Explore the best trails near Puyallup with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

hiking

trail running

walking

kid friendly

trail locations for Puyallup, Washington

I used to rollerblade a lot in West Seattle. Is that something that is frowned upon from cyclists on this trail?

I went this trail today.That was first experience and I was lost. Mountain climbing, quiet trail, I like here.and My dog like here too!!

mountain biking
11 days ago

have to say small but challenging

15 days ago

Cool and cloudy. Great day for a walk.

Great hike, cold but partly sunny day. There is a small mental health facility near the park and some of the residents walk here occasionally. Having worked in mental health and corrections for 13 years I can say with great confidence the facility wouldn't allow residents to leave without staff if a resident was a danger to themself or others. For unsupervised time to happen it has to be approved by a doctor, therapist or other highly trained professional who is very familiar with the resident and their behavior.

There are also a number of homeless people that wander around Puyallup and frequent parks and other places like shopping centers. One big draw for the homeless is the Freezing Nights program that rotates between area churches so the homeless have a safe place to sleep. I had a couple friends that used the program often and there are many good people that use the program.

If someone is "afraid" of people that look or act different than how you think people should look or act then you need self defense classes. Can also buy self defense spray (pepper spray, mace, bear spray). There's also a lot of cheap easy to use self defense items for sale online, even on sites like ebay. Monkey fist, self defense pen, self defense rings, kubaton and many other things. On ebay search self defense and you'll have many options.

Be alert and aware of your surroundings. Predators, both animals and humans, like to attack easy targets. Walk with confidence with good posture. Do a search on youtube for self defense and watch some videos. Walking sticks, canes and fullsize umbrella's also make great self defense tools and there are videos that show that on youtube.

There's also the option of getting a concealed weapon permit. In Washington State you can even carry a firearm concealed without a permit if you're in the wilderness. Google RCW 9.41.060 or go to http://apps.leg.wa.gov and search the number and scroll to section 8. I highly doubt a heavily wooded park in the city counts but I still wanted to mention the law. Also check out the ADTA at www.armeddefense.org. Great organization that teaches self defense and responsible firearm training.

The All Trails app is all about discovering and exploring wild places and people that use the app need to be more prepared for self defense, first aid and survival while using All Trails to explore. Few of my favorite channels to watch on youtube are Preparedmind101, Nutnfancy, Gideons Tactical, Living Survival, Skinny Medic.

While hiking and walking trails I greet people with a smile and say hi, how's it going, great day huh, or some other friendly greeting. For one you never know when you may be injured or need some other kind of help and if you hike or walk the same trails frequently you're likely to see the same people. You don't want them to think of you as some weird awkward person or someone who's conceited and aloof. Also making eye contact and acknowledging people is good for self confidence and makes your day and someone else's brighter.

Happy trails y'all

First time on this trail..

It was nice,
but it's inhabited by some creepy looking folks..

walking
2 months ago

Abbot muddy after a pretty rainy day, but a nice walk. Periodic views of the creek makes for some nice scenery.

Great 2 mile walk. About half way through I wanted to check the distance and found that I had forgot to tap record. While using All Trails I also use S Health to track activity and other exercise so at least I got it recorded there.

Great walk. Cool, rainy and had the trail all to myself.

Great walk cool and wet. Very minor sprinkles toward the end. The last third or quarter of a hike, walk, run is when the real workout begins. That's when you're tired and sweaty. That's when you have to keep pushing to maintain speed or if you can go just a little bit faster. When you're tired and sweaty and want to slow down that's when you build perseverance or mental toughness to not slow down and if possible go just a little faster.

I used to be more interested in hiking than walking because hiking is usually more of a challenge with hills and other obstacles. But walking on mostly flat trails is a great way to build speed and endurance especially when you're tired. Before walking this trail regularly my average speed was about 2.5mph and a max of 3.5mph. But now that I have been walking this trail consistantly my average speed is usually 3mph and max of 5 to 5.5mph.

Even if your average speed is only 1mph try to maintain that toward the end when you're tired instead of slowing down. If you can go just one or two steps faster toward the end that is what builds stamina and endurance. When I push up the intensity and go a little faster, even if only for say 10 or 15 minutes, it may only be one or two tenths of a mile quicker but it sure increases the workout.

Regular walking, running, or hiking keeps many parts of the body strong like the neck, shoulders, back and hips. I occasionally have lower back pain esp if I find myself sleeping in a bad postition. But since I have been hiking and walking regularly my lower back pain has become very infrequent and when it happens it's not as bad. Regular walking, running and hiking is good general body conditioning for being able to do everyday stuff like yard work, house cleaning, even being able to walk through large stores without having to stop and rest. It's also good for the heart rate and strengthening the heart and lung muscles, also good if you have trouble with constipation to help keep things moving.

Increasing my endurance and speed walking mostly flat trails has made a significant improvement in endurance and strength while hiking more difficult places like Clarks Creek. Maintaining a brisk pace while hiking more difficult trails is an even more intense workout for strength training. The best part about exercising outside is it's free! No gym membership, can get your workout in anytime day or night.

Always forward! Never backward!

Great walk. A little warm should've wore shorts instead of pants.

Rainy, but a great walk. Started out wearing a hoody and pants cause I didn't plan on going for a fast walk. Wasn't sure if I should wear the rain poncho or use the umbrella. Decided to use the umbrella cause it's not as much material and doesn't need to be hung up to dry.

10 minutes in I'm walking kinda fast and starting to get too warm. Hoody came off and didn't need the umbrella for quite awhile because the rain stopped. 20 or so minutes later tshirt came off cause I'm walking fast and getting sweaty. I usually prefer to not wear a shirt when hiking or walking cause it gets quite sweaty and sticks to me afterward and takes awhile to dry.

While not wearing the shirt I use it to wipe my brow and face occasionally and it's still doesn't get as sweaty as when I wear it. Half way through I was wishing I had wore shorts instead of pants cause my legs are getting quite sweaty and making me hot. I wanted to slow down a bit but I kept a fast brisk pace to keep building that mental toughness and perseverence to keep pushing which also builds physical endurance.

Wow I'm really exhausted. My fastest time so far at 49:22. Walking around the full circle of the ball fields makes the whole trail somewhere between 2.5 to 2.85 miles depending on the accuracy of the tracking device.

Haven't walked or hiked in awhile but still made excellent time at 50:46. Not sure why but All Trails and S Health were wildly inaccurate with tracking today. Both didn't track straight lines in many places, very zig-zaggy. Going all the way around the fields the trail is about 2.5 miles. All Trails recorded 5.7x and S Health was 2.8x.

A tad warm but still a great walk. When walking through the parking lot watch for cars backing out. As I'm approaching cars I look at the driver seats to see if there is anyone sitting there, listen for if the vehicle is running and especially look for back up lights. If the windows are really dark or it's a taller vehicle like a van, truck or SUV you might not be able to see if someone is in the drivers seat.

Also if you're about to back out DO NOT start backing up until you have made sure no one is walking past. From a distance I a suburban SUV that was sitting there with the vehicle in reverse and they didn't actually backout until I was quite a ways past. Either they saw me coming from 50+ feet away or they were idling in reverse which is a HUGE mistake. If you forget the vehicle is in reverse and take your foot off the break or your foot accidently comes off the brake you could run someone over or hit another vehicle. If I pull over in a parking lot or even the side of the road to text for awhile I always put it in Park. For one than my leg doesn't get tired holding the brake. And more importantly if a cop stops they can't say you were driving and texting because the vehicle is in Park. It happened one time to me when a sheriff happened to drive by and stopped to see if everything was ok.

So anyway, after walking past the suburban I was about to walk past a fullsize truck that was running. Driver put it in reverse and barely moved and started to turn the tires to back out than saw me and stopped. This truck was also parked amongst other vehicles so that makes it hard to see if it's clear. Drivers ed 101 DO NOT start backing up until you know it's clear. Walking down the middle of the lot would be safer than walking close to cars but on the other hand I don't want to be in the way while walking past the long stretches of empty parking spots.

When I started driving I found it easier to park and leave our split level driveway by backing in. Drive in forward than backdown to the lower level to park. Through the years backing in has become the way I naturally park. With a couple different jobs I have worked backing in was better because than when it was time to leave it made it easier to follow the construction crew I was with that day.

More importantly backing in makes it safer to pull out of a spot. Unfortunately there's a large gray SUV with very dark windows parked on my left. So even coming out forward there's still a blindspot but all you can do is creep forward slowly so other vehicles or people approaching know you're coming out. To make backing in easy I put a blindspot mirror on the bottom outside corners of the outside mirrors. They are 1 inch adjustable mirrors so I tilt them down a little toward the back tires so I can see the front edge of the back tire on the ground at the bottom right of the driver blindspot mirror. Than I can see where the tire and parking stall line is and also still be able to use the blindspot mirror for lane changes. It takes practice but after awhile it becomes natural, in fact for me it feels weird to drive in forward and back out. Sometimes it can be hard to know how far to back in if there's another car behind or a parking post for something. If I'm not sure how far I can go back I back in until the nose of my vehicle is about even with the end of the lines than stop. Occasionally I'll have to open the driver window to look out and see the front tip of the line so I can estimate how far back to go. If there is nothing behind the parking stall I back up gently until the tires touch the curb, so the tires aren't squished I may pull forward slightly.