Best camping trails in Cumbria, England

501 Reviews
Explore the most popular camping trails in Cumbria with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of camping trails in Cumbria, England
Top trails (38)
#1 - Seathwaite Circular
Keswick, Cumbria, England
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(23)
Length: 4.9 mi • Est. 1 h 58 m
Visit Lake District and explore one of the best trails in the Borrowdale valley. If you're up for an adventure and have a moderate level of fitness, you should definitely try this hike and enjoy the breathtaking views along the way. There's lots of rocks/pebbles so make sure to wear comfortable shoes/boots appropriate for hiking. You got to have energy to climb steep mountains but on the other hand, you will be mesmerised with the stunning landscape, waterfalls, wildlife and beautiful lakes. For more information and updates please visit: https://www.lakedistrict.gov.ukShow more
#2 - Skiddaw
Lake District National Park
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Length: 6.2 mi • Est. 3 h 57 m
#3 - Buttermere Haystacks Circular Walk
Lake District National Park
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Length: 8.0 mi • Est. 4 h 41 m
This route starts at the little Church in Buttermere (free parking along the roadside, pay parking facilities are around the Buttermere area also), then follow Buttermere lakeside then up to Haystacks. The ascent to Haystacks is well within the capabilities of most people. Children would be able to tackle this walk providing plenty of time was taken into account. The descent needs a little care with children but there are plenty of hand-holding locations on the way down. This route is very picturesque and offers plenty of rest stops to admire the surrounding views. There are a number of tarns and a little bothie along the route. Ideal for photographers. Just prior to Haystacks summit is Innominate Tarn. Haystacks was Wainrights (Popular Walker and author of several Lake District books) favorite fell, and had is ashes scattered at this tarn after he died. The descent takes you down a craggy patch at the beginning of the descent. If you are with younger children just taken your time and offer plenty of handholding over this little bit. Once past that its a steady descent to Buttermere lake. You follow the lake back via a local pub. The views are breathtaking and if you are short on time and want to take in a true Lake District fell - this is the one for you.Show more
#4 - Cumbria Way
Ulverston, Cumbria, England
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(5)
Length: 80.5 mi • Est. Multi-day
The Cumbria Way is a famous long-distance path through the English Lake District. It spans all the way from Ulverston to Carlisle, mostly through the Lake District National Park. The route is mostly flat level path, but there are several exposed ridges. The hiker will pass through the Langdale and Borrowdale valleys.Show more
#5 - Bowness-on-Windermere and Queen Adelaide's Hill
Lake District National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(33)
Length: 4.3 mi • Est. 1 h 44 m
Discover the small and charming village of Windermere situated in the Lake District and it's scenic landscapes. This is a moderate 12km trail that takes you around the best spots in town with an exclusive view of the lake. On the way, you will see some wildlife, forest and you can also visit some of the local café/bars and museums. Get to explore the many outdoors activities, such as mountain biking, horse riding, boat tours, climbing and much more. Guaranteed fun and adventure for all!Show more
#6 - Tarn Hows
Lake District National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(55)
Length: 1.8 mi • Est. 1 h 4 m
#7 - Coast To Coast Walk
St Bees, Cumbria, England
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Length: 175.1 mi • Est. Multi-day
Originally described by Alfred Wainwright in his 1973 book A Coast to Coast Walk, this hike covers 192 miles from Saint Bees and the Irish Sea to Robin Hood's Bay and the North Sea. It is customary to dip your boot in the water at each end. The walk goes through three major National Parks: the Lake District National Park, the Yorkshire Dales National Park, and the North York Moors National Park. Despite being an unofficial route that has relatively few signposts, this through hike is one of the most popular in the UK. Dent, High Stile, Helm Crag (optional), Helvellyn and St Sunday Crag, Kidsty Pike, Nine Standards Rigg/Hartley Fell, Carlton Bank, Cringle Moor/High Blakey Moor/Glaisdale Moor, and Urra Moor are hiked while on this trail. A list of route segments can be found here: https://www.alltrails.com/lists/coast-to-coast-walk-northern-englandShow more
#8 - Coast to Coast Walk Segment 1: St Bees to Ennerdale Bridge
Lake District National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(12)
Length: 14.6 mi • Est. 7 h 52 m
For a list of all the segments of the full Coast to Coast Walk, see here: https://www.alltrails.com/lists/coast-to-coast-walk-northern-england The entire route can be found here: https://www.alltrails.com/trail/england/cumbria/wainwrights-coast-to-coast-walkShow more
#9 - Helvellyn, Swirrel Edge and Striding Edge
Lake District National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(21)
Length: 7.5 mi • Est. 4 h
Helvellyn is the third-highest point in England and also in the Lake District. The scenery includes three deep glacial coves and two sharp-topped ridges on the eastern side (Striding Edge and Swirral Edge). One of the strangest feats to take place on this mountain was the landing and take-off of a small airplane on the summit in 1926. Since early 2018 the summit of Helvellyn including both Striding and Swirral Edges and the wider Glenridding Common are now managed by the John Muir Trust, under a three-year lease with the Lake District Park Authority. There are many routes up Helvellyn, but ascending via Striding Edge is thought to be the most spectacular of all. But please note that this narrow ridge has a reputation of being scary and difficult. Swirral Edge is often disregarded as just more of the same. However, it isn't, and is certainly checking out, hence this route taking you on both Edges. In descent, it starts with a loose stoney drop onto a short steep ridge of jumbled boulders which often require a bit of down-scrambling. Be careful to avoid a loose and nasty gully going off to the left, into Keppel Cove. Slipping is easy in descent. Crossing Striding Edge and Swirrel Edge is best undertaken in summer when the rock is dry and the wind gentle. A moderate breeze is good to keep you cool, but windy can easily knock you off, or unbalance you. The walk starts in the village of Glenridding where there is a large Lake District National Park Authority pay and display car park.Show more
#10 - Scafell Pike from Seathwaite Circular Walk
Lake District National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(3)
Length: 12.4 mi • Est. 7 h 46 m
A circular and strenuous walk leading to the summit of Scafell Pike in Cumbria. Scafell Pike is the highest mountain in England with an elevation of 978 metres above sea level and is located within the Southern Fells of the Lake District. The route climbs from Seathwaite to Styhead Tarn and Styhead Pass to join the Corridor Route to Lingmell Col. After enjoying the summit of Scafell Pike, the descent leads you via Esk Hause. Of the three highest peaks of Britain, Scafell Pike is a tougher climb than either Ben Nevis in Scotland or Snowdon in Wales. In part, this is due to the fact that it is not easily accessible from the more frequented valleys of Langdale and Borrowdale, while the character of the ground underfoot demands care by whatever route you choose. Once on the summit plateau, the walker has to negotiate a sea of rock which is irksome even in good weather. Nonetheless for those who make the pilgrimage the rewards are immense. They will have immersed themselves in the most dramatic mountain scenery this country has to offer and had the satisfaction of being momentarily the highest person in England. This walk is a serious mountain climb and should only be attempted in good weather conditions by experienced hill walkers. Ensure you are prepared with the proper equipment and an OS map. The route would pose a dangerous hazard for humans or dogs that are not accustomed to challenging hill walks. The total ascent is about 800 metres with some steep sections. Whilst some of the route follows well-made rock-built paths, there are several sections on rough rocky ground and areas with loose or crumbly stones underfoot which can be very slippery. There are a couple of rocky scrambles where you will need to use your hands. You will be sharing the fells with sheep. Allow 7-8 hours. Show more
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