Best mountain biking trails in Lancashire, England

183 Reviews
Explore the most popular mountain biking trails in Lancashire with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of mountain biking trails in Lancashire, England
Top trails (13)
#1 - Fair Snape Fell and Parlick
Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Length: 5.9 mi • Est. 3 h 19 m
A moderately strenuous circular walk near Chipping starting with Saddle Fell then Wolf Fell before taking in the twin summits of Fair Shape fell, before finishing with Patrick. This way round finishes with a steep descent overlooking the gliding club. The Forest of Bowland is a 'Forest' because it was once a Royal Hunting Forest and not because of any trees. It is a wide open area of grouse moors and until recently the preserve of game-keepers. Access rights have made this area a lot more popular. The route is easy taking in Saddle Fell, Wolf Fell, Fair Snape Fell and Parlick which under the right conditions is a hang gliders mecca. It is also a very good introduction for those who are who not familiar with the Bowland area. Much has been achieved to encourage a sustainable management of the area by improving heather cover, protect bird populations repair walls and enhance the landscape. The word snape means pasture, thus Fair Snape Fell means "fell of the fair (beautiful) pasture".Show more
#2 - Ormskirk and around Burscough Priory
Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
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Length: 5.6 mi • Est. 2 h 15 m
This is a walk that links Burscough Priory with Lathom Chapel. Burscough Priory was founded in 1189; when dissolved in 1536 there were just four monks and a Prior here. Lathom Park Chapel was built in 1500 and dedicated to St John the Divine. Adjacent are 'Alms Houses'. This is a conservation area. Near the entrance is 'Cromwell's Stone' -  the hollows in the stone were used for casting 'shot' used by his army in the siege of Lathom House 1644-1645.Show more
#3 - Gisburn Forest Circular
Gisburn Forest
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Length: 10.2 mi
Note: this is a popular mountain biking area.Show more
#4 - Hurstwood Reservoir
Burnley, Lancashire, England
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Length: 5.4 mi • Est. 2 h 11 m
#5 - Lee Quarry
Bacup, Lancashire, England
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Length: 2.4 mi
#6 - Fulwood Circular
Preston, Lancashire, England
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Length: 8.5 mi • Est. 3 h 26 m
#7 - Rossendale Valley: Waterfoot and Edenfield
Rossendale, Lancashire, England
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Length: 9.8 mi • Est. 3 h 56 m
#8 - Glasson Dock, Aldcliffe and Lancaster Canal
Lancaster, Lancashire, England
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Length: 9.4 mi • Est. 4 h 20 m
The best starting point is at the Condor Green picnic spot where there are toilets and the 'Cafe 'd Lune' for refreshments. The old railway line from Glasson Dock into the centre of Lancaster is part of the linear 'River Lune Millennium Park' and is used by walkers, cyclists and horse riders. When Lancaster docks became increasingly silted-up a railway was constructed in 1883 to use Glasson as the port for Lancaster. The last passenger service was withdrawn in 1933 and the railway closed in 1964. The line passes Ashton Hall, now Lancaster Golf Club, which was the home of Sir James Williamson the Lancaster linolium magnate. After leaving the line and passing through the village of Aldcliffe the Lancaster Canal is followed south to Galgate. The towpath is initially tarmac but disintegrates into a wet grassy track which passes through a 2 mile long cutting to avoid the construction of locks. The bridges are fine elliptical arches designed by John Rennie. From the canal to Condor Green the going over pasture land, is in winter, of the usual sticky mud variety. Glasson Dock in its earliest days in the 1780's attracted trade from as far afield as the West Indies and The Baltic.Show more
#9 - Ribble Circular
Blackburn--1, Lancashire, England
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Length: 17.1 mi • Est. 7 h 52 m
A lovely walk starting in Langho and going up the hill to Dean Clough Reservoir to start, then traversing along the hill through the fields to Whalley, all the while taking in the fantastic views out over the valleys. Then climbing up out of Whalley, climbing over the farmland hills before descending down to Wiswell & Barrow to head towards the Ribble. Then looping back along the rivers towards Whalley before heading back to the start at Old LanghoShow more
#10 - Clougha Pike, Grit Fell, Ward's Stone Circular
Lancaster, Lancashire, England
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Length: 10.8 mi • Est. 5 h 21 m
This 17.4km trail starts from Clougha Pike and it takes you through Grit Fell and Ward's Stone. This place is magical with incredible views and scenery from all directions. A perfect nature trip day out, ideal for running, walking, mountain biking. It's a moderate/ hard climb to get there and it can be muddy and boggy at times so it's recommended to take some walking boots and appropriate clothing. Dogs are allowed on the public footpath which goes up to the Pike but they are not allowed anywhere else because of the terms of the Access Agreement over the rest of the land. You can take your dog straight up to the Pike and then straight back to the car park. Show more
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