Explore the best trails near Puyallup with detailed reviews, photos, trail maps, and driving directions curated by hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

hiking

trail running

walking

kid friendly

trail locations for Puyallup, Washington

First time on this trail..

It was nice,
but it's inhabited by some creepy looking folks..

Abbot muddy after a pretty rainy day, but a nice walk. Periodic views of the creek makes for some nice scenery.

Great 2 mile walk. About half way through I wanted to check the distance and found that I had forgot to tap record. While using All Trails I also use S Health to track activity and other exercise so at least I got it recorded there.

Great walk. Cool, rainy and had the trail all to myself.

Great walk cool and wet. Very minor sprinkles toward the end. The last third or quarter of a hike, walk, run is when the real workout begins. That's when you're tired and sweaty. That's when you have to keep pushing to maintain speed or if you can go just a little bit faster. When you're tired and sweaty and want to slow down that's when you build perseverance or mental toughness to not slow down and if possible go just a little faster.

I used to be more interested in hiking than walking because hiking is usually more of a challenge with hills and other obstacles. But walking on mostly flat trails is a great way to build speed and endurance especially when you're tired. Before walking this trail regularly my average speed was about 2.5mph and a max of 3.5mph. But now that I have been walking this trail consistantly my average speed is usually 3mph and max of 5 to 5.5mph.

Even if your average speed is only 1mph try to maintain that toward the end when you're tired instead of slowing down. If you can go just one or two steps faster toward the end that is what builds stamina and endurance. When I push up the intensity and go a little faster, even if only for say 10 or 15 minutes, it may only be one or two tenths of a mile quicker but it sure increases the workout.

Regular walking, running, or hiking keeps many parts of the body strong like the neck, shoulders, back and hips. I occasionally have lower back pain esp if I find myself sleeping in a bad postition. But since I have been hiking and walking regularly my lower back pain has become very infrequent and when it happens it's not as bad. Regular walking, running and hiking is good general body conditioning for being able to do everyday stuff like yard work, house cleaning, even being able to walk through large stores without having to stop and rest. It's also good for the heart rate and strengthening the heart and lung muscles, also good if you have trouble with constipation to help keep things moving.

Increasing my endurance and speed walking mostly flat trails has made a significant improvement in endurance and strength while hiking more difficult places like Clarks Creek. Maintaining a brisk pace while hiking more difficult trails is an even more intense workout for strength training. The best part about exercising outside is it's free! No gym membership, can get your workout in anytime day or night.

Always forward! Never backward!

Great walk. A little warm should've wore shorts instead of pants.

Rainy, but a great walk. Started out wearing a hoody and pants cause I didn't plan on going for a fast walk. Wasn't sure if I should wear the rain poncho or use the umbrella. Decided to use the umbrella cause it's not as much material and doesn't need to be hung up to dry.

10 minutes in I'm walking kinda fast and starting to get too warm. Hoody came off and didn't need the umbrella for quite awhile because the rain stopped. 20 or so minutes later tshirt came off cause I'm walking fast and getting sweaty. I usually prefer to not wear a shirt when hiking or walking cause it gets quite sweaty and sticks to me afterward and takes awhile to dry.

While not wearing the shirt I use it to wipe my brow and face occasionally and it's still doesn't get as sweaty as when I wear it. Half way through I was wishing I had wore shorts instead of pants cause my legs are getting quite sweaty and making me hot. I wanted to slow down a bit but I kept a fast brisk pace to keep building that mental toughness and perseverence to keep pushing which also builds physical endurance.

Wow I'm really exhausted. My fastest time so far at 49:22. Walking around the full circle of the ball fields makes the whole trail somewhere between 2.5 to 2.85 miles depending on the accuracy of the tracking device.

Haven't walked or hiked in awhile but still made excellent time at 50:46. Not sure why but All Trails and S Health were wildly inaccurate with tracking today. Both didn't track straight lines in many places, very zig-zaggy. Going all the way around the fields the trail is about 2.5 miles. All Trails recorded 5.7x and S Health was 2.8x.

A tad warm but still a great walk. When walking through the parking lot watch for cars backing out. As I'm approaching cars I look at the driver seats to see if there is anyone sitting there, listen for if the vehicle is running and especially look for back up lights. If the windows are really dark or it's a taller vehicle like a van, truck or SUV you might not be able to see if someone is in the drivers seat.

Also if you're about to back out DO NOT start backing up until you have made sure no one is walking past. From a distance I a suburban SUV that was sitting there with the vehicle in reverse and they didn't actually backout until I was quite a ways past. Either they saw me coming from 50+ feet away or they were idling in reverse which is a HUGE mistake. If you forget the vehicle is in reverse and take your foot off the break or your foot accidently comes off the brake you could run someone over or hit another vehicle. If I pull over in a parking lot or even the side of the road to text for awhile I always put it in Park. For one than my leg doesn't get tired holding the brake. And more importantly if a cop stops they can't say you were driving and texting because the vehicle is in Park. It happened one time to me when a sheriff happened to drive by and stopped to see if everything was ok.

So anyway, after walking past the suburban I was about to walk past a fullsize truck that was running. Driver put it in reverse and barely moved and started to turn the tires to back out than saw me and stopped. This truck was also parked amongst other vehicles so that makes it hard to see if it's clear. Drivers ed 101 DO NOT start backing up until you know it's clear. Walking down the middle of the lot would be safer than walking close to cars but on the other hand I don't want to be in the way while walking past the long stretches of empty parking spots.

When I started driving I found it easier to park and leave our split level driveway by backing in. Drive in forward than backdown to the lower level to park. Through the years backing in has become the way I naturally park. With a couple different jobs I have worked backing in was better because than when it was time to leave it made it easier to follow the construction crew I was with that day.

More importantly backing in makes it safer to pull out of a spot. Unfortunately there's a large gray SUV with very dark windows parked on my left. So even coming out forward there's still a blindspot but all you can do is creep forward slowly so other vehicles or people approaching know you're coming out. To make backing in easy I put a blindspot mirror on the bottom outside corners of the outside mirrors. They are 1 inch adjustable mirrors so I tilt them down a little toward the back tires so I can see the front edge of the back tire on the ground at the bottom right of the driver blindspot mirror. Than I can see where the tire and parking stall line is and also still be able to use the blindspot mirror for lane changes. It takes practice but after awhile it becomes natural, in fact for me it feels weird to drive in forward and back out. Sometimes it can be hard to know how far to back in if there's another car behind or a parking post for something. If I'm not sure how far I can go back I back in until the nose of my vehicle is about even with the end of the lines than stop. Occasionally I'll have to open the driver window to look out and see the front tip of the line so I can estimate how far back to go. If there is nothing behind the parking stall I back up gently until the tires touch the curb, so the tires aren't squished I may pull forward slightly.

A tad warm but still a great walk. When walking through the parking lot watch for cars backing out. As I'm approaching cars I look at the driver seats to see if there is anyone sitting there, listen for if the vehicle is running and especially look for back up lights. If the windows are really dark or it's a taller vehicle like a van, truck or SUV you might not be able to see if someone is in the drivers seat.

Also if you're about to back out DO NOT start backing up until you have made sure no one is walking past. From a distance I saw a suburban SUV that was sitting there with the vehicle in reverse and they didn't actually backout until I was quite a ways past. Either they saw me coming from 50+ feet away or they were idling in reverse which is a HUGE mistake. If you forget the vehicle is in reverse and take your foot off the break or your foot accidently comes off the brake you could run someone over or hit another vehicle. If I pull over in a parking lot or even the side of the road to text for awhile I always put it in Park. For one than my leg doesn't get tired holding the brake. And more importantly if a cop stops they can't say you were driving and texting because the vehicle is in Park. It happened one time to me when a sheriff happened to drive by and stopped to see if everything was ok.

So anyway, after walking past the suburban I was about to walk past a fullsize truck that was running. Driver put it in reverse and barely moved and started to turn the tires to back out than saw me and stopped. This truck was also parked amongst other vehicles so that makes it hard to see if it's clear. Drivers ed 101 DO NOT start backing up until you know it's clear. Walking down the middle of the lot would be safer than walking close to cars but on the other hand I don't want to be in the way while walking past the long stretches of empty parking spots.

When I started driving I found it easier to park and leave our split level driveway by backing in. Drive in forward than backdown to the lower level to park. Through the years backing in has become the way I naturally park. With a couple different jobs I have worked backing in was better because than when it was time to leave it made it easier to follow the construction crew I was with that day.

More importantly backing in makes it safer to pull out of a spot. Unfortunately there's a large gray SUV with very dark windows parked on my left. So even coming out forward there's still a blindspot but all you can do is creep forward slowly so other vehicles or people approaching know you're coming out. To make backing in easy I put a blindspot mirror on the bottom outside corners of the outside mirrors.

They are 1 inch adjustable mirrors so I tilt them down a little toward the back tires so I can see the front edge of the back tire on the ground at the bottom right of the driver blindspot mirror. Than I can see where the tire and parking stall line is and also still be able to use the blindspot mirror for lane changes. It takes practice but after awhile it becomes natural, in fact for me it feels weird to drive in forward and back out. Sometimes it can be hard to know how far to back in if there's another car behind or a parking post for something. If I'm not sure how far I can go back I back in until the nose of my vehicle is about even with the end of the lines than stop. Occasionally I'll have to open the driver window to look out and see the front tip of the line so I can estimate how far back to go. If there is nothing behind the parking stall I back up gently until the tires touch the curb, so the tires aren't squished I may pull forward slightly.

Cool day and a lot of shade make a great hike. Didn't really want to do 2 laps but I kept pushing for the workout and to build perseverance.

Nice cool day for a walk

Think this is my fastest 2 laps so far. When I hike or walk for exercise I push myself to maintain a brisk pace on the flat and esp going up hills. Whether running or walking trying to maintain a fast pace up hills increases the workout. I also maintain a brisk pace over long periods so it increases endurance and stamina. Of course the 2nd lap I was more tired than the first and could tell I was going a little slower. But I still maintained a brisk pace that I could sustain for a long period. As I do a 2nd lap my strength and stamina does go up and down but I maintain a brisk pace even though it's a bit slower.

Pushing to go just a little faster and maintain speed increases the physical endurance and stamina and even more importantly the mental endurance and stamina. During a 2nd or 3rd lap it can be hard to not think about how tired I am. But allowing those thoughts to happen can slow me down and make me want to stop even if it's just for a few seconds. I do my best to just concentrate on the trail and watch for tripping hazards.

Hiking or walking fast for endurance and stamina on a trail you know well means that when you're out for a more leisurely walk or hike site sight seeing, shopping at a mall or taking your time on a new trail you'll have more strength and stamina over a longer period because you're not pushing your body for exercise and tiring more quickly.

Wow what a workout. I walked the full circle around the ball fields at the school instead of just half like usual. I thought maybe it was an extra half mile but after looking at the map It's probably only a few tenths longer. Still a great way to make a slightly longer workout. Great day for outdoor exercise with the cool air and the breeze.

What a great walk with it being cool and the wind blowing

Great cool day for a hike. I didn't want to do all the hills on the trail again so I walked the loop after the trail. After getting a good leg and cardio workout it was nice to keep it going a little longer walking the loop around.

Don't even get me started on all the excessive chalk lines someone made all over the trail and through the park. Making looong lines for direction when there are already arrows marking the trail, or making lines when the only option is straight on the trail. Next time tie marking ribbon on branches or use little field cones. Oh thats right, thats too much work and you don't want to clean up after yourself or a race so you did it the lazy way with chalk. Now we have to look at the chalk graffiti until the rain washes it away.

How to mark a trail with cones, ribbon or other markers: Put one marker before a junction and one after the junction to indicate straight ahead. Put one marker before a junction and one at the turn, right turn right side of the trail at the corner of the right turn, left turn left side of the trail at the corner of the turn. Or even more simple than that put your marker at the corner of the turn and no marker after that junction. But if you're not limited on markers doing it before the turn and one at the turn is helpful if you need to walk the same route back. Than when you come back to the same junction you know which way to turn and the direction is confirmed by the trail marker that is straight a little ways ahead on the trail. The person could of did the same thing making chalk dots on the trail instead of loooong unsightly lines that are going to take quite awhile to be worn away by foot traffic and rain.