Best fishing trails in Saskatchewan, Canada

73 Reviews
Explore the most popular fishing trails in Saskatchewan with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of fishing trails in Saskatchewan, Canada
Top trails (17)
#1 - Gem Lakes
Narrow Hills Provincial Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(32)
Length: 3.3 mi • Est. 1 h 34 m
#2 - Lac Des Iles
Meadow Lake Provincial Park, Saskatchewan
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(3)
Length: 14.4 mi
#3 - Trailhead to Northend Campsite
Prince Albert National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(9)
Length: 21.2 mi • Est. 11 h 6 m
At the site, there are two cabins. The main cabin on the shoreline was built in 1931. The upper cabin was built in 1932 for Anahareo, their daughter Shirley Dawn, and visitors. Grey Owl, Anahareo and Shirley Dawn are buried adjacent to the upper cabin in a small graveyard overlooking Ajawaan Lake. The trip to Grey Owl's cabin is much more than a hike. It is a pilgrimage that may bring you closer to Grey Owl's message of conservation. Take some time to reflect on his efforts to reach a society which, year after year, moved further from nature. May your visit to this wilderness sanctuary help your understanding of this man and the message of wilderness preservation. "Remember you belong to Nature, not it to you" Grey OwlShow more
#4 - Melville Reservoir Trail
Cana No. 214, Saskatchewan
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(3)
Length: 1.3 mi • Est. 35 m
The Melville Reservoir trail is 1.7 km loop that starts at the trail head located on the south side on the spillway at the mouth of the Crescent Creek. The trail then cuts across an open meadow following the tree line for 300m. When you reach the fork in the trail, if you go to the right you will continue across the meadow to the edge of the creek and into the poplar Forrest until you cross the creek. The trail then cuts back along the creek on the east bank toward the trail head. This part of the trail has good tree cover long the fence line which marks the park boundary and has some great views of the local countryside. Show more
#5 - Hanging Heart Lake to Crean Lake
Prince Albert National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(2)
Length: 12.4 mi
The launch area is very busy here. These lakes are well fished by many people from near and far. It is located just before the Kingsmere Road and has a huge parking area. The Hanging Heart Lake (3) are connected by small channels and those areas were shallow but with stunning water flora and the scenery along the banks was equally beautiful. The final channel leads to the massive Crean Lake. Crean Lake is huge and has many islands within.Show more
#6 - Pepaw Lake
Pepaw Lake Recreation Site, Saskatchewan
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1)
Length: 4.6 mi
#7 - Mustus Lakes First, Second, and Third
Meadow Lake Provincial Park, Saskatchewan
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(2)
Length: 10.0 mi
August adventure with hot temperatures but modest wind until the last 4-5 Kms where I was paddling against waves . The approach to second Mustus is well maintained, launch area and a small dock also maintained. Paddling from second to first Mustus there were lots of bulrush/cattail masses but managed to weave around, scooch the kayak over and enter the opening of first Mustus. It’s a very boggy lake at the opening with tons of lily pads and other water flora on the surface. This lake is large, instead of doing the perimeter I went back through the tiny channels, paddled through second and made my way to paddle all around the third. Third Mustus was my favourite. There were tiny beach areas or deadfall where I could pull my kayak into or hang onto and take a break. The channel leading from second to third is wide but shallow. Lots of beaver houses, debris, and I could see the sandy bottom clearly. Today was a very serene paddle. Solitude throughout each lake except for ducks and their ducklings, pelicans, loons and the odd fish jumping. I heard a lot of crackling on some shorelines assuming the deer coming down from the hills for water. The hills on the one shoreline were covered in wildflowers. These are very pretty lakes. Highly recommend.Show more
#8 - Wynyard Regional Park Loop
Wynyard, Saskatchewan
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarGray Star(3)
Length: 1.8 mi • Est. 51 m
#9 - Suffern Lake Sand Dunes Trail
Senlac, Saskatchewan
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray Star(1)
Length: 1.0 mi • Est. 23 m
Suffern Lake Sand Dunes trail is located on the South side of Suffern Lake inside the Suffern Lake Regional Park. This trail is just under 2 km long and features Sand Dunes over 60 feet tall at the midway point of the trail. Depending which way you start the trail you will also come across a lookout spot on the South West shore of the lake that provides an amazing view of Suffern Lake and the main Campground area. It is strongly recommended to stay on the trail in this area as it is home to main Escobaria Vivipara or more commonly known as the Beehive Cactus. Remember to pack water as well as it can get quite hot on a sunny day on the Sand Dunes. On the Suffern Lake Sandunes Trail there is a Bathroom, Bench and Campsites with potable water located along the South West Shore of Suffern Lake. Suffern Lake is stocked with Brown Trout and Rainbow Trout. Near the lookout point on the South West shore there is a small trail that leads to the waters edge where you can enjoy some shore fishing. Suffern Lake Regional Park is also home to Papilio glaucus or commonly known as the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly which is abundantly found in North America East of the Rocky Mountains. The lifespan of the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly stretches from spring through fall, all through which they produce two or three broods. These butterflies only live for about a month.Show more
#10 - Red Deer Trail: Yellow Loop
Prince Albert National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray Star(5)
Length: 3.6 mi • Est. 1 h 26 m
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