Best trails in Wasdale Head, Cumbria

403 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Wasdale Head, Cumbria? AllTrails has 17 great hiking trails, views trails, walking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Lake District National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Moss Rigg Wood or Lowther Park. Ready for some activity? There are 9 moderate trails in Wasdale Head ranging from 2.4 to 8.8 miles and from 177 to 2,942 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Wasdale Head, Cumbria
Top trails (17)
#1 - Scafell Pike from Wasdale Head
Lake District National Park
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Length: 5.7 mi • Est. 4 h 20 m
Scafell Pike is the highest mountain in England, at an elevation of 978 meters above sea level. The place has breathtaking landscapes and incredible views. Feel the pure air and connect with nature. It can be quite rocky and heavy winds on the way up but it's really an enjoyed challenge. You got to be prepared, this is a real adventure for those who are quite experienced. The river crossing can be quite difficult, so do wear waterproof walking boots and suitable equipments. Show more
#2 - Scafell Pike via Lake Head Car Park
Lake District National Park
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Length: 4.9 mi • Est. 4 h
The beginning of the trail can be found by leaving the car park and walking straight through the cow grail, continuing ahead. Do not turn to your right as the trail head is right before you cross the bridge (you cross a couple farm lands). Scafell Pike is the highest mountain in England, at an elevation of 978 meters above sea level. Show more
#3 - Great Gable, Kirk Fell and Pillar
Lake District National Park
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Length: 10.1 mi • Est. 7 h 17 m
Great Gable, Kirk Fell and Pillar from Wasdale HeadShow more
#4 - Great Gable Trail
Lake District National Park
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Length: 3.6 mi • Est. 3 h 14 m
Hike from Wasdale Head up to Great Gable. Steep assent with scree and boulders on last section. Show more
#5 - Hay Stacks, Kirk Fell, Great Gable, and Scafell Pike
Lake District National Park
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Length: 17.5 mi • Est. Multi-day
#6 - Illgill Head and Whin Rigg
Lake District National Park
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Length: 8.8 mi • Est. 5 h 19 m
#7 - Mosedale Horseshoe: Steeple, Pike, and Yewbarrow Circular
Lake District National Park
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Length: 10.5 mi • Est. 7 h 5 m
This is part of a 'Mosedale Circuit' which also includes Scoat Fell, Red Pike and Yewbarrow. You can park at either Overbeck Bridge or Wasdale Head. I chose the former with the road section first rather than at the end. There is no need to begrudge a 2-mile road section when accompanied with the magnificent scenery of Wasdale which is much more appreciated when on foot than in the confinds of a vehicle. Mosedale is a short off-shoot of the main valley and is much more intimate. I took the slightly shorter route directly towards 'Looking Stead' rather than continuing towards 'Black Sail' pass. The start of the 'High Level Route' starts a little way beyond the lowest point after Looking Stead and can be clearly seen snaking across the steep flanks. Early on there is a split in the path. The more well used being the lower one which dips down and over a rock step - both tracks only converging again just before Robinson's cairn. There is a very large plaque below the cairn to 'John Wilson Robinson' who died in 1907 and ends with -" We climb the hill: from end to end. Of all the landscape underneath, we find no place that does not breathe. Some gracious memory of our friend" From here Pillar Rock's eastern profile can be appreciated. It was the focal point for the earliest pioneers of rock climbing in the Lakes, offering an imposing atmospheric venue with superb climbs. The well known 'Slab and Notch' route (mod) is mainly used by climbers in descent. A zigzag path leads up the scree to the start of the 'Shamrock Traverse' which is not problematic except for a short slab section which needs caution. A scramble leads to the 'nick' behind Pisgah. More scrambling follows up the fellside behind to reach the summit plateau. It is a steep descent on rocky ground to Wind Gap and an equally rocky ascent to regain height to Black Crag before continuing the rocky theme to Scoat Fell summit cairn (on top of the wall). Red Pike is easily seen and can be virtually bee-lined, again rocky at first. After appreciating Red Pike and its position overlooking Mosedale it is worth deviating westwards from the main track to locate 'The Chair' in the boulder field a little below a prominent cairn. Sit awhile and let the magnificence of the scene waft over you. A better viewpoint of 'the Scafells' hard to imagine. After descending to cross Dore Head is the delightful scramble up Strriup Crag which after the scree consists of a number of short 'pitches' to reach the eastern and lower cairn of Yewbarrow. The ridge is all grass followed by a descent of scree filled gullies by to Overbec Bridge.Show more
#8 - Kirk Fell via Moses' Trod
Lake District National Park
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Length: 2.5 mi • Est. 2 h 36 m
#9 - Great Gable and Kirk Fell
Lake District National Park
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Length: 7.5 mi • Est. 5 h 20 m
Great Gable ranks as highly as Helvellyn and Scafell Pike in Lakeland. When seen from the foot of Wastwater, framed by Yewbarrow and Lingmell, it is the most classic of Lakeland views, and as an outline is the emblem of the National Park. Kirk Fell on the other hand is a lot less popular destination. It’s extensive summit plateau is defended by crags and steep slopes, but the views to the surrounding tops can not be bettered. From the Green at Wasdale Head the route is to Sty Head Pass on an easily angled track. This is the route most often used, but there is a lesser used track that keeps besides Linmell Beck called the Pony route which is less rocky. From the crossroads and stretcher-box at Sty Head Pass (a road over here from Borrowdale was once contemplated) it is up the Tourist or Breast Route which is well pitched and which blends in so well that it is difficult to distinguish from even a short distance away. It arrives at the summit directly. On remembrance Sunday each year fellwalkers converge to attend a short service organised by the Fell and Rock Climbing Club to remember those who have fallen in the conflict of wars. Anyone visiting Great Gable summit cairn must wander over the short distance to the Westmorland cairn, alas the majority don’t. It is named after two bothers named ‘Westmorland’ and not the once named former county of Westmorland. This spot simply takes your breath away as you contemplate Great Hell Gate, The Napes and the patchwork of fields far below. Allow yourself some time to take in the atmosphere and your good fortune to be in this spot. The way off is to join the North West Ridge route to Beck Head. It is rocky and has loose scree in places but just keep to the ridge. The views over Ennerdale are rewarding. From Beck Head it is a simple climb to the summit plateau of Kirk Fell via Rib End. There are two ‘tops’ the southern one with wind shelter being the higher. Fine views are to be had in all directions not least back to Great Gable. The way off to Black Sail Pass is via Kirkfell Crags where a very loose and boulder filled gully is the route followed. After the loose scree descended a more pleasant descent into Mosedale with views of Pillar are the reward. Mosedale is a delight with impressive Red Pike and Yewbarrow for companions. Show more
#10 - Pike of Blisco Round
Lake District National Park
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Length: 8.1 mi • Est. 5 h 28 m
A roundabout route to 'Pike 'O Blisco' or 'Pike of Blisco' if you prefer, by way of Side Pike, Lingmoor, Blea Tarn and Blake Rigg, returning from Red Tarn via Oxendale. Take note that the only way off the top section is to retrace your steps until an obvious track leads off left towards Blea Tarn. Lingmoor is named after the 'Ling' or heather hereabouts. The descent was down by the fence directly opposite the cairn towards Half-way House and Blea Tarn. The ascent to 'Blake Rigg' is on grass but generally 'pathless' with only the occasional trod to follow. There is a good sized cairn on this excellent viewing spot. Likewise there is only intermittent signs of paths across the sometimes craggy area to the summit of Pike of Blisco. This summit is craggy with plenty of clean rock on which to scramble between the two 'tops', the northern one, with its impressively sized cairn, obviously being the highest. The path descending into Oxendale was one of the first to be 'pitched' with stones in Cumbria. Thus with age it has blended into the landscape and is hard to pick out from any vantage point. Show more
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