Best bird watching trails in Shropshire, England

297 Reviews
Explore the most popular bird watching trails in Shropshire with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of bird watching trails in Shropshire, England
Top trails (37)
#1 - Stiperstones Ridge
Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(46)
Length: 3 mi • Est. 1 h 34 m
A circular walk taking in Stiperstones Ridge in Shropshire, a quartzite ridge formed around 500 million years ago. The walk is a must if you are in the area on a clear day, revealing spectacular geology, impressive panoramic views, wildlife-rich upper heathland and a wealth of myths and legends. The walk up to the ridge is a decent, fairly steep climb and the ridge-top path is awkward terrain being an uneven rocky surface that will test the strength of your ankles. However if you are fit enough, it's worth the effort to get up close to the quartzite tors and for the amazing view. The top of the ridge is very exposed so please do not attempt the walk in fog and make sure you wear appropriate clothing. There are no stiles on route, just a few single gates. Dogs are welcome within the Stiperstones National Nature Reserve but must be kept on leads to protect the ground-nesting birds. The return path crosses two large fields that are likely to be holding cattle, so take care with dogs. (These fields held cows, calves and a bull; the path is well-walked and the cattle seems relaxed with dogs - but do take the usual care). For those who can't manage the climb, there is also an all-ability wide, level and wheelchair-friendly path from the car park which still gives great views - simply follow the AllTrails map in reverse, heading there and back to Waypoint 4. Approximate time 1.5 to 2 hours. Show more
#2 - Church Stratton and Caer Caradoc Circular
Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(10)
Length: 6.6 mi • Est. 3 h 51 m
#3 - Granville Country Park Trail
Telford, Shropshire, England
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(13)
Length: 4 mi • Est. 2 h
A beautiful circular walk discovering the delightful nature and fascinating industrial heritage of Granville Country Park near Telford in Shropshire. This nature reserve is a sprawling network of copses, heaths, grasslands, pools, scrub, wet woodlands and oak capped mounds. Relics of former industrial activity, including furnaces and an old winding house, are now surrounded by woodland full of birds, while pit mounds of waste have been transformed into flower-rich grassland and heath. You will have chance to enjoy plenty of flora and fauna, expansive views and glimpses of old mines and furnaces that helped shape the country's industrial revolution. The walk includes several climbs and descents throughout and you will need to negotiate some kissing gates plus several long steep flights of woodland steps. Many of the woodland paths can get very muddy so good boots are required and wellingtons are recommended after periods of rain and in the wet winter months. A few of the paths are narrow and can get a little overgrown. Dogs are welcome in the country park and the area is a popular dog walking spot. One small section of the park is grazed by horses for conservation at some times of year. There are no toilets or other facilities in the park. Approximate time 2 hours. Show more
#4 - Shropshire's Lake District Circular
Ellesmere, Shropshire, England
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(20)
Length: 7.1 mi • Est. 3 h 20 m
#5 - Wellington and The Wrekin
Wrekin Hill Fort
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(14)
Length: 7.4 mi • Est. 4 h 7 m
A circular walk connecting the historic east Shropshire market town of Wellington to The Wrekin, one of the Midlands most famous natural landmarks. The journey begins in the centre of medieval Wellington and explores The Ercall (the most northerly of the five hills of the Wrekin range) before following the main track to the summit of its iconic 1334-foot sibling. The trail leaves Wellington following the orange-coloured Buzzard signs indicating the new main route of the long-distance Shropshire Way footpath, which continues all the way to the summit of The Wrekin. Returning, the route detours through the town's Bowring Park and historic Market Square before arriving back at the railway station. ACCESS: The trail includes several climbs and descents throughout, most notably around The Ercall and The Wrekin itself and the total ascent is 681 metres. The unmade woodland paths can become seasonally boggy and wet in places. In many areas, walkers also share access with horse riders and cyclists. The trail is free from cattle and livestock, but involves sharing the road with traffic in Ercall Lane, Golf Links Lane and on the Wrekin Course. There is just one stile, at the southern entrance of the footpath around the Ercall Reservoirs. It contains a fence gap suitable for small to medium sized dogs, while larger dogs will need to climb over. There are staggered railings near the end of the footpath connecting Ercall Lane and Hampton Hill, and a small footbridge (suitable for single file passage) just past the entrance to the footpath into Ercall Woods from Golf Links Lane. Allow 4 hours. ADVICE: The heathland atop The Wrekin is a precious landscape that can be easily damaged. Please do not trample on the heather and bilberry and keep dogs on their leads during spring and early summer, when many ground-nesting birds are present. Similarly, the hillfort is a Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM) and visitors are encouraged not to walk on its ramparts. FACILITIES: The walk starts at Wellington rail station, where tourist information and maps of footpaths in the wider area are available. A cafe is situated on Platform Two and public toilets can be accessed with a key during booking office opening hours. Pay toilets are also located at the adjacent bus station, while free facilities can be found at Wellington Civic Centre in Larkin Way. The route also passes the Red Lion pub on Holyhead Road, while Wellington town centre is home to many catering establishments. A new visitor facility at the Halfway House on The Wrekin opened. Its opening hours are variable but can be checked week-to-week online by visiting: www.halfwayhouseonthewrekin.com Show more
#6 - Haughmond Hill Abbey Walk
Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(17)
Length: 3.2 mi • Est. 1 h 34 m
#7 - The Woodbridge Inn and Ironbridge Circular Walk
Telford, Shropshire, England
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(12)
Length: 4.7 mi • Est. 2 h 11 m
A circular pub walk from the Woodbridge Inn in Coalport, Shropshire. The Woodbridge Inn is situated on the banks of the River Severn with a raised outside terrace and a sunny garden room both giving great views across the river. The walking route follows an old railway line through the supposed birthplace of the Industrial Revolution all the way to Ironbridge, crossing the famous Iron Bridge which dates from 1779. The return leg follows the gorge lane back through Coalport and then joins a section of the Silkin Way path for the final stretch. There are opportunities to visit some of the popular visitor attractions within the Ironbridge Gorge, including the Coalport China Museum, the Jackfield Tile Museum and the Iron Bridge Toll House. The walking route is relatively flat, with just a couple of short (but fairly steep) slopes. There are no stiles, just a couple of gates and a short flight of steps. The paths are a mixture of tarmac pavements, quiet lanes and a stone/gravel old railway line. The area is surrounded by woodland so leaf drop can make the paths a little muddy in winter but the mud is never deep. The return leg follows a long stretch of a narrow pavement alongside a fairly busy road. At a couple of points the narrow pavement disappears completely to accommodate properties which sit directly on the road, so take care of traffic here. If you would rather avoid the long stretch of pavement walking, you can simply retrace your steps from the outward leg instead. Approximate time 2 to 2.5 hours, plus extra time to visit any attractions. Show more
#8 - The Boyne Arms and Brown Clee Hill Walk
Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(18)
Length: 5.9 mi • Est. 3 h 10 m
A circular pub walk from the Boyne Arms in Burwarton, Shropshire. The Boyne Arms is a classic country pub and restaurant, the perfect place for refreshments after your walk. The walking route heads up though Burwarton Park and continues up to Abdon Burf, the summit of Brown Clee Hill and the highest point in the Shropshire Hills. The route loops up through the hillside sheep pastures and open moorland with pretty lakes and streams to enjoy and magnificent views across the surrounding area. The return leg follows the permissive tracks through the Burwarton Estate with pretty sections of woodland awash with bluebells in the spring. The walk follows paths across hillside pastures and moorland which can be fairly rough and muddy so good boots are a must. The first half of the walk climbs first steadily and then more steeply up into the hills (a rise of about 280m) with the return leg following the equivalent descent. The summit of Brown Clee Hill is very exposed and weather conditions can change quickly so ensure you are well prepared with appropriate warm clothing. There are several gates along the way plus a few stiles (two of these have wire mesh surrounds so dogs may need a lift over). Most of the way round you will be sharing the paths with sheep and two fields (at the start and then at the end) are likely to be holding cattle, so take care with dogs. Approximate time 3 to 4 hours. Show more
#9 - Wrekin Hill Fort Circular Walk
Wrekin Hill Fort
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(7)
Length: 3.8 mi • Est. 2 h 15 m
#10 - Long Mynd Circular via Bridges
Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(7)
Length: 8.7 mi • Est. 4 h 31 m
Showing results 1 - 10 of 37