Best trails in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire

327 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Huddersfield, West Yorkshire? AllTrails has 15 great hiking trails, trail running trails, walking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails around Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Kinder Scout National Nature Reserve or Hope Valley. Ready for some activity? There are 12 moderate trails in Huddersfield ranging from 4.6 to 25.2 miles and from 305 to 1,952 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire
Top trails (15)
#1 - Marsden Moor Walk
Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England
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Length: 8.4 mi • Est. 4 h 19 m
A trail that takes in some beautiful scenery (from canalside to open moorland) and visits locations associated with local Poets (past and present) who have lived or worked near Marsden. More about this trail and excerpts of poems from featured Poets can be found on the GPX file and in detail on my blog: https://halfwayhike.com/marsden-poetry-trail/ [Mark Kelly] Show more
#2 - Armitage Bridge and Beaumont Park Circular
Shibden Park
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Length: 4.3 mi • Est. 1 h 43 m
Enjoy this 6.9km trail around Armitage Bridge and Beaumont Park. This ride provides a beautiful walk with manageable terrain for the most part and it is also suitable for dogs on leash. Part of the trails goes through private farms on one downside so you will need to be careful. The route has plenty of original forests what gives visitors lots of epic moments while enjoying the beautiful wildlife. Plenty of facilities at the beginning of the walk, car park and toilets. It's perfect balance of hills and scenery.Show more
#3 - Almondbury and Castle Hill
Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England
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Length: 12.6 mi • Est. 6 h 44 m
This area comes under the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees and includes Holmfirth, Denby Dale, Marsden as well as Huddersfield and consists of rolling countryside at the foot of the Pennines with steep-sided wooded valleys. The name ‘Kirklees’ was chosen after Kirklees Priory, the legendary burial place of Robin Hood. Almondbury in its early history was more important, with references in the Doomsday  Book, than was Huddersfield 2 miles away. On Westgate is the 16th c. Wormald’s Hall the sole survivor of a row of such properties. The date of 1631 over the doorway refers to when it was renovated - the lower part being rebuilt in stone. It was actually built 100 years earlier, it now serves as the Almonbury Conservative Club. Almondbury Common is reputed to be the last place that Bull-Baiting took place on 2nd August 1824. The cruelty to animals act was passed by parliament in 1835 which banned  all animal baiting. Castle Hill is an impressive example of an ancient Iron Age Hill Fort which dates back 4,000 years. On top of the hill stands Victoria Tower built in 1897 to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. Pursuits recored at Castle Hill include bare-knuckled prize fights, dogfights and cockfights. The village of Farnley Tyas was also mentioned in the Doomsday Book and is now a select residential area. ‘Tyas’ is a family name from 13 c. who owned land in the area. On your route, you'll came across some waymarkers entitled ‘Moly Mangle’s Meander’. These refer to Kirkburton Parish Walk of some 4 miles connecting together various hamlets. The story goes that ‘Molly’ was the only lady in Thurstonland who owned a mangle in the 19th century. The start of a poem about her starts thus - "Here stands I, Molly Mangle, And there’s now’t I know that I can’t handle, You’ll often see me with a sack, Of people’s washing on my back."Show more
#4 - Marsden Walking Tour
Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England
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Length: 6.1 mi • Est. 3 h 20 m
#5 - Marsden moor and Wessenden Reservoir
Peak District National Park
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Length: 7.2 mi • Est. 2 h 54 m
#6 - Penistone Line: Shepley Hills and Higglers
Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England
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Length: 5.8 mi • Est. 3 h 8 m
This is a linear walk from Shepley rail station to Stocksmoor rail station in West Yorkshire, enjoying the beautiful rolling countryside. You will discover the textile industrial heritage of Shepley, where tailors known as Higglers once thrived. Leaving Shepley, the walk takes you through beautiful steep hillside valleys and along ancient tracks, following part of the Trans Pennine Trail to reach nearby Stocksmoor rail station. The return leg can be completed by a simple 2-minute train journey. The walk includes several climbs and descents throughout, including a few steep sections. The paths are a mixture of roadside pavements, woodland paths, field-side paths and ancient tracks. Some of the surfaces can be very slippery when wet, so boots with a good grip are recommended. There are a couple of short sections along country lanes so take care of traffic here. The first two miles (which can be completed as a stand-alone circular walk) includes several stone squeeze gaps (these are quite narrow so could pose a problem for broader people and dogs), kissing gates, two fence stiles and two stone stiles (all these stiles should be easy for most dogs to pass over or alongside). The remainder of the linear route includes further squeeze gaps, kissing gates plus two fence stiles and one stone stile (larger dogs may need a hand over these two fence stiles). Most of the paths are enclosed away from livestock, however you will cross one horse paddock in the first part then, in the second part, another horse paddock, one sheep field and one pasture which sometimes holds cattle. Allow 3 hours. This walk is one of the Penistone Line Collection, published through a collaboration with The Penistone Line Partnership to help visitors discover the beautiful countryside and attractions accessible by train between Huddersfield and Sheffield.Show more
#7 - Salendine Nook to Pole Moor
Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England
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Length: 6.0 mi • Est. 2 h 25 m
There is no mention of Salendine Nook in the 1086 Domesday Book, possibly because Salendine refers to the greater celandine, a member of the poppy family. “Nook” means secluded place or corner. So perhaps Salendine Nook was named after a secluded place where this poppy grew prolifically. The first recorded evidence of a dwelling appears in 1522. In 1558, Edmond de Morton and “a numerous Scotch family”, escaped religious persecution in Scotland to settle in Salendine Nook.Show more
#8 - Wholestone Hill and Huddersfield Narrow Canal
Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England
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Length: 9.4 mi • Est. 4 h 56 m
#9 - Birkby to Fixby Circular
Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England
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Length: 4.6 mi • Est. 2 h 24 m
#10 - Trees In Mind WW1 Trail
Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England
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Length: 9.3 mi • Est. 4 h 44 m
The Trees in Mind Trails ties the WW1 memorial woodland above Marsden to the Colne Valley war memorials and other significant places for the fallen soldiers of the valley. The trail leads you from Milnsbridge up the Colne Valley to the WW1 memorial woodland above Butterley Reservoir in Marsden, which was planted in 2015. The woodland setting itself contains 527 young (Sessile) Oak trees which will mature in time and will be further enhanced with a walkway and seating areas. There is an Oak tree for every person from the Colne Valley who was killed during WW1. The Oaks and their associated 'nurse species' (Alder, Rowan and Scots Pine) are planted in groups that commemorate both the soldiers and the communities they came from. For example, there are 147 Oaks, representing the casualties from Marsden, together with 150 nurse species planted with them. The Trees in Mind project seeks to build a relationship between the memorial woodland and the Colne Valley war memorials and some other significant places of both remembrance and part of the lives of the fallen soldiers in the valley. As part of the trail creation, the trail team ran creative workshops involving the community that resulted in poetry memorial plaques. These poem plaques can be found along the route and you are encouraged to pause and reflect on the words shared. The walk itself will takes in the communities of Milnsbridge, Golcar, Linthwaite, Slaithwaite and Marsden. WW1 research fro the trail came from the hard work of : Milnsbridge: Madeline Andersen-Warren, Golcar: Pauline Ellis, Slaithwaite: Peter Brown, Marsden: Pat Burgess. The Trees In Mind project is possible thanks to National Lottery Heritage Lottery Fund. And the woodland itself has been supported mainly via Colne Valley Tree Society and the Woodland Trust, which provides trees, and grant support from local funders, plus individuals. Show more
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