Escalante River Trail: Escalante to UT-12

INTERMÉDIAIRE 8 avis

Escalante River Trail: Escalante to UT-12 est un sentier de point à point de 12.9 miles peu fréquenté situé près de Eggnog, Utah. Le sentier longe une rivière et sa difficulté est évaluée comme modérée. Le sentier offre plusieurs activités.

Distance: 12.9 miles Dénivelé: 875 feet Type d'itinéraire: Point A à point B

randonnée sac-à-dos

camping

randonnée

forêt

rivière

vue panoramique

fleurs sauvages

faune

rocheux

neige

The Escalante River flows through Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, which offers a wide variety of hiking opportunities. There are miles of maze-like, winding, and intersecting canyons that lead to the Escalante River. The canyons take on many different characters--from narrow and deep slot canyons that slice through sandstone like large cracks, to narrow drainages that follow the serpentine erosion trail of years of past floods, to wide open canyons with sandy bottoms and cottonwood trees. Most hiking is along streambeds; many are dry, with year-round pools of water (pot holes). The potholes may be shallow, or deep enough to require a swim to get across. Other canyons are wide with water that flows more regularly. Whenever you are in such canyon country, flash flooding is a danger. This area should not be explored without detailed U.S.G.S. maps, available at the National Park Service office in Escalante. Maps of the entire region are available at the Escalante BLM office next door. The Experience Descending into any such maze of canyons, you feel small. This is not like the famous Grand Canyon, which overwhelms with its size. It is much more intimate. You are close to the forces of nature, seeing the power of erosion in the striped, often smooth and undulating, wavy sandstone walls that close in on you and then widen again. At times, the cool walls are close enough to rub against your shoulders. Choke stones, boulders that have fallen from cliffs high above, lodge themselves into the canyons and provide for interesting and challenging obstacles through the canyons. In some areas, the sandy bottom of the canyon is littered with large pieces of petrified wood, making for natural stairs. The deeper you go into the narrows, the cooler the temperatures get. It is like exploring a cave with a permanent skylight. Vegetation within the wider canyons brings bright green contrast to the red rock walls and blue sky. Season The best time to hike the Escalante River are late March through June and early September through October. Weather conditions and water temperatures are generally most favorable during this period. It is impossible to predict weather conditions in the Escalante River area very far in advance. If current information about river conditions is desired, contact the BLM or NPS offices in Escalante. River Conditions Most of the Escalante River itself is slow and shallow, with depths ranging from ankle to knee-deep. Some deeper water occurs at the lower end, especially in the narrows above Coyote Gulch. Water depth may be considerably higher during spring runoff or after heavy rainstorms. Do not attempt to make water crossings during severe flooding. The river must be crossed many times so canvas shoes or boots are suggested. Some of the side canyons (Death Hollow, Sand Creek, Boulder Creek, and The Gulch) have sections of narrows that may require deep wading or swimming. Normally, there is not enough water to float the Escalante River. However, depending on spring runoff, it may be possible for a short period of time. Spring runoff can occur any time from April to late May. Contact the BLM office for more information.  Permits Hikers can obtain a free backcountry hiking permit at the BLM or NPS office in Escalante. Permits can also be filled out at various trailhead register boxes at the beginning of a hike. The information from this permit will be used to determine visitor use and will aid in search and rescue efforts in the event of an emergency. Always let someone know your itinerary before hiking the backcountry. It is advisable to hike with at least one other person. Special Use Permits--Commercial trips and organized groups (scout troops, schools, clubs, etc.) must obtain a special use permit prior to the proposed trip or event in this area. Contact the appropriate agency or agencies (BLM, NPS, or FS) in Escalante for further permit information. Group Size--It is recommended that group sizes be limited to 12 individuals when hiking on BLM lands. There is a group size limit of 12 when hiking within the Glen Canyon N.R.A. Hiking There are very few developed or maintained hiking trails along the Escalante River and its side canyons; however, a number of intermittent pathways have become established in some areas from continued use over the years. Most hikes involve personal route selection, which generally follows along the course of the main river canyon or side canyon and usually includes wading in the streambed, walking along pathways across the river benches, and making frequent water crossings. Some side canyons may require deep wading, boulder hopping, and an occasional swim. Other side canyons are dry, and carrying additional water may be a necessity.  When hiking in well-traveled areas where established trails exist, stay on the main trail to avoid creating unnecessary multiple tr

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3 months ago

I highly recommend this hike. It is lovely and follows the Escalante River. We did not see one other person, amazing. The trailhead is across the highway from the parking lot. There is a path to take that goes under the highway and leads you to the trailhead.

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3 months ago

We hiked 4 miles in to the amphitheater. Easy trail with numerous river crossings. But you don’t have to get wet. Beautiful canyon walls all the way

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Sat Sep 02 2017