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Best trails in Hope

1,396 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Hope, Derbyshire? AllTrails has 116 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Peak District National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Dovedale National Nature Reserve or Kinder Scout National Nature Reserve. Ready for some activity? There are 100 moderate trails in Hope ranging from 1.5 to 36 miles and from 475 to 2,086 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Hope
Top trails (116)
#1 - Fairholmes Derwent Valley
Peak District National Park
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Length: 8.2 mi • Est. 4 h 18 m
#2 - Ladybower Reservoir Circular Walk
Peak District National Park
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Length: 17.1 mi • Est. 8 h 52 m
#3 - The Great Ridge: Hollins Cross, Rick Tor and Lose Hill
Peak District National Park
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Length: 5 mi • Est. 3 h 3 m
This walk takes you from the car park on Mam Tor, up to the top and then along the ridge to Lose Hill. There's a bit of up and down, but the route stays at a good height above the Hope Valley to the south and the Vale of Edale to the north thereby commanding fantastic views in any direction you look. With good weather the distant views are excellent. Fom Lose Hill, you can get a great view down the Derwent Valley taking in many landmarks. Navigationally this walk is really simple, just follow the ridge to the end and return along the same path. The slope up to Back Tor requires care over the rocks, but the rest is nice and straightforward. The western end of this walk tends to be busy with many people flocking up to the top of Mam Tor or to take off in their hang-gliders. But whilst a popular spot, there's plenty of space. The term "The Great Ridge" was coined by W.A.Poucher and first used in his book "Peak Panorama, Kinder Scout to Dovedale" published in 1946 to describe the "great barrier which rises between Edale and Castleton." It is quite unique in the way it forms a high wall between the two valleys and as Poucher noted in 1946 there's a stone wall that runs along the whole length, although it is rather dilapidated in many places, more so now than when Poucher was strolling these hills over 50 years ago! Just down from the start point are the Blue John caverns and mines, all within a short walk away if interested. The road to or from Castleton has changed over the years. A road used to run up the side of Mam Tor from Castleton, but this has slipped away as parts of Mam Tor have fallen away. Repairs to the road have now stopped and in consequence the route is now via Winnats Pass, an amazing route through a deep limestone gorge. Mam Tor has been referred to as the Shivering Mountain to reflect its crumbling nature. It's not that stable now due to the alternating layers of shale and gritstone. This does, however, provide a great place for hang gliders. There are few days during the summer months when there are not one or two of the gliders soaring the currents from the mountain slopes. Quite fascinating to watch too. The ridge is criss-crossed by other paths as a quick look at maps and the ridge itself will show. These were originally used by people walking to work from one valley to the other. You can still sometimes see children walking across to or from school, but now it's mostly walkers! But these paths do present great opportunities to extend this walk.Show more
#4 - Bleaklow, River Alport, Black Clough
Peak District National Park
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Length: 10.9 mi • Est. 5 h 53 m
The great advantage of Ouzleden Clough is fast and fairly easy access to Rowlee Top with great views over Derwent and later Kinder. The road walk can be a bit long, but the views make up for it. Plenty of wildlife around and possibility for bird watching. Show more
#5 - Kinder Scout via Crowden Clough
Kinder Scout National Nature Reserve
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Length: 5.6 mi • Est. 3 h 10 m
This route takes in several of the highlights of Kinder Scout - the Woolpacks, Noe Stool and of course Jacob's Ladder (part of the Pennine Way). The views are of course extraordinary once you have gained the height to look across a vast amount of the Peak District from it's highest mountain. On a day with good weather this walk is wonderful as you walk up the path of Crowden Brook and then up to the Kinder Scout plateau. However, on days where there is mist, cloud and rain it's a very different proposition and calls for the correct clothing and navigation to avoid problems.Show more
#6 - Crowden Head and Kinder Low
Peak District National Park
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Length: 10.7 mi • Est. 5 h 34 m
This route takes you up via Crowden Clough, and head for the Downfall via Kinder Gates. The rest would be largely dependent on how the going was. On top, head up the 'brook', and work left to pick up the Kinder river fairly high up. Because of the work to prevent erosion there are several more new areas of bog each year, and finding the best routes needs care. At the Downfall - there was nothing. Just a few pools. The air was still clear, the sun was hot, and the views exceptional. Three of us shared the unusual solitude of a party-free Kinder. Then, cut up to Crowden Head, return to Crowden Tower, and complete the day via the Woolpacks and Jacobs Ladder. Show more
#7 - Barrow and Grinah Stones
Peak District National Park
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Length: 9.6 mi • Est. 5 h 6 m
One of the pleasures of visiting Barrow Stones from the Derwent is the number of possible routes. This one goes over the heights via Shepherds Meeting Stones, then down to the river and up the hill from the convergence. Go down to Ronksley via Grinah Stones, and across to Linch Clough from the Lower Small Clough cabins. The rest of the walk is just pleasant meandering around the Barrow Stones and a return down the Derwent valley. Show more
#8 - Bleaklow Ridge from Westend Gate
Peak District National Park
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Length: 12.8 mi • Est. 6 h 36 m
This route can be extended to the Barrow Stones, Derwent Valley, or the Eastern Edges, and varies depending on which routes are chosen in the various cloughs. This route down Grinah Grain follows a faint sheep track which contours round to join the shooters track into the Westend Valley. In uncertain weather it is advisable to take the track across Ridgewalk Moor and join the track directly.Show more
#9 - Derwent Edge from Foul Clough
Peak District National Park
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Length: 11.4 mi • Est. 6 h 7 m
You can always be certain the Eastern Moors will be thronged on a sunny day, and besides, it seems to be paved from Bradfield to Ladybower nowadays. Going up by Shireowlers gives you many choices of route on top. This route takes you left onto Abbey Bank passing opposite Ouzleden Clough, then drifts round to the right to catch the path towards Lost Lad. A loss of height down Sheepfold Clough, then an ascent by Foul Clough after crossing Abbey Brook takes you to a vantage point opposite the gorge, where soft grass can be a good excuse for resting. There are no paths, but also no difficulties in going round Crooked Clough. Then, follow the way to the obvious rocks the rest of the way to Derwent Edge and beyond is by flagstone path. Show more
#10 - Bamford Edge and Stanage Edge Circular
Peak District National Park
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Length: 5.7 mi • Est. 2 h 59 m
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