Best waterfall trails in Canada

91,533 Reviews
Explore the most popular waterfall trails in Canada with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of waterfall trails in Canada
Top trails (933)
#1 - Lake Agnes Trail
Banff National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(2403)
Length: 4.7 mi • Est. 2 h 51 m
The Lake Agnes Trail is an accessible and relatively short hike up to the Lake Agnes Tea House which was built by the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1901 as a refuge for hikers. The trail has an elevation gain of 1,312 feet and offers fantastic views of the Nokhu Crags and Lake Louise. The Tea House is a real treat while enjoying views of the lake and is open from early June through October. Note that there is no garbage/recycling bin at the tea house as the staff are responsible for trekking supplies up and down the mountain. Please do your part to help the staff and keep our parks clean by being prepared to pack out any garbage from your visit. The trailhead can be accessed from Lake Louise near the Fairmont Chateau Hotel. For those looking for a longer hike check out Little Beehive or Big Beehive.Show more
#2 - Upper Grassi Lakes Trail Loop
Canmore Nordic Centre Provincial Park
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Length: 2.7 mi • Est. 1 h 36 m
Note: During the winter/icy conditions, Grassi Lakes Upper Trail (also known as the "hard" trail) will be closed however the other trails are still accessible. Please check here for more information: https://www.albertaparks.ca/parks/kananaskis/kananaskis-country/advisories-public-safety/trail-reports/canmore-and-area/grassi-lakes-upper/ This popular route takes the easier, gravel Upper Grassi Lakes Trail up and returns on the steeper Grassi Lakes Trail. Feel free to do it in reverse or as an out and back. The Grassi Lakes Trail is located in a Wildlife Corridor. Travel in this area is restricted to designated trails only for the protection of natural habitat, animals, and hikers. Please remain on designated trails at all times. Each member of your hiking group should carry bear spray, as bears are often spotted in this area. Approximately 100m from the trailhead, there is a fork with signage indicating an easier route and one that is more difficult. The easier trail to the right is called Upper Grassi Lakes and follows an old road through dense forest. The more difficult route to the left is the Grassi Lakes Interpretive and climbs gradually through forested terrain before reaching a very steep section with excellent views of a waterfall and the town of Canmore. The loop can be completed in either direction, clockwise or counter-clockwise. The more difficult Grassi Lakes Interpretive Trail is closed in the winter due to icy conditions which develop from water flowing over the trail. The cliffs around the lakes are regularly visited by climbers but should not be closely approached by hikers unless equipped with climbing helmets to protect against serious injury from falling rocks.Show more
#3 - Plain of the Six Glaciers Trail
Banff National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1557)
Length: 9.1 mi • Est. 4 h 58 m
NOTE: This trail is not safe for travel in the winter unless you have avalanche training and equipment. The avalanche zones on both Teahouse trails are clearly marked. See Parks Canada for further information. From the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise, follow the lake shore to the back of the valley. Stop at the teahouse for a cup of tea and watch for mountain goats and glaciers.Show more
#4 - Johnston Canyon to Ink Pots
Banff National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1823)
Length: 7.3 mi • Est. 4 h 17 m
NOTE: As of September 2020, the road leading to the trailhead (Bow Valley Parkway) is still closed due to COVID-19, so you have to access from Hwy 93. You may still park elsewhere and walk/bike to the trailhead. Please check with the park for more information: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/ab/banff/visit/covid-19-info Great views and a really unique walk up to the falls along the canyon on a well kept trail. Be aware that the trail is narrow at times and can be extremely busy. It is best to get here super early as getting a parking spot later in the day is difficult. The ink pots are a great place to eat lunch along the river as the mountains in the background are very scenic.Show more
#5 - Ptarmigan Cirque
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1144)
Length: 2.6 mi • Est. 1 h 2 m
This is a beautiful hike with such little effort required for stunning views. The short distance and incredible views make a great quick hike good for young children. You will likely see lots of wildlife (squirrels, chipmunks, big horn sheep) with nice small waterfalls and great scenery. This is a fragile alpine area and people should respect that and stay on the trail. It is also advisable to carry bear spray. Note: The highway leading up to the hike is closed Dec-June. In winter conditions (that includes early spring and later in fall) this trail is considered backcountry and avalanche hazard exists. Show more
#6 - Grotto Canyon Trail
Bow Valley Provincial Park
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Length: 4.4 mi • Est. 1 h 46 m
This is a great hike with incredible views throughout. It's a good challenge for kids and can be busy on weekends. During the winter you may need snowshoes or crampons since the trail can get icy and slippery. About halfway through, there is a waterfall followed by an Inukshuk Garden and a cave!Show more
#7 - Sarrail Ridge via Rawson Lake Trail
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(983)
Length: 7 mi • Est. 5 h 11 m
Parts of this trail can be closed due to bear activity during the summer months. Please check here for status updates: https://albertaparks.ca/parks/kananaskis/kananaskis-country/advisories-public-safety/trail-reports/peter-lougheed/rawson-lake/ In winter, this trail is considered backcountry and an avalanche hazard exists. Please exercise caution and refer to the park page for more information. Proper footwear and poles recommended. Show more
#8 - Devils Thumb Via Lake Agnes Trail
Banff National Park
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Length: 7.4 mi • Est. 4 h 56 m
The trailhead to Devil's Thumb is located directly across from the trail to the Big Beehive lookout. This trail does not appear on any parks signage, as Parks Canada does not want people who are unprepared to wander onto this difficult trail by accident. You will see a large fallen tree trunk lying across the path where the trail up to Devil's Thumb begins. Make a mental note of the place where the hiking trail ends and the scrambling section begins, as it can be easy to miss on the descent. CAUTION: The latter portion of this trail involves some extremely steep scrambling on loose rocks and dirt, which may not be suitable for beginners. The trail is very narrow and exposed with a steep drop on one side, which may be unnerving for those with fear of heights. Proper hiking shoes with good grip are very strongly recommended. Gloves and hiking poles may also be useful. Mosquitoes are notoriously bad on this trail, particularly on the scrambling section, so bring plenty of bug spray. Avoid this trail in wet weather conditions, as it will become extremely slippery and dangerous. Listen for warnings of falling rocks from other hikers, and warn those below you if you dislodge a rock. Even smaller rocks can cause serious injuries on steep slopes. The trail is often very crowded between Lake Louise and Lake Agnes. The Tea House at Lake Agnes is very busy, but they offer a large range of snacks and drinks. Note that there is no garbage/recycling bin at the tea house as the staff are responsible for trekking supplies up and down the mountain. Please do your part to help the staff and keep our parks clean by being prepared to pack out any garbage from your visit. This trail has incredible views along the way: you can see more than four glaciers at the top! It's well worth it for the views over Lake Agnes, Lake Louise, and the Victoria, Lefroy, Aberdeen, Mitre and Horseshoe Glaciers. Hikers comment that every pit stop along the way has a majestic view!Show more
#9 - Troll Falls
Kananaskis Improvement, Alberta
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1426)
Length: 2.1 mi • Est. 1 h 11 m
This trail is great for families or anybody looking for a nice easy hike. There are two end points: The main one takes you to the bottom of the waterfall whereas the second part takes you above (not directly above the waterfall mentioned above) the waterfall to a creek and some other waterfalls. The second part is more difficult than the first. The main trail is packed down, easy with good hikers and not a lot of elevation. If you want to explore behind the falls bring ice crampons. Exploring the upper trail is neat and you can find a pretty cool ice area that is easier to explore than the falls. Getting to the upper part is a little steep and a little slick but do able with good grips. The trail to the upper falls can be icy!Show more
#10 - Johnston Canyon Trail to Upper Falls
Banff National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1034)
Length: 3.1 mi • Est. 1 h 46 m
Please note: Although this trail is open for recreation, visitors are not allowed to drive or park in the area due to COVID-19 concerns. Hikers must either walk or ride a bike to trailheads. Please check the park page for up to date trail accessibility before visiting: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/ab/banff Additionally, the off-trail cave area for viewing the iconic rock may be CLOSED and roped off depending on the day. With over one million visitors per year Johnston Canyon is one of the most popular tourist attractions in all of Banff National Park. The Lower Falls is very powerful and can be approached via footbridge and pedestrian tunnel, while the Upper Falls is highest and can be taken from a platform at the base or top of the falls. Although the Upper Falls trail is not wheelchair or stroller accessible, the Lower Falls trail is. That trail can be found here: https://www.alltrails.com/trail/canada/alberta/johnston-canyon-trail-to-lower-falls?u=iShow more
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