Best bird watching trails in Lancashire, England

1,400 Reviews
Explore the most popular bird watching trails in Lancashire with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of bird watching trails in Lancashire, England
Top trails (93)
#1 - White Coppice, Great Hill, and Anglezarke Circular
Chorley, Lancashire, England
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Length: 9.2 mi • Est. 4 h 40 m
This area is littered with reservoirs that were built at the turn of the 19th century to supply water to the nearby cotton towns and mills. If you want to show someone how picturesque Lancashire can be (on a sunny day) take them to White Coppice which was once a busy industrial village with a population of some 200. Today many people will view White Coppice as an idyllic place to live. Beyond the cricket ground nestling at the foot of the moors is Dean Black Brook an area of quarrying and lead ore extraction. Drinkwater's is an abandoned farmstead with it's own well known as Joe's Cup! On the moor, but not visited on this route, is an ancient burial mound called Round Loaf. Lead Mines Clough has been mined from around 1690 up to 1930.Show more
#2 - Entwistle and Wayoh Reservoirs
Darwen, Lancashire, England
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Length: 4.4 mi • Est. 2 h 9 m
A circular walk near Darwen in Lancashire, taking in the beautiful moorland and woodland areas that sit between the two reservoirs, Wayoh Reservoir and Turton and Entwistle Reservoir. The walk begins by climbing into the moorland where you will have fabulous views, before descending through Chapeltown to reach the banks of Wayoh Reservoir. The pretty waterside paths are lined with dense woodland, the water is home to plenty of wildlife and you will get a great view of the Armsgrove Viaduct. The final stretch takes you through the village of Entwistle to return to the banks of Turton and Entwistle Reservoir. The walk has several climbs and descents throughout. Some sections of the paths can be very muddy at times. You will need to negotiate several gates, kissing gates and flights of steps but there are no stiles on route. Most of the paths are enclosed but you will need to cross three sheep pastures plus one large hillside field which may be holding cattle, so take care with dogs. (The cattle can be present when you walk but they may or may not ignore you). Allow 2.5 hours.Show more
#3 - Scorton and Grizedale Reservoir
Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Length: 3.9 mi • Est. 2 h 4 m
#4 - Arnside Knott
Arnside and Silverdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Length: 5.2 mi • Est. 2 h 36 m
The incoming tide over Morcambe Bay is squeezed as it enters the Kent Estuary at Arnside and a wall, or 'bore' of fast moving water is created. On account of the high tides a layer of thin mud had been left on the foreshore towards New Barns. Instead of heading around to Blackstone Point the shorter route through the caravan park can be taken. White Creek is where Cedric Robinson leads his Morcambe Bay walking groups out across the sands towards Kents Bank at Grange. From White Creek a pleasant cliff top path winds its way to another caravan site at Far Arnside. There are plenty of picnic opportunities along here. After passing the cottages a path to the left leads to Arnside Knott clearly seen ahead. Be sure to locate the viewing indicator beyond a wall on the left for the best views from here. Proceeding towards the trig point, after awhile on the left is the now dead remains of  the 'knotted tree' of Arnside Knott.  Following north from the trig point the views open-up again as a descent is made over a grassy area towards the start at Arnside.Show more
#5 - Winter Hill and Rivington Pike
Chorley, Lancashire, England
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Length: 5.4 mi • Est. 3 h 3 m
A good circular walk from Rivington Barn up to the Dove Cote, then on to the transmitters at Winter Hill, returning via Rivington Pike and the GardensShow more
#6 - Fair Snape Fell and Parlick
Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Length: 5.9 mi • Est. 3 h 19 m
A moderately strenuous circular walk near Chipping starting with Saddle Fell then Wolf Fell before taking in the twin summits of Fair Shape fell, before finishing with Patrick. This way round finishes with a steep descent overlooking the gliding club. The Forest of Bowland is a 'Forest' because it was once a Royal Hunting Forest and not because of any trees. It is a wide open area of grouse moors and until recently the preserve of game-keepers. Access rights have made this area a lot more popular. The route is easy taking in Saddle Fell, Wolf Fell, Fair Snape Fell and Parlick which under the right conditions is a hang gliders mecca. It is also a very good introduction for those who are who not familiar with the Bowland area. Much has been achieved to encourage a sustainable management of the area by improving heather cover, protect bird populations repair walls and enhance the landscape. The word snape means pasture, thus Fair Snape Fell means "fell of the fair (beautiful) pasture".Show more
#7 - Whernside and Ingleborough Circular Walk
Yorkshire Dales National Park
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Length: 13.8 mi • Est. 7 h 34 m
Sections of this trail have been reported closed for maintenance (December 2020). Show more
#8 - Haslingden Grane and Hog Low Pike Circular
Rossendale, Lancashire, England
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Length: 6.4 mi • Est. 3 h 16 m
This is an area of attractive moorland and valley landscapes with a long history of man's many activities. Apart from the obvious man made reservoirs of Calf Hey, Ogden and Holden Wood, there are the ruins of long abandoned farms where up to 1,000 people lived and worked when weaving was a cottage industry. The illicit distilling of whiskey provided a welcome supplement to the income from farm and loom. This is a walk of two halves - the valley of Haslingden Grain, and the moorland above Musbury Heights.Show more
#9 - Stocks Reservoir
Gisburn Forest
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Length: 7.5 mi • Est. 3 h 41 m
The Stocks Reservoir was opened in 1923 to supply water to the Fylde Coast. It was built by the 'Fylde Water Board' (FWB) and they held their board meetings in the fine building overlooking the dam (The Board House). The reservoir is now part of United Utilities and the Stocks Board House is their Bowland Estate Office. The village of 'Stocks' was lost to the reservoir which consisted of three cottages, a post office, a smithy and an Inn, and served the wider community of Dale Head. The church, vicarage and school (40 pupils on closure), stood a little apart from the village centre. It took 22yrs from planning stage to the flooding of the valley in 1932. Many of the farms around the dale head were unsustainable and were demolished. The church was the only one to be rebuilt, and in 1938 moved on to its present site. On visiting, it was open to view, and you are invited to - 'Pause and Rest Awhile'. A railway line was constructed to bring down stone from near Cross of Greet Bridge and is used on the walk on the eastern side of the reservoir. There are two 'bird hides' near the start at the School Lane car park and also picnic site facilities. The reservoir is used by anglers who can hire boats. The 'Stocks Cafe' is for both anglers and walkers!! Also to be found on the walk is 'The Bowland Memorial Forest'. It is part of the 'Life for a Life' scheme which involves the planting of a tree to commemorate a loved one. Indeed there are memorial plaques all around the route dedicated to people who have contributed to the area. Besides the 'Stocks Reservoir Circular Walk' there are many more in the adjacent Gibson Forest which is leased to the Forestry Commission. Some are used by mountain bikers whose longest trail is the12 miles - Red Route - scale severe !! The start for these routes is from the Crocket Hill car park.Show more
#10 - Ormskirk and around Burscough Priory
Ormskirk, Lancashire, England
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Length: 5.8 mi • Est. 2 h 45 m
This is a walk that links Burscough Priory with Lathom Chapel. Burscough Priory was founded in 1189; when dissolved in 1536 there were just four monks and a Prior here. Lathom Park Chapel was built in 1500 and dedicated to St John the Divine. Adjacent are 'Alms Houses'. This is a conservation area. Near the entrance is 'Cromwell's Stone' -  the hollows in the stone were used for casting 'shot' used by his army in the siege of Lathom House 1644-1645.Show more
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