Best trails in Ulverston, Cumbria

135 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Ulverston, Cumbria? AllTrails has 20 great hiking trails, trail running trails, walking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Yorkshire Dales National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Gisburn Forest or Brockholes Nature Reserve. Ready for some activity? There are 13 moderate trails in Ulverston ranging from 1.2 to 80.5 miles and from 36 to 2,109 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Ulverston, Cumbria
Top trails (20)
#1 - Cumbria Way
Ulverston, Cumbria, England
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Length: 80.5 mi • Est. Multi-day
The Cumbria Way is a famous long-distance path through the English Lake District. It spans all the way from Ulverston to Carlisle, mostly through the Lake District National Park. The route is mostly flat level path, but there are several exposed ridges. The hiker will pass through the Langdale and Borrowdale valleys.Show more
#2 - High Dam and Rusland Heights
Lake District National Park
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Length: 7.5 mi • Est. 4 h 6 m
As the fell tops were 'off-limit' today due to high winds a more sheltered lower walk was chosen. For starters there is now a proper car park (N.T. - pay and display). Nearby is Stott Park Bobbin Mill which is owned by English Heritage. Here were created the wooden Bobbins vital to the Lancashire weaving and spinning Industries and at the start is a nice reminder with an oversized 'bobbin' on top of which is a relief model of the area. An inscription which reads - "This is the water that turns the wheels that spins the lathe, that shapes the wood, to make the bobbins, to wind the thread, that wove the wealth of Lancashire".  "These are the trees, that cut by men will sprout again, to feed Stott Mill, to make the bobbins, to earn the pay, that fed the folk of Finsthwaite". Also there is a rather good map showing in much clearer detail than the OS maps the surrounding network of paths. Finsthwaite Tarn was made into the higher and lower dams to power a 32 feet water wheel at the bobbin mill which at one time employed as many as 250 workers Having never ventured beyond the tarn before, it was time to cross over to the Rusland Valley on the other side. It is a pleasant walk on quiet lanes to Rusland Cross and 'Tanyard House' , where there is indeed a tannery, before climbing back to Rustland Heights. The route is waymarked with 'white-topped' marker posts. Just as well as navigation in this tricky area could be difficult. Marker posts are also at hand along the heights to Great Ellerside. This does at least create a well trodden route which is easily followed without it becoming a 'free for all'. The return to  Finsthwaite is via a good track. St.Peters Church has an amazing painted vaulted ceiling. Situated in the grave yard is the grave of Clementina Sobieski Douglas “The Cumbrian Princess” reported to be the daughter of Bonnie Prince Charlie.Show more
#3 - Gummer's How
Lake District National Park
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Length: 1.4 mi • Est. 50 m
Gummer's How is a hill in the southern part of the Lake District, on the eastern shore of Windermere, near its southern end. How, derived from the Old Norse word haugr, is a common local term for a hill or mound. Although a relatively small hill (321 metres above sea level) by the standards of the Lake District, it is the highest of the foothills in the area, and commands excellent views, particularly along Windermere (the summit looks out over the magnificent Town Head House estate towards the lake), but also across to the Coniston fells and the central fells, as well as the broad panorama of Morecambe Bay. There is an OS trig point on the summit.Show more
#4 - Carron Crag and Top O' Selside
Lake District National Park
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Length: 9.7 mi • Est. 5 h 15 m
This route offers wonderful views of Coniston Water and Fells. The initial route to Low Parkamoor is on a fell road often used by mountain cyclists and some off-road vehicles. Parkamoor was done up by the National Trust as a holiday let, but was too remote for most people. It is now let to the Grizedale Artists who offer it as a sub-let. If cutting out the loop to Carron Crag make straight for the summit of Top O' Selside. After more good vantage points the route enters the confinds of the forest trees. To make a direct approach to Carron Crag meant going off-track over a rough old-felled section. The return from Carron Crag is on normal tracks back to Low Parkamoor. The ascent to Top O' Selside is over grass, heather and bracken. From here via Arnsbarrow Tarn is on intermittent tracks over varied ground. Brock Barrow offers a last viewpoint over the southern end of Coniston Water.Show more
#5 - Blawith Common and Beacon Tarn Circular Walk
Lake District National Park
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Length: 3.5 mi • Est. 1 h 56 m
#6 - Simpson Ground Reservoir and Chapel House Wood Circular
Lake District National Park
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Length: 3.4 mi • Est. 1 h 22 m
A well made gravel path takes you up top, followed by often muddy tracks through enchanted woodland. After circling around the lake, the tracks rejoin the main path and take you back to the car park.Show more
#7 - Beacon Tarn Circular
Lake District National Park
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Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 29 m
#8 - Pennington Reservoir and Knottallow Tarn
Ulverston, Cumbria, England
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Length: 6.2 mi • Est. 3 h 15 m
#9 - Bardsea, Baycliff and Ulverston
Ulverston, Cumbria, England
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Length: 12.3 mi • Est. 5 h 33 m
The walk takes in parts of the Cumbria Coastal Way (182 miles from Silverdale to Gretna) and the Cistercian Way ( 33 miles from Grange over Sands to Roe Island). Ulverston Canal is claimed to be the deepest, widest and straightest canal in the UK. It was opened in 1796. Slate and iron ore was traded and carried passenger ships to Scotland, Liverpool and London, as before the coming of the railways the furness peninsular was cut off - access only being possible via Morcambe Bay sands. The Hoad monument was erected in 1850 to commemorate the life of John Barrow, founder member of the Royal Geographic Society and explorer. Conishead Priory was a 12th c Augustinian Priory. It is now a Biddhist Meditation Centre and is open to the visitors. Sunbrick Stone Circle on Birkrigg Common dates from 1700 BC and is in a lovely position overlooking Morecambe Bay. 17th c Swarthmoor Hall was the home of George Fox, a powerhouse of the Society of Friends, known as the Quaker Movement. Outcast Ropewalk - The principal element of a ropeworks was a long straight and level surface. The ropes were made in standard lengths of 220 fathoms (1320ft)Show more
#10 - Bigland Barrow
Lake District National Park
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Length: 1.9 mi • Est. 57 m
Bigland Barrow is a hill in the English Lake District, near Backbarrow, Cumbria. It is the subject of a chapter of Wainwright's book The Outlying Fells of Lakeland.[1] It reaches 630 feet (190 m), and there is a concrete lookout tower on the summit which Wainwright describes as "a wartime relic". Wainwright's route is an anticlockwise circuit from Newby Bridge.Show more
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