Best trails in South Yorkshire, England

1,191 Reviews
Trying to find the best South Yorkshire trails? AllTrails has 101 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails around Sheffield, Doncaster or Barnsley, we've got you covered. Just looking to take a quick stroll? We've got 60 easy trails in South Yorkshire ranging from 1.1 to 11.5 miles and from 9 to 1,456 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in South Yorkshire, England
Top trails (101)
#1 - Langsett Reservoir Circular
Peak District National Park
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Length: 3.7 mi • Est. 1 h 58 m
This is a lovely and plant walk around Langsett Reservoir. Langsett Reservoir is near the villages of Langsett and Upper Midhope on the edge of the Peak District National Park. Show more
#2 - Higgor Tor to Stanage Edge
Peak District National Park
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Length: 6.2 mi • Est. 3 h 18 m
A walk along Stanage Edge towards Hathersage and back via Higgor Tor. There are some steep up and downs in certain sections.Show more
#3 - Sprotbrough Falls
Pot Ridings Wood
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Length: 3.5 mi • Est. 1 h 57 m
#4 - Win Hill from Heatherdene
Peak District National Park
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Length: 8.6 mi • Est. 4 h 32 m
At 462m above sea level, the views from Win Hill are tremendous and, given it stands more or less on its own, panoramic. The views start in the north looking over Ladybower Reservoir and up the Upper Derwent Valley to Derwent Edge, Stanage Edge, the Derwent Valley, the Great Ridge and Mam Tor and of course Kinder Scout. There are many walks and well marked paths in the area looked after by Severn Trent Water and the uplands are Open Access land, but this route is one of the longer ones that runs up Win Hill to get the views quickly, then down the far side and around the plantations before dropping down to the track that runs along the bank of Ladybower Reservoir. The views do not stop though as there are once again great views of Derwent Edge from the track alongside the reservoir. This route takes about 4 hours including a stop on the top of Win Hill, essential for refreshments and a gawp at the surrounding views! Much of the area followed by this route is over land managed by Severn Trent Water, whose main priority here is the reservoirs that are used to store drinking water and manage the river flow in the Derwent. Water is also used for drinking water supplies and passes along a 28 mile aqueduct to Ambergate and eventually to Derby and Leicester. The reservoirs here were constructed in two phases, the first from 1901 to 1917 which saw the Howden and Derwent Dams completed. It was here during World War II that the 617 Squadron, led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, practiced their raids that would lead to the destructive raid on the German Ruhr valley dams in May 1943. It is still sometimes possible to see preserved Lancaster bombers flying down the Derwent Valley, quite an awesome sight and sound. The third reservoir, Ladybower, was built from 1935 to 1945. It is the latter that meant that the villages of Derwent and Ashopton were flooded although some of the remains of both can occasionally be seen when the reservoir level is particularly low. The only parts of Ashopton visible on this route are the houses just above the A57; these can be seen from the path alongside the reservoir towards the end of the walk. The dam itself is a puddle-core design meaning it is not a solid masonry built dam but has a clay core surrounding by earth, concrete and stone. It has apparently sufferred more than 1.5m of settlement since it was constructed necessitating raising the level and reinforcement the down slope. There is, I'm happy to hear, a significant margin built in for future settlement! On the slopes of Win Hill there is a significant amount of managed woodland and there is rarely a time when you do not see logging going on at some point along the route. But once above the trees you enter Open Access Land. A marvellous characteristic of Win Hill is that it is largely open all the way round and not part of another ridge. This does open up the views and from the summit the views are truly breathtaking, quite literally on a windy day!Show more
#5 - Abbey Brook Headwaters
Peak District National Park
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Length: 10.6 mi • Est. 5 h 52 m
This walk takes you to a trip to follow the Abbey Brook up into the gorge at stream level, and then head over in the Wet Stones direction. A nice secluded walk with great views and a waterfall. The quickest exit from the gorge is up the slope where the northern rock face ends, watch it if the grass and rock are wet though. Otherwise just backtrack down and up the gentler slopes. Over to High Stones, dropped off the edge to get some views from below for a change, and watch the curlews (note that this route is actually pretty tough on the ankles), back onto the edge and return by Wilfrey Nield, and back down Row Top.Show more
#6 - Sheffield Lodge Moor and Oaking Clough Reservoir
Peak District National Park
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Length: 7.8 mi • Est. 3 h 49 m
An circular walk taking in some rarely-used spots west of Sheffield, accessible by good public transport. There is a small reservoir up on Hallam Moors, and that is the focal point of this walk. It begins with a walk through the woods above Fox Hagg, to descend to Wyming Brook, where it ascends immediately to walk along the edge of Ash Cabin Flat. Descending steeply to follow Wyming Brook Drive for a short while, it climbs west to take in the curious Head Stone before continuing across to ascend Oaking Clough and reach the small, isolated, innominate reservoir: an ideal place for lunch on a fine day. Return is via the well-defined path alongside the conduit, to reach the Redmires Reservoirs. A walk through the waterworks at Redmires Plantation brings us to another conduit which is followed back to Lodge Moor. The walk follows mainly clear paths, with a few sections across well-defined moorland paths. Some sections can get muddy. You will need to negotiate a few stiles and squeeze gaps. The walk crosses a set of stepping stones but these can be avoided if you prefer. You are unlikely to encounter any livestock, although you may come across the odd sheep on the moor so take care with dogs. Show more
#7 - Wyming Brook and Rivelin Reservoir
Peak District National Park
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Length: 3.9 mi • Est. 1 h 34 m
Once exclusively used by the nobility when it was part of the hunting and hawking grounds of Rivelin Chase, Wyming Brook’s streams, crags and sweet smelling pines are now protected as a valuable home to wildlife. Now we can all enjoy this little bit of wilderness on to the West of Sheffield. It is part of the Eastern Moors Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), and there is an abundance of wildlife at this nature reserve, including many kinds of birds, both local and migratory. Wyming Brook has received a prestigious Green Flag Award, an international award scheme which recognises this nature reserve as one of the very best green spaces in the UK.Show more
#8 - Low Bradfield, Agden Reservoir, and Dale Dike Reservoir Circular
Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England
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Length: 6.6 mi • Est. 2 h 39 m
#9 - Thrybergh Reservoir Circular Walk
Thrybergh Country Park
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Length: 1.7 mi • Est. 58 m
£ 1.80 parking feeShow more
#10 - Longshaw Estate Burbage Brook Trail
Peak District National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(21)
Length: 2.1 mi • Est. 1 h 2 m
This family friendly trail is popular with families all year round. At just about two miles and with minimal elevation gain, this is a great trail in nature that is accessible for all. Please note that there are a few rocky and muddy points along the trail. Note that there is a small parking fee in the main lot. At the Longshaw Estate, you will also find a lovely cafe serving food and drinks all year round.Show more
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