Best waterfall trails in Ambleside, Cumbria

306 Reviews
Explore the most popular waterfall trails near Ambleside with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of waterfall trails in Ambleside, Cumbria
Top trails (16)
#1 - Ambleside and Troutbeck via Wansfell
Lake District National Park
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Length: 7.4 mi • Est. 4 h 15 m
Ambleside is the start of many a fine walk and consequently it has one of the highest concentrations of outdoor gear shops anywhere in the country! This walk over Wansfell Pike to Troutbeck and return via Skelghyll is justifiably one of the most popular. Done clockwise it is steep on the ascent and gentle on the descent. Leaving town by the lane behind the Salutation Hotel the Stockghyll Waterfalls can be visited. A lower footbridge can be crossed to the northern side, returning via a higher bridge to resume the walk up the lane. Even after rain this is virtually a dry route on account of the maintenance of the paths to cope with the wear and tear by the many feet. Wansfell Pike is a fine viewpoint over Windermere and to the more distant fells of Coniston. The Mortal Man pub lies in the linear village of Troutbeck along which are three "wells/drinking troughs" dedicated to St. Margaret, St. James and St. John. Lunch was taken at the 'Pillar' in a field alongside Robin Lane. Views of Windermere continue along the tracks to Skelghyll and Jenkins Crag. In Skelghyll Woods is 'The Grand Fir', which stands 58m (190ft) high. It was planted in 1860 and has been crowned 'The Tallest Tree in Cumbria', 'The Tallest Grand Fir in England' and is in the top six tallest trees in England. To compare - Nelson's Column is 169ft. The return is via the delights of Waterhead, Borrans Park and Galava Roman Fort. The Rothay is crossed at a footbridge dedicated to the memory of Bronwen Nixon who was the owner of the Rothey Manor Hotel and who was murdered by a chief at the hotel on January 9th 1986.Show more
#2 - Stockghyll Force
Lake District National Park
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Length: 1.1 mi • Est. 37 m
This is a beautiful short walk up to a wonderful waterfall. Show more
#3 - Rydal Water Circular
Moss Rigg Wood
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Length: 2.8 mi • Est. 1 h 35 m
A circular walk from the village of Rydal in the Lake District, Cumbria. The walking route performs a loop around Rydal Water, a small lake covering an area of a third of a square kilometre. Rydal Water may be one of the smallest lakes in the Lake District, however what it lacks in size it more than makes up for in sheer beauty as it sits glistening at the foot of Loughrigg Fell. This area inspired much of Wordsworth's poetry and you will pass his former home. The lake is supplied and drained by the River Rothay, which flows from Grasmere upstream and towards Windermere downstream. You will enjoy beautiful woodlands, lakeside views and follow a stretch of the old coffin road plus Loughrigg Terrace, one of the most beautiful half-miles in lakeland. The walk includes a few climbs and descents throughout, with a couple of steep sections but nothing too long. The total ascent is only around 150 metres. If follows stretches of well-made stone paths and tracks for the most part. You will need to negotiate several gates and footbridges but there are no stiles. You will come across grazing sheep and there are two road crossings that need care.Show more
#4 - Skelwith Force from Elterwater
Lake District National Park
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Length: 3.5 mi • Est. 1 h 24 m
#5 - Grasmere, Stone Arthur, Heron Pike, Nab Scar-Rydal, Loughrigg Fell, Grasmere
Lake District National Park
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Length: 11.0 mi • Est. 6 h 54 m
#6 - Troutbeck Round
Ambleside, Cumbria, England
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Length: 12.6 mi • Est. 7 h 46 m
From Church Bridge it is a two mile warm-up before the steep ascent of Troutbeck Tongue. It is then an easy grassy descent north to an ancient cairn before heading down to cross Trout Beck and an area of ancient settlements. The climb at the side of Sad Gill is a delight with a little light scrambling alongside the many waterfalls adding to the interest. By contrast the route to Stony Cove Pike alongside the wall seams a long slog. Wainwright describes it as a route with merit. The descent to Threshthwaite Mouth is both steep and very rocky and is tricky in snow and ice. The ascent to Thornthwaite Crag although steep and loose in places is nowhere as rocky. Thornthwaite Beacon is a distinctive pillar seen for miles around (good wall and rocks for shelter). The return via Froswick, Ill Bell and Yoke to meet the Garbon Pass is a promenade with Ill Bell with its three cairns the steepest of the ascents. This is a popular ridge walk and has been constructed as a 'super highway' (drainage channels alongside) by the park authorities. The descent of the Garbon Pass road gives excellent views all the way back.Show more
#7 - Blea Rigg, Easdale Tarn, Silver How
Lake District National Park
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Length: 8.3 mi • Est. 4 h 49 m
Car parking in Grasmere is expensive so this walk begins from the lay-by located on the A591 before heading for Easedale Tarn and the climb to Blea Rigg. The walk across the ridge to Silver How is excellent with the snow-capped fells holding your attention every step of the way. you may not want to leave the Silver How summit until the setting sun convinces you to make a move towards Tweedies Bar for reflective post-walk refreshment.Show more
#8 - Great Langdale Beck and Wasdale Head Circular
Lake District National Park
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Length: 23.5 mi • Est. Multi-day
This stunning trek takes you into dramatic landscape, challenging climbs and stunning views. It's hard work but worth it. Come prepared, well-equipped and eager!Show more
#9 - Old Dungeon Ghyll Circular
Lake District National Park
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Length: 6.9 mi • Est. 4 h 36 m
A circular walk taking in some of the most beautiful views that the Langdale Valley has to offer. This route is for those who are looking for something a little different in the Langdale area and don't mind a little scrambling (avoided if necessary). Loft Crag is one of the Langdale 'Pikes' and is the culmination of the rock buttress of Gimmer Crag, the jewel in the Langdale's climbing crown. It is located next to 'Pike 'O Stickle', both enjoying being set high above Mickleden. The route is from the Old Dungeon Ghyll car park. From behind the hotel leave the Mickleden path glancing upwards towards the trees. After crossing a stone slab bridge and before a gate turn left following the fence, then climbing steeply up the face of the scree-slope. This is the climbers route to Gimmer Crag but is very faint on the ground and twists and turns up the hillside. Try to keep to its line. On reaching Gimmer Crag you can get-up close to its impressive bulk and appreciate the climbers skill in assailing its intricacies. This route is to the right or east and the 'South-east Gully'. Don't climb it directly but choose any desired route up the easily scrambled rocks well to the right. Alternatively traverse further east to the next gully, this is 'Wainwrights' 10ft. chock-stone route. Don't go to the top directly but traverse left (west) on a series of grassy ledges to the exalted position at the very top of Gimmer Crag which is the end to its' every climb. Retrace your steps and try your hand at a number of easy scrambles to the top of Loft Crag. From here to Pike 'O Stickle is straightforward passing the top of the gully of 'South-screes' the site of a 'Stone-age' axe factory on account of a vein of hard rock hereabouts. The view from here back to Gimmer Crag is both impressive and inspiring. The path to Stake Pass used to be very wet but has been much improved in recent years, as has the descent to Mickleden which has been 'pitched'. On the return you cannot but be impressed by the grandeur of Pike 'O Stickle with it's continuous steep slope and scree runs.Show more
#10 - Grisedale Tarn
Lake District National Park
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Length: 4.7 mi • Est. 3 h 18 m
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