Best trails in Edmonton, Alberta

4,639 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Edmonton, Alberta? AllTrails has 94 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Elk Island National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Chickakoo Regional Park or Whitemud Ravine Nature Reserve. Just looking to take a quick stroll? We've got 67 easy trails in Edmonton ranging from 0.6 to 12.8 miles and from 2,034 to 2,408 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Edmonton, Alberta
Top trails (94)
#1 - Mill Creek Ravine Trail to North Saskatchewan River
Edmonton, Alberta
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(224)
Length: 6.6 mi • Est. 3 h 4 m
Mill Creek Raven trail is approx. 3.3 miles (5.3k) and has both paved and unpaved surfaces. Part of the River Valley trail system Mill Creek Raven trail connects to Nellie McClung Park and the Henrietta Muir Edwards Park trails providing access to more miles of trails along the N. Saskatchewan River. After the initial 3.3 miles of the Mill Creek Ravine Trail, you will continue onto connecting trails to access the riverfront. There are many interconnecting trails to choose from.Show more
#2 - Whitemud Creek Trail
Whitemud Ravine Nature Reserve
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(211)
Length: 4.2 mi • Est. 1 h 42 m
Note: As of September 2020, users have reported closures along this route. Please check here for updates and more information: https://www.edmonton.ca/activities_parks_recreation/parks_rivervalley/trailpark-cautions-closures.aspxShow more
#3 - Mactaggart Sanctuary Path
Magrath Heights Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(233)
Length: 1.4 mi • Est. 39 m
Please note that though this trail is short and has very little elevation gain, that it can be quite rugged. There are many portions that can be muddy and rocky.Show more
#4 - North Saskatchewan River Loop Trail
Edmonton, Alberta
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(164)
Length: 3.2 mi • Est. 1 h 29 m
As of April 2020, part of the trail on the south side of the river is closed. Hikers may travel up to Saskatchewan Dr. and over. Great walking, cycling trailShow more
#5 - William Hawrelak Park Riverside Walk
William Hawrelak Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(191)
Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 9 m
Hawrelak Park is one of Edmonton's busiest parks. It is a very accessible park for all ages and all levels of mobility. It is also a great place for a picnic, walk or to watch a festival. It is also a great jump off point for other trails in the river valley park system. William Hawrelak Park (or simply Hawrelak Park) is named after former mayor William Hawrelak, and was formerly known as Mayfair Park. The park is home to the Heritage Amphitheatre, which is used for many festivals and performances, such as the Freewill Shakespeare Festival, the Edmonton Heritage Festival and Edmonton Symphony Orchestra's Symphony Under the Sky Festival. This walk takes us around the entire river bend starting in Hawrelak Park. Parking by picnic site #2 is a great place if you want to access the river valley trail system in a number of directions. You jump on the paved paths which lead through and out of Hawrelak Park for the time being. You have to navigate across a few roads to get to Emily Murphy Park, but the paths are well marked and are used by walkers and bikers alike. Be aware of traffic. Once in Emily Murphy Park, you can get back on the trail system, head under the bridge and you start winding your way through the nicely maintained trails. Covered in trees and foliage, it is a relaxing and beautiful walk. Occasionally, you get some great views of the river and sometimes come upon other users of the trails, but it is a very quiet stroll. There is an elevation change as you approach Hawrelak Park again and you find yourself on the backside of the park. You will pass the picnic areas and the lake as you make your way back to Picnic Site #2. An enjoyable and relaxing walk.Show more
#6 - Whitemud Trail South
Whitemud Ravine Nature Reserve
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(173)
Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 22 m
#7 - Terwillegar Park Perimeter Loop
Terwillegar Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(140)
Length: 2.6 mi • Est. 1 h 14 m
#8 - Fort Edmonton Park Loop Trail
Fort Edmonton Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(171)
Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 26 m
Providing the best in historically authentic living history, Fort Edmonton Park is nestled on 158 acres of beautiful wooded parkland along Edmonton's picturesque river valley. The Park is just 15 minutes from downtown Edmonton and 10 minutes from the world famous West Edmonton Mall. Fort Edmonton Park first opened in May of 1974 and has grown to become home to more than 80 historical buildings arranged into four eras of Edmonton's history. The 1846 Hudson's Bay Fort, 1885 Street, 1905 Street and 1920 Street. The Park is also home to the historic Hotel Selkirk, a 1920's Midway, the Yukon & Pacific steam engine and train, four original early 1900's street cars as well as buggy rides, wagon rides and a stagecoach. In mid-summer of 2011, the new 250-seat Capitol Theatre opened to the public featuring an extraordinary short film on the history of Edmonton. Historical interpreters dressed in period costume bring Fort Edmonton Park to life by engaging visitors into Edmonton's world 100-150 years ago. The attendance figures for visitors to Fort Edmonton Park over the past few years has averaged in the area of 200,000 people. The Park is open on a seasonal basis in the summer, and in 2011 it opens on May 21 through to August 28, as well as all the weekends in September. Not only is Fort Edmonton Park a top tourist destination, it is also home to a very pleasant walk around it's borders. Easy access to the Fort's parking lot makes for an easy starting point. You pass the John Janzen Nature Centre on the way to the trail head on your left with Fort Edmonton Park on your Right. If you time it right, you will get to see the Park's fully operational steam engine pass by. The first half of the trail is all paved with gentle changes in elevation and is accessible for all people. On your way you will pass information markers discussing the history, tree and animal species you will see. Something new this year, and jointly funded by the RVA, is the new Fort Edmonton Footbridge and connecting trail systems. The trail system linking the new bridge is all paved and the bridge itself is spectacular. You get tremendous views of the River Valley and of the massive staircase up the Patricia Ravine. Don't pass up the opportunity to take some great photos. Walking back, you enter the bottom half of the trail system which is a packed gravel path. There is a elevation change at the beginning of the trail, but after that, the trail runs parallel to the park with little change in elevation. It is very pleasant to walk in the trees with the river on your left. You can continue walking up to the WhiteMud Ravine on the connecting trail system or head back to the parking lot.Show more
#9 - Terwillegar Park Footbridge
Edmonton, Alberta
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(75)
Length: 4.4 mi • Est. 2 h 5 m
#10 - Kinnaird Park Highlands Hiking Trail
Kinnaird Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(74)
Length: 2.7 mi • Est. 1 h 14 m
Come explore Kinnaird Park and the river valley This hike takes begins by Concordia University College of Alberta, down the connecting trail system to the western side of the Highlands Hiking Trail and through Kinnaird Park. There is ample parking along Ada Blvd where you can access the staircase leading down to the river valley or the paved bike path a little further down the road. You will head down the stairs and skirt along the edge of the Highlands Golf Club before passing through a gate which brings you under the Capilano Bridge and onto the trail. The Highlands Hiking Trail is a favorite of residents and is a off leash area for pets. It provides great access to the riverside and views of downtown as you move along. It is a very relaxing spot with plenty of places for photography. As you exit the Highlands Trail, you enter Kinnaird Park. Formally known as Rat Creek Ravine, it is now named after George L. Kinnaird (1857-1922) who was a pioneer Edmonton civil servant. In 1900 he became Edmonton's town clerk, and advanced to become city commissioner. In 1910, he established an accounting firm, and in 1915 was appointed auditor for the city. The official name change for the Ravine and park was approved in 1967. The walk through Kinnaird Park is an enjoyable one with picnic tables and great city views. It is a popular trail system, which also has its own Facebook page. The Friends of the Kinnaird Ravine keeps people connected and up to date on happenings in the park. An interesting feature of this Park is that it was constructed to be accessible for the blind, with raised wooden rails on the gravel paths and trail markers in braille. These features are still there, but have fallen out of use. On your way along the trail, you will pass an outcropping which resembes a mini Hoodoo formation, but is actually a bentonite outcrop. If you carry on down the path, you will enter Dawson Park. Heading back and reaching the junction point, you begin to climb up out of the park and can either take the staircase back to Ada Blvd or use the paved switchback road. Either way, this is a pleasant walk.Show more
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