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Best trails in Carnforth

112 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Carnforth, Lancashire? AllTrails has 16 great hiking trails, views trails, walking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Yorkshire Dales National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Gisburn Forest or Brockholes Nature Reserve. Ready for some activity? There are 9 moderate trails in Carnforth ranging from 3.8 to 18.1 miles and from 59 to 2,296 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Carnforth
Top trails (16)
#1 - Arnside Knott
Arnside and Silverdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Length: 5.2 mi • Est. 2 h 36 m
The incoming tide over Morcambe Bay is squeezed as it enters the Kent Estuary at Arnside and a wall, or 'bore' of fast moving water is created. On account of the high tides a layer of thin mud had been left on the foreshore towards New Barns. Instead of heading around to Blackstone Point the shorter route through the caravan park can be taken. White Creek is where Cedric Robinson leads his Morcambe Bay walking groups out across the sands towards Kents Bank at Grange. From White Creek a pleasant cliff top path winds its way to another caravan site at Far Arnside. There are plenty of picnic opportunities along here. After passing the cottages a path to the left leads to Arnside Knott clearly seen ahead. Be sure to locate the viewing indicator beyond a wall on the left for the best views from here. Proceeding towards the trig point, after awhile on the left is the now dead remains of  the 'knotted tree' of Arnside Knott.  Following north from the trig point the views open-up again as a descent is made over a grassy area towards the start at Arnside.Show more
#2 - Whernside and Ingleborough Circular Walk
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 13.8 mi • Est. 7 h 34 m
#3 - Silverdale Shore and Eaves Wood
Carnforth, Lancashire, England
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Length: 5.9 mi • Est. 2 h 44 m
Silverdale used to be a popular bathing resort in the 1840's (and could still be with today's weather), but the growth of the salt-marsh saw its end. A walk along the base of the cliffs used to be on turf but due to erosion is not as easy. The cliff at Jack Scout Cove ( Cows Mouth) is the only sea rock climbing area in Lancashire. The headland at Jack Scout belongs to the National Trust and is one of the best places in the area - a lunch spot perhaps ! The jetty at Jenny Brown's Point was built so ships could help with the construction of the smelt mill. Copper ore was mined close by. Jenny Brown was a nanny who was drowned whilst saving her charges from the rising tide in the 18th century. The Eaves Wood paths have all the attractions of a maze and you need a sense of adventure to explore them, as well as a sense of direction (or your GPS). The woodland walking is a nice contrast to that of the open bay, the woods being coppiced up to the start of WW 1. At 'The Cove' is a cave in the cliffs, it was worn by water when levels used to be higher.Show more
#4 - Farleton Knott
Carnforth, Lancashire, England
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Length: 3.8 mi • Est. 2 h 4 m
#5 - Ribble Head Circular
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 5.1 mi • Est. 2 h 25 m
This is an easy 5 mile circular walk from the car park at Ribble Head.Show more
#6 - Over Kellet and Yealand Conyers
Carnforth, Lancashire, England
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Length: 11.7 mi • Est. 5 h 27 m
Pleasant walking over pastureland with good views and plenty of historical interest. Borwick Hall is an Elizabethan House now a conference center with Lancashire CC. The future Charles II stayed at Borwick. Tewitfield is the northern terminus of the Lancaster Canal which was cut off here when the M6 was built. Yealand Conyers is pronounced 'Yelland Conyers' and has many fine properties. The Quaker Meeting House was built in 1697. This is an interesting area often overlooked, and all the more appealing for it.Show more
#7 - Dales Way Day 4
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 18.1 mi • Est. 8 h 20 m
#8 - Arnside Knot Short Loop
Carnforth, Lancashire, England
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Length: 2.7 mi • Est. 1 h 25 m
#9 - Crag Hill, Great Coum and Gragareth Circular
Carnforth, Lancashire, England
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Length: 10 mi • Est. 5 h 21 m
Crag Hill at 2,237 ft. offers extensive views of the Howgill Fells beyond Sedbergh. Great Coum is the highest point on the ridge - below is the full length of Dentdale. Lancashire points a long finger into the adjoining counties of Cumbria and Yorkshire along the line of Ease Gill all meeting at Green Hill at the so-called 'County Stone'. Gragareth has extensive views of Ingleborough, Morcambe Bay and the Lakes Fells. The 'Three Men of Gragareth' have been a noticeable landmark for many generations overlooking the valley. Theses are rugged cairns built by lovers of mountains and as such have an individual character. Leck Fell House Farm is the last dwelling in Lancashire and must be the loneliest. At the lower section of Ease Gill is the spectacular  'Ease Gill Kirk' - a deep gorge with vertical wooded cliffs with many caves and pools. There are also fantastically shaped limestone features worn by flood waters. Beyond here the subterrainian waters reappear to become 'Leck Beck'.Show more
#10 - Burton and Hutton Roof Crags
Carnforth, Lancashire, England
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Length: 10.9 mi • Est. 5 h 38 m
It is a varied walk that takes in the towpath of the now defunct part of the Lancaster Canal(but in noway detracts from its appeal) and the rugged limestone of Hutton Roof Crags. Burton is an attractive village with a long history, a charter for a market was granted by Charles II in 1661. The Lancaster to Kendal turnpike passed through the village. On the canal, boats carried coal northwards and limestone southwards: so the canal was nicknamed 'The Black and White Canal'. Hutton Roof Crags deserve more than a fleeting visit.There are so many variations in this compact area that many visits would be needed to get to know it.Show more
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