Best partially paved trails in Canada

22,695 Reviews
Explore the most popular partially paved trails in Canada with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of partially paved trails in Canada
Top trails (337)
#1 - Moraine Lake Shoreline Trail
Banff National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(448)
Length: 1.6 mi • Est. 38 m
This family-friendly trail features gorgeous views of the bright blue water of Moraine Lake and snowcapped mountain peaks all around. Canoes can be rented for use on the lake. The best time to visit is in July or August because snow and ice can remain on the lake and trail through May or early June. Seasonal closures and restrictions apply to this trail. Please check ahead before setting out for the hike. There is a parking lot with 150 spots but it fills up early. There is also an option to use a free shuttle that runs every fifteen minutes from Lake Louise Overflow car park between 8 AM and 4:15 PM from mid-September to mid-October. There are bathrooms by the parking lot as well as a cafe that is open seasonally. Another shuttle runs from Banff but has a cost of $10. Bears are common in this area so carrying bear spray and hiking in tight groups is suggested. This trail is not considered stroller or wheelchair friendly due to multiple steep sections above a 12% grade. This trail is partially boardwalk and partially packed dirt. It it typically at least two feet wide. Most of the trail has a grade less than 5% but the steepest sections have up to a 15% grade and are at about 0.3 miles and 0.7 miles. This trail may be doable for wheelchair and stroller users with assistance. Show more
#2 - Lake Louise Lakefront Trail
Banff National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(719)
Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 23 m
Simple but busy walk along the lakeshore with beautiful views along Lake Louise to the Plain of Six Glaciers Trail. Accessibility: This trail is partially-paved/partially-dirt and typically at least three feet wide. It has some steep sections, with an estimated average grade of 5% and max grade above 10% at about 0.7 miles and 1.2 miles. Wheelchair and stroller users may require assistance. There are several handicapped-accessible parking spots in the parking lot and accessible bathrooms close to the trailhead. Past the lake the grade increases. Use caution in the winter as the trail may be snowy or icy. The dirt portion of the trail may also get muddy.Show more
#3 - Buntzen Lake Trail
Buntzen Lake Reservoir Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(857)
Length: 7.5 mi • Est. 3 h 4 m
As of June 2020, Buntzen Lake Trails have reopened. Some trails are only open one-way and others allow only a limited amount of visitors. Please be mindful of social distancing. Dog friendly trail with some nice lake views. A bit of loose rock on the west side of the lake heading back. Note that the front gates close at 7:30pm.Show more
#4 - Emerald Lake Trail
Yoho National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(466)
Length: 6.7 mi • Est. 3 h 31 m
Think Lake Louise without the crowds and with better chances of seeing North American wildlife. This trail is the Rockies at its best. It combines a circuit of a green glacial lake surrounded by mountains, with a diversion to Emerald Basin through forests and avalanche chutes to see the glacier that created it all. In the warmer months, you can add canoeing to the activity list. The hiking will be more limited in winter, but you have skating, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing options to make up for it. The trail is rated as moderate because of some steep sections in the climb to Emerald Basin, but you can just stick to the lake circuit if you want an easier level stroll. The hike to the basin is rewarding not just for the views - it also gets you up close with friendly colonies of ground squirrels and marmots. It is popular by Yoho standards, but you are not going to get the pedestrian traffic jams of nearby Lake Louise or Banff. The good news is that even on busy summer days, most Emerald Lake visitors don't venture too far from the car park at the start of the trail to capture their photo opportunity. And once you are off the lake circuit, the basin trail feels like true wilderness.Show more
#5 - Lake Agnes Trail to Plain of Six Glaciers Trail Loop
Banff National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(466)
Length: 8.8 mi • Est. 4 h 32 m
PLEASE NOTE: Trail is rated from moderate to low difficult depending on your hiking level. The trail is often very crowded between Lake Louise and Lake Agnes. The tea house at Lake Agnes is very busy, but they offer a large range of snacks and drinks. Note that there is no garbage/recycling bin at the tea house as the staff are responsible for trekking supplies up and down the mountain. Please do your part to help the staff and keep our parks clean by being prepared to pack out any garbage from your visit. Show more
#6 - Wild Pacific Trail: Lighthouse Loop
Ucluelet, British Columbia
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(534)
Length: 1.6 mi • Est. 46 m
As of June 2020, this park runs one-way due to COVID 19. This easy coastal path is great walk around the coastal headlands. There are views of the Barkley Sound, Amphitrite Lighthouse, Inspiration Point, and He-Tin-Kis Beach. There are no stairs on this route and motorized wheelchairs may be able to navigate the path (there is a paved pathway to the lighthouse only). Check with Ucluelet's Wild Pacific Trail.Show more
#7 - Carbide Willson Ruins and Meech Lake Falls
Parc de la Gatineau
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(434)
Length: 2.7 mi • Est. 1 h 28 m
Note: As of July 06, 2020, users have reported that the foot bridge at ruins is closed for repair but with low water you can cross over rocks above or below falls. Do NOT try to walk/hike this trail in the winter. The trail is for Cross Country Skiing only in the winter and tickets are given. Show more
#8 - Tour du Mont Albert
Gaspésie National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(175)
Length: 12.7 mi • Est. 7 h 33 m
The climb into the forest is long but you are rewarded at the top with a great view and a beautiful tundra landscape. The descent along a stream is also very beautiful, but very rocky. The territory is home to the Chic-Chocs wildlife reserve and the Gaspésie national park. Mont Albert, which rises to 1,151 meters (3,776 ft), is the 9 th highest peak in Quebec. It was named in honor of Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha because geologist Alexander Murray made the first recorded ascent of the mountain on the prince's birthday, August 26, 1845. This mountain enjoys of a unique ecology for its latitude: month of the year and vegetation of the alpine tundra. The territory is also home to migrating woodland caribou, the only remaining herd south of the St. Lawrence. We recommend that you park near the Discovery and Visitors Center.Show more
#9 - Glenmore Reservoir Trail
South Glenmore Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(593)
Length: 9.5 mi • Est. 3 h 50 m
Please note: As of July 20,2020 the section of the trail by the golf course along the reservoir has been reported temporarily closed, but there is an easy detour. Show more
#10 - Sundance Canyon Trail
Banff National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(402)
Length: 5.6 mi • Est. 2 h 15 m
Well-marked trail leaving from Cave and Basin on a long road that follows the Bow River. At the end of the road, bikes are no longer permitted, and the trail winds up and across waterfalls in the canyon, giving views of the Massive Range, Mount Cory and Mount Louis.Show more
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