Best trails in Manchester, Greater Manchester

519 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Manchester, Greater Manchester? AllTrails has 63 great trail running trails, hiking trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Peak District National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Dovedale National Nature Reserve or Kinder Scout National Nature Reserve. Just looking to take a quick stroll? We've got 48 easy trails in Manchester ranging from 0.6 to 11.8 miles and from 49 to 511 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Manchester, Greater Manchester
Top trails (63)
#1 - Clifton Country Park, Waterdale and Moses Gate Country Park
Clifton County Park
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Length: 19 mi • Est. 8 h 39 m
Enjoy a nature trip near Manchester on this 30km circular trail, starting from Clifton, going through Drinkwater park, Waterdale, Philips Park, Outwood Country Park, Ladyshore and Moses Gate Country Park. Explore the woods, beautiful lakes, river, the sound of the birds and just a peaceful time away from the big city. Wide open spaces ideal for dog walks, picnic and time to have fun with friends and family. Show more
#2 - Roe Green Loop Line and Bridgewater Canal
Broadoak Park
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Length: 3.7 mi • Est. 1 h 39 m
This canal used to be used to transport coal. It is now a great walk in beautiful Broadoak Park.Show more
#3 - Chinatown, West Disbury and Chorlton Cum Hardy
Manchester, Greater Manchester, England
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Length: 9.3 mi • Est. 3 h 44 m
Explore and visit Manchester city centre on this 15km trail, starting from Chinatown, going through West Disbury and Chorlton Cum Hardy. On your way, make sure to visit the main highlights of the city and enjoy everything the town has to offer. Visit its churches, theatres, stop by the Rochdale canal and appreciate the stunning view, grab something to eat at one of the local restaurants/pubs and take a break and relax at Alexandra Park. Great for bike rides, walk, run and the perfect spot to clear your mind.Show more
#4 - Bridgewater Park and Bridgewater Canal
Bridgewater Park
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Length: 2.6 mi • Est. 1 h 10 m
The canal side and on the old railway line are both very pretty and easy going. Show more
#5 - Philips Park Blue Route
Philips Park
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Length: 3.5 mi • Est. 1 h 40 m
#6 - Drinkwater Park
Drinkwater Park
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Length: 11.4 mi • Est. 5 h 17 m
Drinkwater park is excellent, great cycle paths! Cycle under the 13 arch viaduct and attempted to get through to Clifton Country park. Unfortunately the path to Clifton is really narrow with shear drops to the Irwell, not advisable with young kids. The car park at Drinkwater park is sometimes closed, but there is another car park near the entrance to Forest bank prison. Once on the bikes there is a bridge which takes you over the Irwell into Drinkwater park. The routes in and around Drinkwater park are excellent, wide and well surfaced. Show more
#7 - Monton and Astley Green Circular Walk
Manchester, Greater Manchester, England
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Length: 10 mi • Est. 4 h 35 m
Set off along the Bridgewater canal towards Astley Green to see the old Colliery winding gear which is still there and came back along the railway line long closed that ran from Leigh, through Tyldesley to Eccles. This is old industrial landscape. The Bridgewater Canal is one of the oldest in the country. Built by the Duke of Bridgewater to transport coal from his mines in South Lancashire to the industrial towns of the North and midlands. The rail line similarly transported coal when its turn came. The mines have closed, the mill chimneys no longer belch black smoke. The canal is used by leisure craft and the rail line is a tree shaded footpath. But industry left many marks in the landscape. Nearby to the remaining pit head at Astley Green is a large area of pit waste. Much of such waste was used as ballast in the construction of the M61. It was a good way of reducing old slag heaps and economical as it didn’t need to be transported far. Some stretches of the old rail line are planned to be used as a guided bus way for express buses from Leigh into Manchester. Leigh is reckoned to be one of the largest towns in Lancashire without a railway so it needs better transport links.Show more
#8 - Fallowfield to Reddish via Stockport Circular
Manchester, Greater Manchester, England
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Length: 15.8 mi
Starting on cycle route 85 on Princess Rd, heading south to the river Mersey, then west to Stockport, through Reddish before joining the Fallowfield Loop (route 60) to return.Show more
#9 - Bridgewater Canal Towpath: Manchester to Stretford
Manchester, Greater Manchester, England
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(8)
Length: 9 mi • Est. 4 h 25 m
#10 - Bridgewater Canal: Trafford to Worsley
Manchester, Greater Manchester, England
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Length: 7.4 mi • Est. 3 h 24 m
Historically, the Bridgewater Canal is one of the most important in the world. Opened in 1761 before the mechanical age, the construction was done by pick and shovels, wheelbarrow, horse and cart, men, women and children. The first part is through a heavy industrial landscape but the canal does provide a linear green lane. Trafford Park used to be parkland until late 19c. when it was developed as the first industrial estate in the world and remains the largest in Europe today. At Water's Meeting a canal goes towards Altrincham and forms part of a ring of canals called 'The Cheshire Ring'. A little further along you can gain access to the shopping complex of 'The Trafford Centre'. The construction of the Barton Aqueduct was one of Brindley's most remarkable engineering feats. It carried the canal over the River Irwell 38ft below. The stone aqueduct was replaced by the present swing aqueduct in 1894 when the Ship Canal was opened. At Patricroft the canal runs alongside the road for a considerable distance with trees and moored long boats in marked contrast to the industrial landscape. On reaching Monton you are greeted by the unusual prospect of seeing a lighthouse, or rather a lighthouse replica, full scale. This must be the only lighthouse on an inland waterway. At this point in 1851 Queen Victoria and Prince Albert took a barge to Worsley. There is a lot of history to Worsley and there are many information boards around to explain it all. The whole reason for the construction of the canal was to provide cheep transport for moving coal from the Duke of Bridgewater's mines to the center of Manchester. At Worsley Delph is a stone quarry backed by a large sandstone cliff. From here a system of tunnels and an underground inclined plain linked the Dukes mines to the canal. They stretch for an incredible 52 miles as far afield as Bolton. It was a very dangerous occupation in those days being a miner. The underground canals were last used for transporting coal in 1889. It is water draining from the old mines which makes the canal orange, which is iron oxide called ochre. The Green at Worsley was the site of much industry. The main relic of the works is the fountain which was the base of a factory chimney. The large houses around The Green today were built just after the demolition of the works in the 1900's. They were built for employee's of the estate. Finally the mock tudor packet house was built in late 18c. From the stone steps in-front of it, packet, or passenger boats, left for journeys to Manchester, Warrington and Runcorn.  Show more
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