Best bird watching trails in West Midlands, England

618 Reviews
Explore the most popular bird watching trails in West Midlands with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of bird watching trails in West Midlands, England
Top trails (43)
#1 - The Bulls Head and Earlswood Lakes Walk
Solihull, West Midlands, England
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Length: 4.2 mi • Est. 2 h 4 m
A circular pub walk from The Bulls Head in Earlswood, near Solihull and on the border between the West Midlands and Warwickshire. The Bulls Head is a historic country pub offering locally sourced food and award-winning cask ales from Daniel Thwaites. The walking route explores the fascinating local waterways, including a stretch of the Stratford-upon-Avon Canal and a circuit of Earlswood Lakes, with lots of history and wildlife to discover. The walk is relatively flat with only a couple of gentle slopes. It follows a mixture of canal towpaths, lakeside paths and country lanes. Whilst most of the paths are normally firm, some stretches can have some mud and puddles after periods of rain and the path around Windmill Pool is prone to becoming very muddy in winter and after rain (so you will need good boots at these times). About half of the road stretches have pedestrian pavements but do take care of traffic on those stretches without. There are no stiles on route, but you will need to negotiate several kissing gates and a staggered barrier. You will not be sharing the paths with any livestock, but there are lots of birds and wildfowl on the lakes, so take care with dogs. Allow 2 hours. Show more
#2 - Lickey Hills Circular
Lickey Hills Country Park
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Length: 3.0 mi • Est. 1 h 30 m
A nice circular route around Lickey Hills Park. Look out for coniferous plantations and mixed woodland, with sculptures, playgrounds and plenty of benches allowing you to make the most of this tranquil setting.Show more
#3 - Clent Hill Circular Walk
Halesowen, West Midlands, England
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Length: 2.4 mi • Est. 1 h 14 m
A circular walk around Clent Hills in Worcestershire with spectacular views over Birmingham, Kidderminster and the surrounding area. There are just 2 gates, one kissing gate and no stiles to negotiate, but there is a descent of over 40 steps near the end. There are a few fairly steep hills on route but non of them are too long. Dogs need to be kept on a lead through some areas. Allow 1.5 hours. The car park at Nimmings cafe is owned by the National trust and is pay and display. Also the cafe is cash only.Show more
#4 - Uffmoor Wood
Halesowen, West Midlands, England
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Length: 2.6 mi • Est. 1 h 12 m
A circular walk around Uffmoor Wood in Worcestershire, near Halesowen. There are two kissing gates to negotiate, one at the start and one at finish of the walk. There are no stiles, but a good number of steps up and down. Good boots are recommended as some of the walk may be muddy. You may meet deer and there is plenty of wildlife to enjoy including a variety of birds, moths and butterflies. The walk is particularly good in spring when there are masses of bluebells to be seen. Allow 1.5 hours. Show more
#5 - Forge Mill Circular Trail
Sandwell Valley Country Park
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Length: 2.8 mi • Est. 1 h 24 m
This is a circular walk set in Sandwell Valley. It takes you from the RSPB reserve on the site, past the northern side of Forge Mill lake, through Forge Mill Farm and its associated fields before returning to the RSPB reserve via the southern side of the lake. The walk offers views of the lake, access to Forge Mill Farm, where you can meet the animals, a stroll through a small wood and views of the River Tame. There are a lot of birds on the lake and a variety of animals at the farm. During the summer and autumn, there is sometimes a maize maze at the farm, but you are advised to check before travelling. The walk takes place on shallow gradients with well maintained footpaths for the most part. Some of the paths around the farm/through the woodland take place on grass, and may be muddy after wet weather. There are no stiles or flights of steps on the walk, but there are several gates. Toilets are available at the farm during opening hours.Show more
#6 - Sutton Coldfield Park
Sutton Park
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Length: 3.5 mi • Est. 1 h 39 m
#7 - Leasowes Park and Coombeswood Trail
Leasowes Park
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Length: 2.5 mi • Est. 1 h 12 m
This is a walk around the Coombes Wood area, following the canal, which then heads through Leasowes Wood and around the springs and pools there. The trail commences at the car park in Leasowes Park, heads across Mucklow Hill and along a track that parallels the canal, before heading up the hill to offer some views of the local area. It then descends gently back across Mucklow Hill, before entering Leasowes Wood and following a trail that explores the springs and ponds that have been created there. Allow an hour to an hour and a half for the walk. The Dudley canal was opened in 1779, connecting the Stourbridge and Birmingham canals. Hawne Basin, which can be seen on the other side of the canal was originally an interchange with the Great Western Railway. It is now a marina. Leasowes Park is Grade I listed and covers 58 hectares. A natural spring, passed during the later stages of the walk, runs through iron rich rocks and leaves a striking bright orange deposit behind. William Shenstone took over the site from his father in 1742 and engaged in extensive landscaping, creating the pools that are seen here today. The walk takes place on a variety of surfaces - some of it tarmac, some of it through grassland. Small sections of it are likely to be muddy in wet weather, and some sections are pretty overgrown. There are a few gates and stiles, however these are not always in a good state of repair. A very short section of the walk takes place across the fairway of a golf course, so please take care here. There are information displays, disabled toilets and baby changing facilities at the rangers office. The car park is locked at night.Show more
#8 - Essington Quarry Pool and Black Cat wood
Wolverhampton, West Midlands, England
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Length: 2.0 mi • Est. 56 m
This is a relatively gentle and very popular walk through farmland between Wolverhampton and Essington in South Staffordshire. The walk provides views of Wednesfield, Wolverhampton and the Black Country to the south and the Wrekin and the Clee Hills to the south west. There are no steep parts to the walk, although a fair amount of gentle uphill. Paths are well trodden and it is difficult to get lost. Although the walk is along marked public footpaths there is some livestock in the form of horses and cows so it is advisable to leash dogs. The local farmer through whose land the walk takes you is very friendly as are the local birdwatchers who use the large pool. Half way through the walk is a conveniently situated bench, but there are no toilets or other facilities in the area. The walk is easily achieved in an hour, but there are plenty of other paths that might take your fancy on the route.Show more
#9 - Millennium Way: Heronfield and Temple Balsall
Solihull, West Midlands, England
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Length: 7.1 mi • Est. 3 h 31 m
A circular walk from the small settlement of Heronfield within the Solihull district of the West Midlands. The route explores the surrounding farmland and countryside, including a stretch of the Grand Union Canal and a visit to the hamlet of Temple Balsall. For the first and last part of the walk, you will follow a stretch of the Millennium Way where you will be guided by the distinctive black and white waymarkers. The route is relatively flat, with just gentle gradients. You will need to negotiate several gates, kissing gates, footbridges plus 5 stiles (a couple of which dogs will need a lift over). The farm land is a mixture of crop fields and pastures so you may be sharing the paths with livestock including cattle and horses. Allow 3.5 hours. The Millennium Way is a beautiful 100 mile walk in the heart of England, from Pershore in Worcestershire to Middleton Cheney in Northamptonshire. The route was created by the 41 Club as a community project, with something to offer every walker or rambler across Worcestershire, Warwickshire and Northamptonshire. This is one of 44 circular walks, each of which incorporates a section of the Millennium Way and is published in partnership with 41 Club. Show more
#10 - Wrens Nest Yellow Trail
Wren's Nest National Nature Reserve
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Length: 1.2 mi • Est. 35 m
This is a circular walk around the large limestone outcrop known as the Wrens Nest in Dudley. It starts at the car park on Wrens Hill Road and follows footpaths around the site. The site itself is a former limestone quarry that has since been recovered by nature. The walk offers some excellent views of limestone formations and outcrops and passes through broadleaved woodland. You may also be able to find fossils on the site, which you can take home with you. There are lots of context boards detailing the history of the area, which goes back 420 million years! This walk offers great views of several interesting geological formations on the site and also fantastic views across Dudley and the surrounding areas. There are no stiles on the site but there are quite a few flights of steps, only some of which have handrails and there are a few cut-throughs with a step. Some of the paths are well maintained while others are less so. Some paths will be muddy and have uneven steps. The route is very well signposted throughout - look for the yellow trilobite symbol (it looks a bit like a woodlouse).Show more
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