Entdecken Sie die beliebtesten Städte in Kabarole mit handgefertigten Wanderkarten und Wegbeschreibungen sowie detaillierten Bewertungen und Fotos von Wanderern, Campern und Naturliebhabern wie Ihnen.

wandern
steinig
1 month ago

wandern
schlammig
2 months ago

Outstanding hike. My hardest yet. We had a great guide named Latif and because we started so late, we had a very friendly and helpful soldier accompany us. The recording only got 3.3 of the 13.5 miles that we did unfortunately. the 13.5 miles was from the place where driving to the trailhead was no longer an option and stopped when we got to a drive able area in Kazingo. Very spectacular views of the Rwenzori Mountains, the forest was very jungle- like. Very very beautiful. Gorgeous greenery. We even saw a couple of Grey Cheek Monkies. Good thing about it being rainy season is that the weather was very comfortable and refreshing to get rained on. Bad thing is that the trail in parts was very slippery, and when we reached the top I was soaked and the wind made it quite cold. One of the most adventurous and exciting and difficult days of my life. All wrapped into one. I highly recommend this trail. I am told that we traveled about 1/5 of the way to the top-most part of the Rwenzori Mountains. Hopefully next time I will be prepared to travel higher!

wandern
schlammig
scrambling
steinig
8 months ago

The Weisman’s Peak trail is far, far more challenging than any of the other major East African treks - especially when it rains. We were not prepared for just how steep some sections were and the muddy conditions were exhausting. There is also a lot of rock scrambling. All that said it is a spectacular trek - you just need to be physically very well prepared. We’ve trekked in Nepal many times as well as most of the other East African mountain ranges and found the Ruwenzori’s to be far more difficult. than all of these though definitely worth the discomfort.

wandern
abseits des Weges
schlammig
schnee
steinig
Mon Dec 17 2018

Having grabbed our attention many years ago, The Rwenzori mountains this year finally got our feet moving. Over millennia their existence was suspected or known as evidenced in various Greek and Roman sources. 19th and early 20th century explorers penetrated into the ranges; some of the peaks are named in their honor. For Europeans they formed part of the search for the source of the Nile River. Forming the border between Uganda and DR Congo in the west, the range forms the western side of the great rift valley of Africa. Well organised by RTC [ Rwenzori Trekking Company], I did the walk with five family, 3 guides and 12 porters, albeit only some days. Generally a short, stocky people, they were all adept with the track and altitude despite loads up to 20 kg. The easiest was probably for those carrying our packs [mine was 10kg]. Harder and heavier for the food porters. Working for RTC is popular though; wages are relatively higher, and tips add to that. Currently, about 1000 people trek in the Rwenzori annually [that compares with over 40000 annually up Mount Kilimanjaro]. From Kilembe [at about 4000 ft], a few km west of Kasese, we started the long walk into the range through grassland. Being national park, it is entirely remote, except for the camps set up by RTC and the trails established between them. Pretty much undisturbed by people, the ecosystems change with ascending altitude. Near Kilembe in the valley is grassland. Western ascent to the Ranger’s Hut at about 5500 ft was through thick jungle. We heard blue monkeys and saw a few colobus monkeys in the treetops. And this cameleon near the Ranger’s hut. The trail was quite good at this stage. However, these is a steep upward incline; it impacted my breathing, and became the limiting factor for the rest of the trek. The first day was spent passing across various ridges and ravines, jumping across streams, climbing rocks, and traversing log ladders. We spent the night on a high ridge at Sine Huts [at 8400 ft]. Waterfalls created constant background noise from the rivers flowing through the gullies either side of the ridge. Early morning jungle sounds are quite distinct Day 2 the scent continued, but out of jungle and into a thin band of bamboo forest. We then entered the expansive heather region amidst which is Mutinda Camp at 11700 ft. Every day the porters and guides would move ahead and start cooking dinner. So arrival at camp meant sitting down to a cup of tea or hot chocolate. They did a superb job looking after us. We entered the broad region of alpine tundra on day three. December and January form one of the two dry periods in the Rwenzori, when trekking is most popular. We happened to strike some very heavy rains though, which turned any track into thick mud. Thick enough to pull gumboots off or to cause falls at times. Good soft landings though! In order to make headway though, it is necessary to weave step by step on sticks, logs, rocks and squat plants. Ascent to Bugata Hut [13400 ft] took about five hours. There was a great view of the snow covered Weissman’s Peak in the distance. Fatigue and shortness of breath were setting in by then. It was all layers on that evening with the temperature being near to 0 degrees celsius. Early morning the wooden slats and rocks were ice covered. The eastern sunrise was worth recording. \Weismann’s Peak is 14157 ft. With ice and snow cover that day, it was a five hour climb and descent, then a further five hours descent to Kiharo Camp [11250 ft]. I bailed out and was happy to descend to Kiharo Camp that day. Weaving all day, climbing and descending, the day finished with a descent down large rocks in a steep ravine. A highlight was having a small wash using a cup of hot water to wipe down. Day five was a 15 to 20 km exit from the park, largely down through the jungle, but really up and down across ridges and ravines. I developed food poisoning by that stage; it made for a slow descent with patient guides! Naturally enough I was disappointed to not have a crack at Weissman’s Peak, and so achieve one of the holy grails of Rwenzori trekking. However, mountains are more than the climb and view; they speak into a person’s pride nice and bluntly! I loved the remoteness and vastness. That the wilderness exists apart from humans. It was a welcome break from computer centric organising of time, people and tasks. I’m reminded from the Psalm 50:12 - “If I were hungry, I would not tell you, for the world and its fullness are mine”.