Best trails in Burnley, Lancashire

314 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Burnley, Lancashire? AllTrails has 16 great hiking trails, trail running trails, walking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Yorkshire Dales National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Kinder Scout National Nature Reserve or Broadoak Park. Ready for some activity? There are 13 moderate trails in Burnley ranging from 3 to 11.6 miles and from 308 to 1,824 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
Show more
Map of trails in Burnley, Lancashire
Top trails (16)
#1 - Pendle Hill and Ogden Reservoir
Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(125)
Length: 4.9 mi • Est. 2 h 47 m
This is a no-nonsense well walked way to the top of Pendle Hill starting from the village of Barley. There is ample parking for just £1 - a bargain - no need to park on the road, as well as toilets and a cafe. After leaving the village the paths are very well signed and are part of the 'Pendle Way' a 45-mile circular walk around the borough of Pendle encompassing Nelson and Colne. The route climbs 'Big End', so called on account of the steep escarpment edge at this eastern end. From the summit cairn the ground slopes gently to the west with various 'clough's' cutting into the hillsides. As the route crosses 'Boar Clough' there is shelter, or rest awhile at the bottom where 'Boar Clough' joins with 'Ogden Clough'. The reservoirs of Upper and Lower Ogden supply the people of Nelson. Stop and admire the impressive handiwork of the stonemasons art in constructing the walls, spillways and by-washes. It is a pleasant stroll down the valley back to Barley. Many signs depicting the Pendle Witches will be seen. 'Demdike' and her family are central figures in the 1612 witchcraft panic and trial - but that's another story !!Show more
#2 - Pendle Hill Long Loop
Burnley, Lancashire, England
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(42)
Length: 7.0 mi • Est. 3 h 47 m
#3 - Singing Ringing Tree Circular
Burnley, Lancashire, England
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(36)
Length: 6.1 mi • Est. 3 h 12 m
Another walk as part of the excellent 'South Pennines Walking Festival' described as follows - Guided walk from historic Towneley Hall through Forest of Burnley woodlands and South Pennine moorland to the iconic Singing Ringing Tree. The hall is Burnley's art gallery and museum being acquired in 1901, together with land, from the Towneley family who had owned it for 500 years. Behind the hall is 'Boggart Bridge'. A Boggart is a malevolent spirit legendary throughout the Pennines. The one here is reputed to be the spirit of a landlord notorious for collecting stiff rents from tenants,. The route follows the Burnley Way up from Towneley to Crown Point with oak marker posts topped with carved animals (12 in total), by Martyn Bendnarczuk. Also was a replica brick kiln by Julie Miles all part of Pennine Arts. The Singing Ringing Tree is situated on a prominence above Burnley called Crown Point and is a collection of steel pipes stacked one on top of the other and designed to look like a wind blown tree. The wind blowing through the pipes creates a sound that is said to be simultaneously discordant and melancholy. It was completed in 2006 as part of an arts and regeneration project across east Lancashire and Yorkshire. There are 5 such 'panoticans' ie structures providing a comprehensive view, or if you prefer '21st-century landmarks'.Show more
#4 - Hurstwood Reservoir
Burnley, Lancashire, England
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(12)
Length: 5.4 mi • Est. 2 h 11 m
#5 - Big End, Pendle Hill and Ogden Reservouir
Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(17)
Length: 7.1 mi • Est. 3 h 43 m
#6 - Clowbridge Reservoir Walk
Burnley, Lancashire, England
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(31)
Length: 6.2 mi • Est. 3 h 9 m
Clowbridge Reservoir is adjacent to the Burnley Millennium Forest known as the Dunnockshaw Community Woodland. The reservoir is home to the Rossendale Valley Sailing Club - dinghy sailing, windsurfing. United Utilities and Lancashire CC have invested in the area to provide access to the numerous bridleways and footpaths that criss-cross the moors. On Gambleside Moor are a number of ancient crosses erected in the 13th century marking ancient tracks which were later used as packhorse routes. The ancient settlement of Gambleside was inhabited for over 600yrs by farmers and coalminers. In the 1860's the Clowbridge Reservoir was built and the hamlet abandoned. Religion played an important part in local life and an open air Baptistry was constructed in 1839 and still can be seen(in the photos). The moorlands are being returned to wetland habitats (having been drained), to reduce erosion and thereby CO2 emmision and to encourage birdlife for -short-eared owls, merlin, lapwing, snipe, curlew and many more. Show more
#7 - Thieveley Pike and Cliviger Gorge
Burnley, Lancashire, England
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(14)
Length: 6.1 mi • Est. 3 h 25 m
The walk is an up and down one but none the worse for this. The initial climb from the fish ponds through the new plantings is steep and the views from the moor tops on clear days is extensive. You may not agree with wind farms but the one at Coal Clough seems to be as concealed as much as these things can be. There are 24 turbines. As part of a millennium project a lot of trees have been planted to re-establish what was once known as the Forest of Burnley' The hidden valley below Dean Scout was the site of an annual Goodfriday fair in years gone by. The area had a vibrant coal mining industry and in 1627 lead was discovered at Dean Scout. The river is the Calder - northwards the Lancashire version - southwards the Yorkshire version.Show more
#8 - Towneley Park and Cliviger Mill Circular Walk
Burnley, Lancashire, England
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(6)
Length: 3.0 mi • Est. 1 h 29 m
A circular walk through Towneley Park near Burnley, Lancashire. Towneley Park surrounds the beautiful Towneley Hall. Home of the Towneley family for almost 500 years, the hall was sold to Burnley Corporation in 1901 when the male line of the family came to an end. Situated in 400 acres of beautiful parkland, Burnley Council has developed the building into an art gallery and museum, with fine period rooms decorated with oil paintings and sculptures. Towneley Hall has been called the Jewel in Burnley's Crown but that understates its significance - certainly it is one of Lancashire's most important buildings and by any measure should be high on the list of national treasures. The grounds are a great place to walk at any time of year. The parkland is open all year (normally until dusk) but the museum has seasonal opening so check before you travel if you are hoping to visit the exhibitions. The walk includes several gentle gradients and follows a mixture of parkland paths and avenues plus paths crossing grass pastures. You will need to negotiate gates, kissing gates, bridges and two stiles. Dogs are welcome on this walking route (it does not enter areas of the park where dogs are prohibited) but please follow local signage to ensure they are on leads in the areas required. You may come across livestock in a couple of the pastures. Allow 2 hours. Show more
#9 - Pendle Hill: Barley to Downham
Burnley, Lancashire, England
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(4)
Length: 4.5 mi • Est. 2 h 38 m
A nice half day hike with lots of history.Show more
#10 - Hapton to Burnley
Burnley, Lancashire, England
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(4)
Length: 8.0 mi • Est. 4 h 5 m
The Burnley Way is a long distance trail of 40 miles. There are six leaflets that can be downloaded with all the info you require. This walk roughly covers leaflet 5 but done in the opposite direction. The Forest of Burnley was created between 1997 and 2003 when 1 million trees were planted. This has meant that it has brought Burnley's woodland cover from one of the lowest at 3% to England's average woodland cover of 8%. The Forest of Burnley was a 'Big Society' project before the term hit the political headlines. The start is Hapton Station and the finish is Manchester Road Station. At Hapton you can see three different forms of transport from thee different ages - the Leeds Liverpool Canal 1816, the railway 1848 and M65 1983. Castle Clough Wood derives its name from Hapton Castle which stood on the side of the gorge which was created by glacial meltwater. The track alongside Thorny Bank Clough onto the moor top was the firmest, albeit with an accompanied stream.Show more
Showing results 1 - 10 of 16