Best partially paved trails in Ambleside, Cumbria

366 Reviews
Explore the most popular partially paved trails near Ambleside with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of partially paved trails in Ambleside, Cumbria
Top trails (14)
#1 - Loughrigg Fell Circular
Moss Rigg Wood
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Length: 7.6 mi • Est. 4 h 3 m
Enjoy this 12km trail around Loughrigg Fell, it's amazing park and nature all around. There are many activities and amazing views, a great place to disconnect and enjoy with friends and family. The route is suitable for dogs in some parts and there are great views of the lakes and surrounding mountains. The climb to the peak is not too hard and well worth the effort.Show more
#2 - Rydal Water Circular
Moss Rigg Wood
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Length: 2.8 mi • Est. 1 h 35 m
A circular walk from the village of Rydal in the Lake District, Cumbria. The walking route performs a loop around Rydal Water, a small lake covering an area of a third of a square kilometre. Rydal Water may be one of the smallest lakes in the Lake District, however what it lacks in size it more than makes up for in sheer beauty as it sits glistening at the foot of Loughrigg Fell. This area inspired much of Wordsworth's poetry and you will pass his former home. The lake is supplied and drained by the River Rothay, which flows from Grasmere upstream and towards Windermere downstream. You will enjoy beautiful woodlands, lakeside views and follow a stretch of the old coffin road plus Loughrigg Terrace, one of the most beautiful half-miles in lakeland. The walk includes a few climbs and descents throughout, with a couple of steep sections but nothing too long. The total ascent is only around 150 metres. If follows stretches of well-made stone paths and tracks for the most part. You will need to negotiate several gates and footbridges but there are no stiles. You will come across grazing sheep and there are two road crossings that need care.Show more
#3 - Latterbarrow and The Sawreys
Lake District National Park
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Length: 9.3 mi • Est. 4 h 59 m
#4 - Wray Castle and Belle Grange
Lake District National Park
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Length: 5.9 mi • Est. 3 h 2 m
This is a walk for when the weather on the 'tops' prevents a more elevated route choice. The prevailing wind is westerly so a route along the western fringes of Windermere with the added protection of the trees is a safe bet. Starting from Wray Castle (N.T.) which used to be leased out to a college devoted to the training of maritime naval officers, but is now open to the public for the first time. The grounds which have always been open for exploration have undergone a transformation with numerous activities and amenities added. Wray Castle was built in 1840 for a Dr Dawson, a retired Liverpool Surgeon and was paid for from his wife's inheritance from a gin fortune. When she saw it she refused to stay there. The architect then drank himself to death. After following the lakeside paths to High Wray Bay the recently much improved track leading all the way to the ferry at Ferry Nab is joined. An alternative starting point is at the end of the tarmac road at Red Nab. Belle Grange Bay used to be the ferry point, crossing to Miller Ground Landing. A ghostly figure still calls the ferryman, said to be one of a wedding party. On October 19th 1635 47 guest retuning from a ceremony in Hawkeshead were drowned when the ferry sank. Sightings of the phantom boat are accompanied by terrible screams and cries. From Belle Grange the bridlepath, once the main horse and carriage road between Hawkeshead and Windermere, is followed to reach Scab Moss, one of several recently restored peat bogs or 'mires' within the forest area. Mires support a range of dragonflies as well as three types of sundaes - carnivorous plants. Here the more prominent forest road was followed before turning off on at first an indistinct path to reach another wet land area at Nor Moss where there is a substantial bird hide for ornithologists to remain concealed. The track eventually emerges to meet the road at Beyondfields Farm which is followed to High Wray. It is a simple walk along the lane back to the entrance to Wray Castle. A new route has only recently been added to allow campers to follow the Windermere shore-line to reach the Wray Castle Estate, but can be enjoyed by all.Show more
#5 - Hawkeshead to Tarn Howes Circular
Lake District National Park
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Length: 6.5 mi • Est. 3 h 42 m
#6 - Steel Fell, Dead Pike and Calf Crag
Lake District National Park
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Length: 8.3 mi • Est. 4 h 19 m
Steel Fell and Helm Crag are two iconic fells (high and barren landscape feature) overlooking Grasmere in the Lake District. Having climbed Steel Fell, there is an undulating ridge reaching the col of Bracken Hause just before Helm Crag. Doing this walk on a fine day is pretty straight forward, in mist and poor visibility it gets more difficult. The ridges between Steel Fell and Calf Crag, and then to Helm Crag are sometimes wide and the path is not always clearly defined. The start point is Grasmere village where there are various pay and display car parks throughout.Show more
#7 - Grizdale Mountain Bike Circular
Lake District National Park
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Length: 10.8 mi
This is a nice mountain bike route for those who like to go off road with an equal split of on/off road sections. The loop starts at the Windermere Ferry, goes through Near and Far Sawrey to Hawshead. From there, it climbs via a fairly steep bridleway to the mountain bike tracks through the Grizdale Forrest. Some of the off road sections can be challenging but this is a very scenic route and the challenge is well rewarded by the stunning views.Show more
#8 - Grasmere to Ambleside Coffin Route
Lake District National Park
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Length: 3.8 mi • Est. 1 h 32 m
#9 - The Windermere Way Section 3
Ambleside, Cumbria, England
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Length: 14.2 mi • Est. 7 h 21 m
Starting at Skelwith Bridge and finishing at Lakeside is the third section of the 3-day 'Windermere Way' round Windermere walk. This third part of the Windermere Way is the longest, but by this time (if walking on consecutive days) you should have 'the wind behind you' and picked up the fitness and momentum to 'finish the course'. It is also the 'flattest', only requiring a day's modest ascent total. There are no summits on this side (unless you wish to also include Latterbarrow), only the minor 'top' of Stott Park Heights. You also encounter the lake shore like nowhere else on the round. From Skelwith Bridge the minor road to Skelwith Fold is taken and at the caravan site entrance  a sharp right gains a quiet footpath down to meet the Hawkshead road. Unfortunately tarmac is the order of the day until reaching the Wray Castle entrance beyond which a bridleway drops down to High Wray Bay. A lot of work has only just been completed here transforming what was once a wet and rough track into a well-drained even surfaced walking and cycle route. This improvement has been continued all along as far as the ferry. It is very popular with mountain bikers and walkers who have crossed by boat from Waterhead to Wray Castle and return by the Sawrey ferry. You too may return to the Bowness side by the ferry if you do not fancy doing this side in one leg. From the ferry south, the character changes to one with fewer people and with some faint tracks interspersed with quiet lanes. There is no indication of a right of way, but neither is there one that the route may be 'private'. After a number of boat houses a gate with a NT sign attached is past through. After following the minor road it is back to the shore-line which is followed in pleasing fashion at Cunsey. It is shortly back to the road for a stiff climb at the top of which a very indistinct path leads back to the shore through woodland. This area is part of the Graythwaite Estate and is waymarked to keep you from 'straying' from the designated route. After passing a boathouse the route was less distinct but arrived at the right point on the road adjacent to the main entrance to the YMCA activity centre. Here opposite is a 'permitted' path leading steeply to the viewpoint of Stott Park Heights. Just follow the most obvious route as it winds up through the trees. A seat with dedication adorns the rocky outcrop. It is a simple route to navigate to the much admired area of High Dam, a Tarn Hows in miniature. The main descent path is followed before branching off towards the village of Finsthwaite.Show more
#10 - Loughrigg, Grasmere and Rydal
Lake District National Park
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Length: 8.8 mi • Est. 4 h 56 m
By starting this 'round' in the Skelwith area you avoid the parking in Grasmere. After delightful Loughrigg Tarn a path through the grounds of High Close YHA leads conveniently on to the open fell of Dow Bank towards Grasmere where good views are to be enjoyed. Skirting around the base of Silver How the path and wall descend to the boat hire/cafe on Gasmere. After a dalliance in Grasmere the way was to Dove Cottage and a look at the revamped Daffodil Hotel (formally the Prince of Wales). From Penny Rock, the weir and footbridge it is pleasant alongside Rydal Water to Pelter Bridge. The stepping stones across the River Rothay were well under water today. The return to Skelwith was via the secluded Fox Ghyll which joins the 'trade route' from Ambleside at the hause. It is then an easy descent back to Skelwith Tarn. Show more
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