Best dogs trails in Canada

57,247 Reviews
Explore the most popular dog friendly trails in Canada with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of dogs trails in Canada
Top trails (1059)
#1 - Tunnel Mountain Trail
Banff National Park
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Length: 2.8 mi • Est. 1 h 43 m
The Tunnel Mountain trail is a short hike to an amazing viewpoint on top of the mountain overlooking the town of Banff and surrounding scenery. The trail begins from Tunnel Mountain Drive in Banff. It follows along long, nicely graded switchbacks along the side of the mountain through the forest. Some of the switchbacks are steeper than others and some of them level out which provides a chance to catch your breath. There are some glimpses of the views along the way through the trees. The best views can be seen from the top of the mountain at the end of the trail. There are some bare rocks surrounded by forest which are perfect places to sit and admire the views overlooking Banff and the surrounding mountains and valleys. It is beautiful! Would recommend this short hike for a good leg workout and opportunity to see great views.Show more
#2 - Ptarmigan Cirque
Peter Lougheed Provincial Park
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Length: 2.6 mi • Est. 1 h 2 m
This is a beautiful hike with such little effort required for stunning views. The short distance and incredible views make a great quick hike good for young children. You will likely see lots of wildlife (squirrels, chipmunks, big horn sheep) with nice small waterfalls and great scenery. This is a fragile alpine area and people should respect that and stay on the trail. It is also advisable to carry bear spray. Note: The highway leading up to the hike is closed Dec-June. In winter conditions (that includes early spring and later in fall) this trail is considered backcountry and avalanche hazard exists. Show more
#3 - Mount Seymour Trail
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
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Length: 5.1 mi • Est. 3 h 20 m
On a clear day this 8 km round trip trail offers hikers stunning views of the lower mainland and the surrounding mountains. The trail traverses three peaks ending at Mount Seymour Summit which offers a spectacular panoramic view of the area. This is a great day hike for those looking for something well marked but less touristy than the Grouse Grind or Lynn Canyon Park. The trail starts at the Mount Seymour Ski area at the last parking lot from the entrance. Keep driving to the end where there is a map at the trail head. During the summer parking is $3 that can be paid with a credit card or change. At the trail head make sure to read the notices for the conditions off the trails because parts of the trail can remain snow covered into August. From the trail head you will see a number of signs to the various trails. The best path to start the hike forks left off the main road. The trail steady inclines to Brockton point revealing the first of many spectacular views of Vancouver. The path continues upward steadily until the trail forks to Elsay Lake, make sure to follow the trail left as the Elsay Lake trail is much more challenging. Here the path winds through the rocks to First Pump Peak and is well marked, just make sure to look for the orange markers at each turn. Many decide to turn back after first peak but those who continue to Mount Seymour peak get a much better view of the mountains to the north. Second pump peak is clearly visible from the first peak and the trail is easy to navigate. The trail between the second peak and Mount Seymour Peak is the most difficult part of the hike as the trail cuts down northwest side of second peak. If covered in snow in snow or ice it may not be possible to pass without proper equipment. After scrambling up the southwest side of the third peak hikers are rewarded with a spectacular view of the area. Taking some time to absorb the view then follow the same trail back to the parking lot.Show more
#4 - Norvan Falls
Lynn Headwaters Regional Park
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Length: 8.7 mi • Est. 3 h 31 m
Hike is accessible year round but you will need crampons in the winter. Please note that bears have been sighted on this trail.Show more
#5 - Canyon Creek Ice Cave Trail
Elbow River Provincial Recreation Area
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Length: 8.1 mi • Est. 4 h 15 m
The 7 km gated access road is located on the north end of the Canyon Creek parking lot down Canyon Creek Road. This parking area is signed "Ing's Mine" along Hwy 66. The trail head is located on the access road after a fork in the road, and before the helicopter landing area.Show more
#6 - Heart Creek Trail
Heart Creek Provincial Recreation Area
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Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 50 m
Short and easy hike to a popular climbing area. Tons of sport climbing and bouldering.Show more
#7 - Crystal Falls
Coquitlam River Park
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Length: 3.8 mi • Est. 1 h 46 m
Located east of Vancouver in Coquitlam, Crystal Falls is a scenic waterfall that drains into the Coquitlam River and is along a short, easy trail. The area is also popular with dog walkers and mountain bikers and the route can be very muddy for several months of the year. From the unmarked trailhead on Karley Crescent, walk into the forest, down the short slope, and along the path as it runs parallel to the Upper Coquitlam River. The trail dips down to the edge of the river before climbing back uphill and continue northward to the falls. Continue walking as the route weaves its way along the shore and through the scenic, moss covered forest. After about 40 minutes, there is an old blue pickup truck abandoned on your left. From here, it's about another 15 minutes up the trail, crossing several more small streams, and finally arriving at a larger creek where Crystal Falls sits just a few meters further upstream. The area can be quite busy during the warmer weather months, so choose a place to sit and enjoy a snack while taking in the sights and sounds of the waterfall. Once you're ready to head back, walk down the trail, crossing the small streams, past the old pickup truck, and eventually out to the neighbourhood where you started your hike.Show more
#8 - Quarry Rock via Baden Powell from Deep Cove
Deep Cove
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Length: 2.3 mi • Est. 1 h 21 m
There are many very popular, well known trails in the parks stretching across the North Shore and this section of the Baden Powell to the Quarry Rock Lookout is consistently one of the most heavily trafficked of them all. Regardless of the season or even the weather, this trail is always extremely busy and you will almost be certain to meet with a large group of fellow hikers at the lookout at the end. The hike begins at the Baden Powell trailhead in Deep Cove and winds it way through Cove Forest. These woodlands are green with lichens and home to many heritage trees, some over 600 years old. The trail also crosses six, often rushing creeks with bridges over each. Despite the park signs noting moderate difficulty, the out and back length of 4km and elevation high point of 120 metres make this a relatively easy trail. The Quarry Rock Lookout is quite impressive considering it sits at an elevation of only 80 metres and on a clear day, it offers beautiful views of Indian Arm. However, due to the crowds, it can be quite challenging to take pictures while excluding people, a dilemma that also extends to pictures on the trail as well. To compensate for so many visitors, the trail has been upgraded with several long boardwalks, handrails, and staircases up and down almost every incline. Casual hikers will probably appreciate this structured safety but experienced hikers may actually prefer more of a natural, unaltered path. If you choose this hike on the weekend or even a sunny weekday, you may find convenient parking to be an issue. There is a relatively large lot near the trailhead but as it serves the parks and beaches in Deep Cove as well, it will often be full. If you prefer to avoid this obstacle, another option is to simply take a different trail to Quarry Rock. Alternative hikes begin from both Indian River Drive and Mount Seymour Road and both will usually have parking available at their respective trailheads.Show more
#9 - The Crack Trail
Killarney Provincial Park
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Length: 4.4 mi • Est. 1 h 47 m
NOTE: The last section of this trail is rated difficult, hikers will have to climb rocks and scrambles making it hard for dogs to complete. Parking Fee: $14 A good trail with unbelievable viewpoints from the top in Killarney, Ontario, Canada. From the parking area follow the red sign and after 1 km you will find the blue sign which navigates you to the top of the Crack. In first 1.5 km it runs through the woods and it is very buggy.Show more
#10 - Mount Lipsett
Elbow-Sheep Wildland Provincial Park
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Length: 8.2 mi • Est. 4 h 51 m
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