Best historic site trails in Ambleside, Cumbria

271 Reviews
Explore the most popular historic site trails near Ambleside with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of historic site trails in Ambleside, Cumbria
Top trails (7)
#1 - Loughrigg Fell Circular
Moss Rigg Wood
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Length: 7.6 mi • Est. 4 h 3 m
Enjoy this 12km trail around Loughrigg Fell, it's amazing park and nature all around. There are many activities and amazing views, a great place to disconnect and enjoy with friends and family. The route is suitable for dogs in some parts and there are great views of the lakes and surrounding mountains. The climb to the peak is not too hard and well worth the effort.Show more
#2 - Latterbarrow and The Sawreys
Lake District National Park
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Length: 9.3 mi • Est. 4 h 59 m
#3 - Blelham Tarn and Wray Castle
Lake District National Park
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Length: 4.8 mi • Est. 2 h 29 m
A perfect half day leisurely walk which is far more varied and attractive than 'Tarn Hows'. It is also much more quite, and there's free parking at Wray Castle without being a member of the National Trust.Show more
#4 - Wray Castle and Belle Grange
Lake District National Park
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Length: 5.9 mi • Est. 3 h 2 m
This is a walk for when the weather on the 'tops' prevents a more elevated route choice. The prevailing wind is westerly so a route along the western fringes of Windermere with the added protection of the trees is a safe bet. Starting from Wray Castle (N.T.) which used to be leased out to a college devoted to the training of maritime naval officers, but is now open to the public for the first time. The grounds which have always been open for exploration have undergone a transformation with numerous activities and amenities added. Wray Castle was built in 1840 for a Dr Dawson, a retired Liverpool Surgeon and was paid for from his wife's inheritance from a gin fortune. When she saw it she refused to stay there. The architect then drank himself to death. After following the lakeside paths to High Wray Bay the recently much improved track leading all the way to the ferry at Ferry Nab is joined. An alternative starting point is at the end of the tarmac road at Red Nab. Belle Grange Bay used to be the ferry point, crossing to Miller Ground Landing. A ghostly figure still calls the ferryman, said to be one of a wedding party. On October 19th 1635 47 guest retuning from a ceremony in Hawkeshead were drowned when the ferry sank. Sightings of the phantom boat are accompanied by terrible screams and cries. From Belle Grange the bridlepath, once the main horse and carriage road between Hawkeshead and Windermere, is followed to reach Scab Moss, one of several recently restored peat bogs or 'mires' within the forest area. Mires support a range of dragonflies as well as three types of sundaes - carnivorous plants. Here the more prominent forest road was followed before turning off on at first an indistinct path to reach another wet land area at Nor Moss where there is a substantial bird hide for ornithologists to remain concealed. The track eventually emerges to meet the road at Beyondfields Farm which is followed to High Wray. It is a simple walk along the lane back to the entrance to Wray Castle. A new route has only recently been added to allow campers to follow the Windermere shore-line to reach the Wray Castle Estate, but can be enjoyed by all.Show more
#5 - Latterbarrow and Wray Castle
Lake District National Park
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Length: 4.1 mi • Est. 2 h 10 m
Latterbarrow is a well known viewpoint with it's impressive obelisk recognisable from afar. It is easily reached from the Hawkshead to Wray road. There are paths on both sides of Blelham Tarn neither of which go close to the water. This route is the southern one which gives better views. An improved path has just been constructed from High Wray Bay alongside Windermere on the Wray Castle Estate. The castle is still unoccupied but is occasionally open by the National Trust to guided tours.Show more
#6 - Little Langdale Valley and Great Langdale Valley
Lake District National Park
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Length: 9.5 mi • Est. 5 h 26 m
This route links together Little and Great Langdale- it could equally be entitled 'The 5 - Pubs Walk'. Also visited is Cathedral Quarry, Slater's Bridge, The Ting Mound and Blea Tarn. The Ting Mound was used as an open-air meeting place for local government which was established by Viking settlers from the tenth century. Adjacent is Castle Howe upon which have been found the remains of an Iron Age hill fort. Little Langdale was also the home of the notorious 19th century smuggler Lanty Slee who had many stills in the quarries and caves for distilling 'moonshine whisky'. The Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotel is usually known as the ODG where the Hikers Bar has had a long association with the rock climbers who come to climb Raven Crags or Gimmer Crag.Show more
#7 - Ambleside to Penrith via Red Screes, Angle Tarn and Arthurs Pike
Ambleside, Cumbria, England
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Length: 23.7 mi • Est. Multi-day
This trail takes in some of the most beautiful countryside in Wales and end at the medieval ruins of Penrith Castle.Show more