Best paved trails in Canada

16,158 Reviews
Explore the most popular paved trails in Canada with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of paved trails in Canada
Top trails (253)
#1 - Moraine Lake Rockpile Trail
Banff National Park
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Length: 0.5 mi • Est. 13 m
Note: At certain times of the year, access to Moraine Lake trails may be managed to protect visitors and to minimize disturbance to bears. Please check with Banff National Park before proceeding. This trail is popular and is heavily trafficked. Arrive early for parking and for viewing the lake. Due to multiple areas of steep grades over 12% and staircases, this trail has not been marked wheelchair or stroller-friendly, although some parts may be accessible for some users.Show more
#2 - Johnston Canyon Trail to Upper Falls
Banff National Park
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Length: 3.1 mi • Est. 1 h 46 m
Please note: Although this trail is open for recreation, visitors are not allowed to drive or park in the area due to COVID-19 concerns. Hikers must either walk or ride a bike to trailheads. Please check the park page for up to date trail accessibility before visiting: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/ab/banff Additionally, the off-trail cave area for viewing the iconic rock may be CLOSED and roped off depending on the day. With over one million visitors per year Johnston Canyon is one of the most popular tourist attractions in all of Banff National Park. The Lower Falls is very powerful and can be approached via footbridge and pedestrian tunnel, while the Upper Falls is highest and can be taken from a platform at the base or top of the falls. Although the Upper Falls trail is not wheelchair or stroller accessible, the Lower Falls trail is. That trail can be found here: https://www.alltrails.com/trail/canada/alberta/johnston-canyon-trail-to-lower-falls?u=iShow more
#3 - Johnston Canyon Trail to Lower Falls
Banff National Park
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Length: 1.4 mi • Est. 34 m
As of August 2020, the road to the trailhead is closed. Please check with the park before visiting. Johnston Canyon is a gorgeous canyon hike with beautiful scenery. The drive from the town of Banff to the trailhead takes around 30 minutes. The trail begins along a paved pathway on a slight incline through the forest alongside the deep canyon. The scenery is absolutely gorgeous and there are plenty of amazing photo opportunities. There are some sections of the trail which follow along sturdy but narrow metal catwalks attached to the rock cliffs on the side of the canyon, which is fun. At the 1.2 km mark, you arrive at the Lower Falls. There is a wooden bridge which crosses the canyon and river underneath from the main trail leading to a small cave in the rocks on the other side. The tunnel through the cave is narrow and dark to walk through but at the end, there is an opening which is directly in front of the powerful waterfall and provides a unique vantage point. Be prepared to get wet! The Lower Falls are so beautiful and there are fantastic views from along the bridge and from the main trail as well. The trail becomes slightly more difficult between the Lower and Upper Falls, as it climbs more steadily along a moderate incline and continues through the forest and along catwalks, but is still completely manageable and should not be challenging for someone of average fitness. There are lots of small waterfalls to see in the canyon on this portion of the hike and many great viewpoints overlooking the canyon. Shortly before reaching the Upper Falls, there is a well beaten but unmarked pathway stemming off from the main trail which you can follow as it leads down a steep hill and into the bottom of the rocky canyon. There is a massive cave with stunning views of a very strange and uniquely shaped large rock in the canyon with a waterfall flowing on one side of it and a variety of lush mosses and trees growing on top of it. If you have time, we recommend stopping here. At 2.4 km from the trailhead, you come to the Upper Falls. The falls aren't visible from the main trail but a metal catwalk leads over the canyon and ends at a small platform near the base of these gorgeous tall waterfalls as they fall over the edge of a cliff. You can continue along the main trail past the Upper Falls on a short and steep climb to another viewpoint at the top of the waterfalls, which provides a unique perspective overlooking the gorge and the falls. The landscape is so beautiful from this area! From this point, you can continue hiking another 3 km to the Ink Pots which makes for a full half-day hike and are amazing to see though this portion of the trail can be very crowded. Johnston Canyon gets incredibly crowded during the summer months and is one of the busiest hikes in the Banff area. Get there early in the morning in order to beat the crowds and enjoy a more peaceful and relaxed atmosphere. Even though it is extremely popular, this hike is definitely a must-visit and both the Lower and Upper Falls are worth seeing. Remember to bring a camera to capture the amazing scenery and take advantage of the many wonderful photo opportunities, as well as water and snacks. There are modern washrooms in the parking lot at the beginning of the trail and wooden benches along the pathway to stop. It should take between 1.5 and 2 hours to complete the hike to and from the Upper Falls. Accessibility: The trail to the Lower Falls is paved and mostly flat with an estimated average grade of 4%. It is typically at least two feet wide. The steepest areas are between 0.3 and 0.4 miles where the grade is greater than 12% so this trail may not be fully accessible for wheelchair/mobility equipment and stroller users due to the steep portion or narrowness of the trail.Show more
#4 - Athabasca Falls
Jasper National Park
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Length: 0.5 mi • Est. 16 m
Athabasca Falls is located approximately 30 minutes south of the town of Jasper along the scenic Icefields Parkway. It is a place definitely worth stopping and exploring. The waterfalls are gorgeous and you can explore the canyon too. There is a network of paved pathways leading to various areas overlooking the waterfalls and viewpoints of the deep and narrow canyon. There are a network of paved pathways leading to various areas overlooking the waterfalls and viewpoints of the deep and narrow canyon. Athabasca Falls is a powerful and gorgeous waterfall with a stunning backdrop of forests, mountains and the river flowing through as huge volumes of water rushed down into the canyon. There are a few lookout points offering different views of the falls along the trails. The area can be quite crowded with some of the lookout areas being very small, so you may have to wait your turn in order to get up front and take photos. The pathways are interesting to explore and one of them leads through a narrow section between two walls of the canyon with stairs carved into the rocks. There are some great vantage points overlooking the river and the canyon to see where the water had eroded the rock to create caves and unique rock formations over many years. Athabasca Falls is a wonderful area to discover, admire the natural beauty and take plenty of photos. The parking lot is large and can accommodate quite a few vehicles. It would probably be best to visit in the morning during the summer season before the crowds of people show up. If you’re driving the Icefields Parkway, definitely stop here.Show more
#5 - Takakkaw Falls Trail
Yoho National Park
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Length: 0.8 mi • Est. 20 m
Note: The road leading to this trailhead closes seasonally. For more information, please see https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/bc/yoho These are some of the highest waterfalls in Canada with beautiful Yoho hiking around them. Accessibility: Although this trail is paved and typically over four feet wide, there are a couple of steep sections of this trail that have a grade greater than 8% such as near the bridge. Assistance may be required for wheelchair/mobility equipment or stroller users at these points. The estimated max grade is 12% at about 0.3 - 0.4 miles. The estimated average grade for the trail is 5%.Show more
#6 - Sixteen Mile Creek Trail Loop
Lions Valley Park
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Length: 3.8 mi • Est. 1 h 44 m
NOTE: As of August 15, 2020, users have reported that the end of the trail is CLOSED, so you must finish by taking Dundas back down to the lot.Show more
#7 - Stanley Park Seawall Trail
Stanley Park
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Length: 5.8 mi • Est. 2 h 29 m
Parts of the sea wall have been reported closed due to restoration work (November 2020). As Vancouver's largest and most famous, historic park, Stanley Park is extremely popular with both locals and tourists all year around. The heavily trafficked Seawall Loop Trail that surrounds the park hugs the perimeter shoreline and offers beautiful views from beginning to end. This trail is open 365 days a year which brings us to what is perhaps its only drawback. When temperatures reach freezing, the paved path can accumulate very slippery black ice, so extra caution is required. A park conditions search is highly recommended during the winter months.  Accessibility: The trail is smoothly paved all around with two separate side-by-side paths - the beachside for foot traffic and the inner one for bikes and rollerblades. Despite being so busy, the footpath is typically at least four feet wide and there is usually enough room to pass when needed. The grade is mostly gentle (most of the trail estimated at 5% or less), but there is a steep section by Siwash Rock after 2.3 miles with a grade about 15%. The restrooms by Stanley's Bar and Grill and by Third Beach are wheelchair accessible. Water wheelchairs are available for free loan on a first-come-first-served basis at the Second Beach Pool between noon and 8 PM. Reservations for water wheelchairs can be made by calling at least 24 hours in advance.Show more
#8 - Marble Canyon
Kootenay National Park
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Length: 0.9 mi • Est. 29 m
The prettiest little pull-off for an up close, quick peek of the glacier blue water. Very well established trail. Not too crowded. Perfect pit stop on the way to Banff.Show more
#9 - Goat Island Scenic Walk
Niagara Falls State Park
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Length: 2.3 mi • Est. 56 m
Goat Island features several family-friendly and accessible paved trails around the island, as well as bridge access to sites such as Luna Island where you can see the American Falls and Bridal Falls close up. On the other side of the Island, Terrapin Point and Horseshoe Falls also have great views. The Rainbow Bridge can be used to cross over into Canada and see the Falls from a different angle. There is a $5 fee to park. In the winter, weather at Niagara Falls transforms the Park into an icy wonderland. Many Park attractions close for the season, but visitors can always see awe-inspiring Niagara Falls flow to the river below as it freezes and a thick layer of ice covers every surface. During winter, some of the trails closer to the water get icy and are closed. Accessibility: These trails are paved and typically at least three feet wide. There are a few steep sections where the grade is between 8% and 12% (such as on the trail to Three Sisters Islands and when rounding the corner at Terrapin Point) but the estimated average trail grade is 6%. Wheelchair/mobility equipment and stroller users may need assistance in the steep sections or need to avoid them. Parking, bathrooms, and picnic tables at Goat Point are newly ADA-compliant.Show more
#10 - Pier 4 Park Trail
Hamilton, Ontario
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Length: 1.5 mi • Est. 38 m
Nice, easy, paved, stroll along the harbor. Accessibility: The trail surface is paved, smooth, and it is typically at least five feet wide. It is flat with an estimated average grade of 1% and a max grade of 2%. Most wheelchair/mobility equipment and stroller users will likely find this trail navigable.Show more
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