Best trails in Keswick, Cumbria

1,723 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Keswick, Cumbria? AllTrails has 170 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Lake District National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Dalbeattie Forest or Bakestone Barrow Wood. Ready for some activity? There are 97 moderate trails in Keswick ranging from 1.2 to 13.3 miles and from 219 to 3,126 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Keswick, Cumbria
Top trails (170)
#1 - Catbells via Allerdale Ramble
Lake District National Park
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Length: 4.2 mi • Est. 2 h 38 m
#2 - Scafell Pike from Seathwaite
Lake District National Park
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Length: 10.9 mi • Est. 6 h 52 m
A circular and strenuous walk leading to the summit of Scafell Pike in Cumbria. Scafell Pike is the highest mountain in England and is located within the Southern Fells of the Lake District. The route climbs from Seathwaite to Styhead Tarn and Styhead Pass to join the Corridor Route to Lingmell Col. After enjoying the summit of Scafell Pike, the descent leads you via Esk Hause. Of the three highest peaks of Britain, Scafell Pike is a tougher climb than either Ben Nevis in Scotland or Snowdon in Wales. In part, this is due to the fact that it is not easily accessible from the more frequented valleys of Langdale and Borrowdale, while the character of the ground underfoot demands care by whatever route you choose. Once on the summit plateau, the walker has to negotiate a sea of rock which is irksome even in good weather. Nonetheless for those who make the pilgrimage the rewards are immense. They will have immersed themselves in the most dramatic mountain scenery this country has to offer and had the satisfaction of being momentarily the highest person in England. This walk is a serious mountain climb and should only be attempted in good weather conditions by experienced hill walkers. Ensure you are prepared with the proper equipment and a map. The route would pose a dangerous hazard for humans or dogs that are not accustomed to challenging hill walks. The total ascent is about 800 meters with some steep sections. Whilst some of the route follows well-made rock-built paths, there are several sections on rough rocky ground and areas with loose or crumbly stones underfoot which can be very slippery. There are a couple of rocky scrambles where you will need to use your hands. You will be sharing the fells with sheep. Allow 7-8 hours. Show more
#3 - Cat Bells, Maiden Moor and High Spy
Lake District National Park
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Length: 8.0 mi • Est. 4 h 44 m
This route takes you along the ridge from Catbells, across Maiden Moor and on to High Spy, before dropping down to Dale Head Tarn and the long but beautiful trek back beside the infant Newlands Beck. A beautiful grand day out. Show more
#4 - Seathwaite Circular
Keswick, Cumbria, England
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Length: 4.9 mi • Est. 1 h 58 m
Visit Lake District and explore one of the best trails in the Borrowdale valley. If you're up for an adventure and have a moderate level of fitness, you should definitely try this hike and enjoy the breathtaking views along the way. There's lots of rocks/pebbles so make sure to wear comfortable shoes/boots appropriate for hiking. You got to have energy to climb steep mountains but on the other hand, you will be mesmerised with the stunning landscape, waterfalls, wildlife and beautiful lakes. For more information and updates please visit: https://www.lakedistrict.gov.ukShow more
#5 - Coledale Circular Walk
Lake District National Park
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Length: 9.7 mi • Est. 6 h 28 m
#6 - Derwent Water Circular Walk
Lake District National Park
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Length: 10.8 mi • Est. 5 h 16 m
There can surely be no other more satisfying walk in the Lake District, that offers so much, with no height gained, is a decent length and occupies a whole day than a circuit of Derwent Water. This circuit is in an anticlockwise direction starting by the suspension bridge over the River Derwent near Portinscale. The option to include Nichol End marina is well worth the slight detour. The estate of Lingholm is traversed mainly in woodland. The views open-up again after the Hawes End Outdoor Centre. At Brandelhow Park are the carved wooden hands celebrating the centenary of the National Trust's first purchase in 2002 of these woods. Next follows Brandelhow Bay and the house on Branelhow Point. At the large house on the slopes of Cat Bells called Brackenburn used to live Sir Hugh Walpole. In 1930 Walpole began his series of historical romance novels called 'Rogue Herries' which were set in Cumberland. Following on is Manesty Park and the amazing board walk of recycled plastic to cross the wet section at the head of the lake. Note that even this can get covered in severe wet conditions. Crossing the newly renovated bridge is the half-way point. Climbers can usually be spotted on Shepherd's Crag on most days. Toilets are passed before reaching the Lodore Hotel - it says walkers are welcome !! If required the ferry can be used from here to return to Keswick. After a short road and woodland section the lake shore is regained at a National Trust car park. On our visit the lake was at a very low level and walking on the shingle was not a problem, but conditions can vary. Looking at the lines of debris on the shore shows the varying water levels. At Calfclose Bay lookout for the half submerged centenary stone. This is to celebrate 100yrs of the National Trust. There is a conveniently placed bench on the headland. The large island opposite here is St. Herbert's Island. After the pasture land the route swings inland at Stable Hills re-emerging at Strandshag Bay opposite which is Lord's Island. The viewpoint of Friar's Crag follows where there is a memorial to Ruskin. The boat landings has a newly constructed promenade with picnic tables and benches. From here it is either through the center of Keswick or you can cross Crow Park from infront of the 'Theatre By The Lake', to reach the far end of The Headlands. After crossing the road bridge over the River Greta a path alongside the Keswick showground returns to the starting point.Show more
#7 - Hawes End, Cat Bells, and Derwent Circular
Lake District National Park
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Length: 4.1 mi • Est. 2 h 32 m
#8 - Skiddaw
Lake District National Park
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Length: 6.2 mi • Est. 3 h 57 m
#9 - Ullock Pike, Long Side, Carl Side, Skiddaw and Bakestall
Lake District National Park
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Length: 7.2 mi • Est. 4 h 54 m
This is a popular route for Skiddaw with ample parking along the narrow Orthwaite road at the first (or last from the opposite direction) lay-by. After crossing the agricultural fields the area known as 'The Watchers' is the start of the ridge proper. On the steeper sections up to Ullock Pike there are exposed stretches of shale rock to climb. At the summit cairn are exceptionally good views over Bassenthwaite Lake. Indeed this whole ridge looks impressive when viewed from the lakeshore at Broadness Farm especially in August when the heather is in full bloom. Longside Edge then follows to the summit of Long Side itself, then quickly by the third top of Carl Side which is broad and rounded. The ascent of Skiddaw from the hause is on a path which slants to the left of the broad SW. ridge on scree steepening as the summit plateau is neared which is some half-mile long. If you are lucky with the weather your reward will be the unrestricted views as enjoyed by Victorians' on their excursions from Keswick. The descent is an easy affair when a wire fence is picked up which is followed to Bakestall. A small trod is followed easily seen as it crosses Dead Beck to reach Cockup, a little visited minor top. A descent on grass is made to reach the intake wall and gate. A long straight track is taken towards Melbrecks where the Orthwaite road awaits on a bend. Follow this back to the start or alternatively navigate the paths via Hole House and Barkbeth farms.Show more
#10 - Walla Crag via Ashness Bridge
Lake District National Park
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Length: 6.0 mi • Est. 3 h 19 m
This walk is a variant of similar Keswick to Walla Cragg walks. Instead of following the route by the lake, this walk will take you parallel to Derwentwater but elevated. You get fantastic views of Derwentwater.Show more
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