Chuck Keiper Trail

MITTELSCHWER 13 Bewertungen
#1 von 10 Wegen in

Chuck Keiper Trail ist ein 29.9 Meilen langer, moderat besuchter Rundweg in der Nähe von Renovo, Pennsylvania. Er führt durch schönen Wald, vorbei an herrlichen Aussichtspunkten und es gibt schöne Wildblumen. Aufgrund der Steigung und Distanz ist die Strecke als moderat einzustufen. Es gibt verschiedene Aktivitätsmöglichkeiten. Die Route ist am besten von März bis Oktober zugänglich. Hunde sind erlaubt, müssen allerdings an der Leine gehalten werden.

Entfernung: 29.9 miles Höhenunterschied: 5,255 feet Routentyp: Rundweg

angeleinte Hunde

Rucksacktour

Camping

Wandern

Naturausflüge

Spazieren

Vogelbeobachtung

Wald

Aussicht

Wildblumen

The trail is named for Charles F. Keiper who was the District Wildlife Conservation Officer for Western Clinton County from 1951 until his death in 1973. Chuck Keiper was a dedicated conservationist and wildlife law enforcement officer.

wandern
2 months ago

Beautiful and we'll maintained. Plenty of water.

2 months ago

Really fun loop. Did it in 3 days, 2 nights. Some maintenance needed but easy to follow.

wandern
käfer
überwachsen
5 months ago

We were able to complete the western loop of the CKT in about a day and ½. We started from the fish damn parking lot and it took us a minute to notice that the trail head for the western loop starts across highway 144. The GPS trail map on AllTrails isn’t accurate in some sections, luckily we had a paper map that accurately depicted the trail. If you hike this trail DO NOT WEAR shorts. The majority of the trial, with exception of Eddy Lick Run Circuit, is overgrown with either stinging nettle, or bramble of some kind. Even though the trail is overgrown it is surprisingly well blazed and provides plenty of places to camp and refill on water. Because of the condition of the trail and how hard it is to navigate in some sections, I would rate this trail as hard and definitely not a beginner friendly hike.

wandern
schlammig
steinig
sturmholz
überwachsen
8 months ago

I have been hiking the same section of this trail my whole life; we are members of a cabin up there that is right along the trail. Finally we got to do the whole thing! Just to clarify, the CKT is 2 loops (East or West) OR 1 big 50 mile loop. We did the continuous 50 mile loop, skipping the connector trail. I highly recommend long pants, go either this time of year or in Fall when the rattlesnakes go back into hiding (saw 1 already), and know that water sources are plentiful, so don't worry about packing too much water as long as you have some means of filtering. Trail is well blazed in ORANGE...don't get misled by the side trails in other colors. Some of them are not labeled as they intersect the CKT. SPOILER ALERT! I am going to go into details on trail conditions and what to expect, so if you like surprises don't read this part. We went counterclockwise from our cabin (De Haas Rd). First section from there isn't bad at all. Some steep downhills, then smooth grassy meadows, then some ups and downs. Campsites were hard to come by about 9-10 miles from the De Haas Rd, so we ended up camping on top of a ridge along the gas line. Day 2 we hiked back down the mountain to Cranberry Bog, where there is a small, but nice site along the creek. Up and over the mountain and then you are in the valley I call "Valley of Many Streams", where you are constantly crossing mountain springs, streams, bogs...it is an easy, relatively flat section and one of my favorites. Just be ready to either get your feet wet or do a lot of rock hopping across. The next valley is totally different. Very rugged, very remote. Beautiful trail, but I'd say 90% of it is sidehill. You are basically walking an overgrown deer path. We saw a bear and it ran away. The stretch along 144 is also sidehill, but not as bad. The sections near civilization are definitely better maintained. Then there is a brutal climb up Drake Hollow that almost made us want to quit. We made it down the the lookout near the intersection of 144 and the connector trail, and actually camped up the trail from there (no fire). Made good use of the porta-pot. In the morning my husband tapped out and got a ride back to the cabin while I hiked on into the Fisher Dam section, back into the West Loop. Saw a turkey and some deer on the ridge above. Then steep hill into the valley. Gorgeous section through there! My favorite! Old growth forest. Rugged, but not too rough of trail. Then I saw a mama bear with 2 cubs. Made noise, powered on. Checked back over my shoulder every now and then. Convinced myself I had put distance from the bears and looked back 1 more time to see giant papa bear. Made more noise, walked faster singing/yelling my head off and clacking my trekking poles. Took out my water to fill up at the creek, glanced around 1 more time to make sure I was out of bear country. Three tiny cubs in a tree with mama bear to my right. Made more noise, jumped across the creek, and yelled and clanked my way out of that valley as fast as my lungs would allow. Steep climb up too! At the top I called in some reinforcements to hike the next wild area with me, and we did. No more bears after that. Burns Run is very dense, very rugged, all sidehill. Tons of blowdowns in Owl Hollow as you come back out of the valley, but THANK YOU to whoever took the time to cut most of them up. You kept that section passable. We continued on into the Yost Loop, camping at the bottom of the valley. Nice campsites at the top in the pines before you head downhill, but once you start that hill you are committed to the bottom where there are 2 overgrown sites. Ironically, the only other hikers we saw on the entire trail ended up at the site that was just within earshot of us. The next day we spotted a couple more sites, but they are a good bit down that stretch. Very overgrown, lots of thistles through there. And of course, mostly up and down on sidehill. Beautiful waterfall at the end, then a nice grassy road back up the hill. Last stretch back to the De Haas after 144 crossing is also a favorite. More rocky stuff here, but not too strenuous, and not too bad of creek crossings. Overall, we had a great trip, though this trail kicked our butts. Probably won't do the entire thing again, but I want to go back and redo some of my favorite sections, maybe actually do the whole hike around cranberry bog and the connector trail.

rucksacktour
Wed Jul 18 2018

We hiked this trail last weekend counter clockwise. Great campsite approx. 7.5 mi. W of parking lot. It's a grueling climb after the trail heads S. on Yost. up to Rt. 144 xing. Lower end of Eddie Lick is quite overgrown with loose shale and steep drop off. Be careful. Plenty of water and campsites, but many portions are in need of maintenance and overgrown. Blazes are missing or too faded. we strayed off trail a few times, lucky we had GPS. Be prepared this is very secluded with no cell service. I would have given 4 stars if not for it's condition.

Camping
Mon Jul 09 2018

I only did the western loop from Fisher fire road to Yost Run and out, and as much as I loved it, would still say it’s more than moderately difficult. Perhaps it was how wet the spring and early summer have been, but the steeper sections of trail were challenging due to uncertain footing and slippery conditions. Still, HIGHLY recommended, but be well prepared.

Wed Aug 09 2017

A nice trail over all, but very unkempt in certain areas. Some nice camp spots as well. Definitely enjoyed this trail.

wandern
Wed Oct 22 2014

This trail is awesome! I grew up in Renovo, but I didn't start hiking it until I moved. Now I live in AK and I try to hike sections of the CKT every time I'm back east.

wandern
2 months ago

wandern
6 months ago

wandern
8 months ago

wandern
Sun Aug 16 2015