the terrain changed from mountains to mesas to forest we experienced hot days in the sun to cold rain while walking through clouds. I feel that this trail offers great opportunities for inner reflection as well as a practice step towards longer through hikes. Spain is beautiful and the Camino Frances is a great way to get introduced to this country.
I found the frequent coffee bars made it easy to hike without lugging a lot of food and water. The albergues (dorm-like hostels for pilgrims on the Camino) were easy to find and assured a place to shower and sleep each night. There are laundry sinks and clothes lines available at most hostel stops, some even have washers and dryers.
Medieval towns and villages dot the Camino map, where beautiful countryside is populated by cows, horses, and sheep which make an enchanted backdrop for this point-to-point hike.
Some walk days are long, flat, and hot while others (the Pyrenees Mountains, Rabanal, and O’Cebreiro) were steep and sometimes had long, rocky descents.
I loved this walk and will return...or try one of the other many Caminos there are in Europe...all leading to Santiago de Compostela.

backpacking
Sunday, October 29, 2017

Cried, laughed, prayed! Hands down...favorite part of my life. Hard as hell but would do it all over again in a heartbeat. Bien Camino

hiking
Thursday, October 19, 2017

Best thing I have ever done for myself.

hiking
Monday, October 16, 2017

Best and favorite experience of my entire life.

I recorded each day, so take a peek at my recordings if you're interested in seeing the daily routes. If a day is missing, it's because I didn't walk that day (I was sick for 75% of my walk, so had to take a couple days off!). Buen Camino!

Friday, October 06, 2017

Awesome!!! I did it twice!!!

hiking
Sunday, September 03, 2017

It's unforgettable

hiking
Sunday, September 03, 2017

An easy two hour walk in the country side

hiking
Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The place Francis Dupayrat, which is this loop's meeting point, is a lookout on the pre-Pyrenean hills of Chalosse. The fragmented fields remind the visitor that this region is historically located in a country of sharecropping. The route descends from the west towards the Louts below and borrows the Chalosse greenway linking Dax to Mugron. After the flood grove, the hiker easily goes uphill back to the starting belvedere.

Topo-Guide: Rando Guide n°4 (Haute Chalosse)) édité par le CG40

hiking
Saturday, October 29, 2016

Another route starting from Bougue. A path that connects Bougue and Laglorieuse, first by the east and back by the west, between forest and fields. The hiker will borrow a small portion of the greenway between Mont-de-Marsan and Gabarret. Topo-Guide: Rando Guide n°10 (Marsan) édité par le CG40

hiking
Friday, October 28, 2016

From the village of Banos located on a hillside overlooking the Gabas, the hiker crosses corn fields by a sunken path that leads through a forest with various species. Then the route joins Montaut and its viewpoint over the Adour valley and Gabas valley. The return to Banos goes north, takes the old railway of Chalosse, and ends with a climb to the initial promontory. Topo-Guide: Rando Guide n°2 (Chalosse) édité par le CG40

hiking
Sunday, October 02, 2016

Located on the northern edge of the Upper Chalosse and at the confluence of the Gabas creek and the Adour river, the small village of Toulouzette is the launching point of this hike in the riparian and wetland zone formed by the Adour river. A pond where one can observe mallards, little egrets; then an oxbow lake, then the Adour river. Hikers will then head south and cross the cultivated plateau between the Adour river and the Gabas creek. After crossing the Gabas, the route follows the green path of Chalosse on the hillside of Montaut before joining Toulouzette. Topo-Guide: Rando Guide n°4 (Haute Chalosse) édité par le CG40

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