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Best trails in Skipton

371 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Skipton, North Yorkshire? AllTrails has 34 great hiking trails, trail running trails, views trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Yorkshire Dales National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Clifton County Park or Ogden Water Country Park. Ready for some activity? There are 25 moderate trails in Skipton ranging from 1.8 to 21.2 miles and from 269 to 2,335 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Skipton
Top trails (34)
#1 - Malham Tarn via Gordale Scar
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 7.6 mi • Est. 3 h 59 m
A circular and very challenging walk, passing through some wonderful limestone scenery as it visits the iconic Yorkshire Dales sites of Janet's Foss, Gordale Scar, Malham Tarn and Malham Cove. With beautiful waterfalls, a lake, a limestone pavement and an impressive natural cove you will be spoiled with natural delights along the way. The walk follows a mixture of roads and dale footpaths. There are several climbs and descents throughout. You will need to negotiate flights of steps, kissing gates, gates and a few stiles (of various designs, including stone wall stiles and ladder stiles). The challenging part of the walk is a scramble up Gordale Scar - a rocky climb which is suitable only for experienced walkers and should NOT be attempted after periods of heavy rain (when the waterfall can be flowing strongly) or in icy conditions. You will be sharing much of the open moorland with free roaming sheep. Allow 4 hours.Show more
#2 - Grassington Circular
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 7.8 mi • Est. 3 h 53 m
A beautiful river walk at the beginning and a picturesque gorge at the half way point, before a stroll back through the fields and woods.Show more
#3 - Simons Seat
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 9.3 mi • Est. 4 h 58 m
Bolton abbey, Valley of Desolation, Simons Seat, Barden BridgeShow more
#4 - Bolton Abbey to Barden Bridge Circular Walk
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 7.1 mi • Est. 3 h 28 m
The Bolton Abbey is right in the heart of Yorkshire Dales National Park. Enjoy the woods, river, and other beautiful views. Show more
#5 - Rylstone Cross and Cracoe Obelisk
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 7 mi • Est. 3 h 44 m
Rylstone is a tiny village alongside the busy A6265 Skipton to Grassington road with an attractive pond which used to be the village green. Wordsworth in his 'White Doe of Rylstone' tells the unfortunate story of the Norton family who took part in the Rising of the North. Rylstone Cross stands in a prominent position on Rylstone Fell. Originally it was a large stone in the form of a man and was known as the 'The Stone Man'. In 1885 a wooden cross was erected to commemorate 'The Peace of Paris'. The wooden structure having been replaced several times is now made of reinforced concrete with a plaque dated 1995 for its reconstruction. There follows easy walking alongside the stone wall to the Cracoe Obelisk. A metal plate commemorates the local dead of both world wars, but the initials of those killed in the 1914-18 war are also carved into the stones of the monument. It is a great place for views into wonderful Wharfedale with Buckden Pike and Great Whernside clearly seen. It is an easy descent towards Cracoe but it is extremely wet on the approach to the wooden sheep folds at the bottom of the slope. Chapel Lane, now grassy, leading back to Rylstone was once an important road linking Craven with the North and Scotland. The ponds on reaching the farm were once fish ponds and the area was associated with Quakerism. A building known as 'Fox How Barn' was built in 1657 as a meeting house and named after George Fox. PS. Rylstone was the place where the original Calendar Girls were based.   Show more
#6 - Upper Wharfedale: Buckden and Yockenthwaite
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 7.5 mi • Est. 4 h 14 m
Walking in the Upper Wharfedale, you will find limestone uplands, beautiful valleys and picturesque waterfalls. It is a charming little valley that is difficult to get to in a large vehicle. You will see the villages of Cray, Yokenthwaite, and Hubberholme full of valleys and a series of waterfalls. The walk starts at the National Trust car park off the B6160. The path will offer excellent views of the surrounding valleys. Follow the signs and stay left along Buckden Rake towards Cray. Once in Cray, locate the footpath posted for Stubbings Bridge and Yockenthwaite behind the White Lion pub. You will reach the Scar House and veer left to a remote valley and ruined barn. Still going towards Yockenthwaite, stay on the north bank of the river and follow Dalesway to Hubberholme. Then you will cross the bridge and take the path back to Buckden.Show more
#7 - The Dales Day 2
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 15.1 mi • Est. 7 h 20 m
#8 - Buckden Pike and Lead Mine
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 7.8 mi • Est. 4 h 35 m
Buckden Peak is one of the highest peaks in the Yorkshire Dales. Advance Warning: there are two or three sections of the ascent which would come under the classification of a Grade 1 scramble. If you're uncomfortable with using your hands then this walk isn't for you. Leave the car park at Buckden, head past the toilets and make a right up the the lane. Turn left again and head up the narrow track and through the metal gate at the end. Now make a final left and head up the valley past the Yorkshire Water plant. You've found the back route up Buckden Pike.  Follow the path as it winds its way up the valley to the first large waterfall. Here the path seemingly disappears, but climb up the steep bank to the rock-face on your left and you'll find a break in the rock where you can clamber up to the next level. Now its case of rinse and repeat for each of the larger waterfalls; bear left and climb up, over, and through the rocks. After about a mile you'll come to what appears to be an orange scree slope, it's actually the spoil heap from the old Buckden Lead Mine, but clamber up the left-hand side of it and you'll find the entrance to the mine. Here's an ideal place for a quick break and bite to eat before heading into the unrelenting winds further up. From here take the path to the left of the mineshaft and follow the clearly defined path up the hillside. After half a mile you come to a junction, take the ladder stile to the left to reach the summit proper of Buckden Pike, or turn right to head for the War Memorial. From the War Memorial the path heads southeast down through the bog to a gate in the end of the wall where it picks up the path from Walden Head. Head through the gate and down Starbotton Fell, passing through a second gateway after which you'll find Cam Gill Beck on your left. You're now on the old Walden Road down into Starbotton with the beautifully named Knuckle Bone pasture to one side and a series of shake holes to the other. Arriving at the end of the road and the houses at the bottom continue until you meet the paved road and then carry on until you meet a T junction. Take the right-hand 'T' between the houses and turn left at the main road. After 70 metres cross over and take the pathway between the fields to the river. On reaching the River Wharfe head straight over the footbridge and make an immediate right turn into the fields. Now follow the way-marked path through the fields back to Buckden. Arriving in Buckden the path deposits you next to the hump-back bridge on the B6160, turn right and head over the bridge before taking a left over the village green back to the car park. Show more
#9 - Grassington and North Yorkshire
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 7.3 mi • Est. 3 h 21 m
A circular walk from the village of Grassington in the heart of the Yorkshire Dales, North Yorkshire. If you're after a fairly level Dales walk by a river, through fields and meadows, with beautiful views and also the opportunity to stop off at dog-friendly places then this could be the walk for you. The terrain is medium difficulty, mostly grassy paths and lanes with gentle to moderate gradients. Some sections of the route can be very muddy after periods of rain and in winter. You will be crossing many grass pastures that are likely to contain a mixture of sheep and cattle. There is a small amount of road walking in Hebden. You will need to negotiate some steps and gates and there are several stiles along the route in the form of gaps within the dry-stone wall. Most of these should be suitable for agile dogs to negotiate, but there are a couple where dogs may need a hand. There are public toilets in the car park at the start of the walk. Allow 2.5 hours. Show more
#10 - Skipton Castle Woods Trail
Skipton, North Yorkshire, England
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Length: 2 mi • Est. 57 m
A pretty woodland walk from the small market town of Skipton in North Yorkshire. The route follows the canal out of the town to reach Skipton Castle Woods, once used to provide timber, fuel and food for the castle, while its waterways powered local wool and saw mills, as well as being a source of fish. The route follows a mix of wide stone tracks, tarmac paths and unmade woodland paths, the latter of which can get very muddy. A couple of sections lead you up the steep valley sides and you will need to negotiate steep flights of steps in these parts, plus a few gates elsewhere on the route. One of the valley top paths has a steep drop to the side so please take care here. Dogs are welcome in the woodland. There are toilets and plenty of options for refreshments in the centre of Skipton, where the walk begins. Approximate time 1 hour. Show more
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