Best cave trails in Canada

13,365 Reviews
Explore the most popular cave trails in Canada with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of cave trails in Canada
Top trails (103)
#1 - Johnston Canyon to Ink Pots
Banff National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1823)
Length: 7.3 mi • Est. 4 h 17 m
NOTE: As of September 2020, the road leading to the trailhead (Bow Valley Parkway) is still closed due to COVID-19, so you have to access from Hwy 93. You may still park elsewhere and walk/bike to the trailhead. Please check with the park for more information: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/ab/banff/visit/covid-19-info Great views and a really unique walk up to the falls along the canyon on a well kept trail. Be aware that the trail is narrow at times and can be extremely busy. It is best to get here super early as getting a parking spot later in the day is difficult. The ink pots are a great place to eat lunch along the river as the mountains in the background are very scenic.Show more
#2 - Grotto Canyon Trail
Bow Valley Provincial Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(1785)
Length: 4.4 mi • Est. 1 h 46 m
This is a great hike with incredible views throughout. It's a good challenge for kids and can be busy on weekends. During the winter you may need snowshoes or crampons since the trail can get icy and slippery. About halfway through, there is a waterfall followed by an Inukshuk Garden and a cave!Show more
#3 - Heart Mountain Horseshoe Trail
Bow Valley Provincial Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(791)
Length: 7.3 mi • Est. 4 h 40 m
The first part is very well marked and you are going straight up hill till you hit the boulder wall section. Then you hit a larger wall section to climb up, use caution it’s steep but well marked and just use common sense lots of places to grab onto and place your feet. Once up that you eventually summit the mountain with beautiful views then you continue the loop it’s fairly long but great views all around. This is not your regular hike, this involves scrambling and little rock climbing. It can also get really windy at times. This is not a hike for beginners. This trail passes by 3 different peaks, including: Heart Mountain, Grant McEwan Peak, and a smaller unnamed peak. While dogs are allowed on leash, users have reported this trail is not suitable for dogs.Show more
#4 - Crypt Lake Trail
Waterton Lakes National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(673)
Length: 12.7 mi • Est. 7 h 7 m
PLEASE NOTE: You will need to board a ferry to take you to and from the trailhead. Tickets for the ferry are available at the marina. Seating on the ferries is limited and may sell out, so it is best to arrive early to purchase your ticket. Pay close attention to the pick-up times for your return to town after your hike. After the last scheduled pick-up of the day, there will be no more ferries coming until the following morning. The ferry is also subject to closures. For rates and additional information, visit https://www.watertoncruise.com/ It is important that each member of your hiking group is carrying bear spray, as bears are regularly spotted on this trail. The cable has some very small frayed sections, so be careful not to cut your hands. This hike does involve touching the cables and ladder so please bring hand-sanitizer for use on this trail. This hike is a great opportunity to get a good workout and see some beautiful and diverse nature. The first part of the hike goes through a forest and is shaded. The first set of climbs are easy and then the trail levels out. Somewhere around the second waterfall, the hike starts climbing and it is completely exposed, be sure to have water, sunscreen, a hat etc. for this part of the hike. Then comes the ledge, the tunnel and the cables. The ledge has enough space to walk comfortably on both sides. Unless you are very terrified of heights you will likely not find this part of the hike too scary! The tunnel is narrow but fairly short, and the lake is just a small walk away after this. The route on this map sends you back via the Hell Roaring Falls Trail. This trail can be overgrown and is much less travelled. If you want to get away from the crowds it is a great option, but you can also do the hike as an out and back. Show more
#5 - Berg Lake, Kinney Lake, Emperor Falls
Mount Robson Provincial Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(457)
Length: 25.8 mi • Est. Multi-day
Note: Dogs are NOT allowed OVERNIGHT. The registration for the over night stays is at the back of the closed (as of June 2020) visitor centre. WiFi is still available at the entrance door. Along the way you will pass by Kinney Lake, Whitehorn and the Valley of a Thousand Falls, and Emperor Falls. On the trail you will see 16 glaciers. This is one of the top trails in Canada. Comfortable boots and hiking poles highly recommended.Show more
#6 - Canyon Creek Ice Cave Trail
Elbow River Provincial Recreation Area
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(572)
Length: 8.1 mi • Est. 4 h 15 m
The 7 km gated access road is located on the north end of the Canyon Creek parking lot down Canyon Creek Road. This parking area is signed "Ing's Mine" along Hwy 66. The trail head is located on the access road after a fork in the road, and before the helicopter landing area.Show more
#7 - Hunt Lake Trail
Whiteshell Provincial Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(710)
Length: 7.8 mi • Est. 2 h 57 m
The terrain is pretty rugged as the winding trail follows alongside the shore of West Hawk Lake, passing through forested areas (some overgrown areas with a narrow path through the bush), involving steep climbs and descents on rock walls and has lots of roots and rocks on the path. The rocks are slippery in some areas so watch where you’re stepping. There are amazing scenic views of the lake along the way with some great swimming spots to take a refreshing dip. Close to the beginning of the trail, there is a really cool cave in a vertical rock wall with trees growing through the rocks that makes for great photos. The trail is mostly shaded but there were some areas in full sun. The trail ends at a quiet cove on West Hawk Lake with flat rocks for sitting and a shelter and fire pit at the 6 km mark. It is an awesome place for swimming, relaxing and enjoying lunch. The atmosphere is so peaceful! There are beautiful panoramic views of the stunning natural beauty. The trail is well marked and maintained for the most part. There are some downed trees across the path. It is fairly easy to see where the path is leading though on the way to the end point. There are blue arrows posted on trees and colourful flagging tape to guide the way. On the way back, there are some areas where it can become confusing to know which way the trail led, as there are multiple well worn paths. If you find out you have taken the wrong path, just backtrack and find a sign or try another way. A good tip: when in doubt, climb up! There could be better signage on the way back as most of the signs are facing the opposite direction. Consider wearing hiking boots with ankle support, not runners and definitely not flip flops. It’s very easy to misstep and lose your footing on the rocks. Bring a swimsuit and quick dry towel for swimming at the various spots along the way and at the end of the trail. Make sure to bring sufficient water and food - at least 2 litres of water is recommended. The length of time will depend on your fitness level and how long you want to stop for breaks, but 3-6 hours is a good estimated range. Show more
#8 - Old Goat Glacier Trail
Spray Valley Provincial Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(378)
Length: 7 mi • Est. 3 h 49 m
A true gem in Kananaskis Country! The Old Goat Glacier offers opportunities to take great photos of forest floors with lots of greens and moving water. You also get a chance to see and feel a real glacier. There are reports that this trail can be blocked off for use by the sled dog tour companies. It may be best to check their schedule before heading to the trail.Show more
#9 - Duncan Caves Trail
Duncan Escarpment Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(320)
Length: 7.7 mi • Est. 4 h 6 m
Note: portions of this trail are reportedly closed certain times of the year. Due to seasonal extremes in temperature and the forces of gravity, large blocks of rock have broken away from the main face of the Niagara Escarpment. The gradual shifting downwards of these huge blocks has produced the crevice caves of the Collingwood-Blue Mountain area. The park's range of microclimates supports interesting cliff face vegetation communities.Show more
#10 - Jura Creek Trail
Bow Valley Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(438)
Length: 4.3 mi • Est. 2 h 24 m
The highlights of the creek is the narrow canyon to explore with rock formations and various cascading pools.Show more
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