Ozette Triangle Trail

MODERATE 37 reviews
#15 of 168 trails in

Ozette Triangle Trail is a 8.7 mile heavily trafficked loop trail located near Sekiu, Washington that features beautiful wild flowers and is rated as moderate. The trail offers a number of activity options and is accessible year-round.

8.7 miles 613 feet Loop

kid friendly

backpacking

birding

camping

hiking

nature trips

trail running

walking

beach

forest

views

wild flowers

wildlife

old growth

rocky

scramble

no dogs

From Port Angeles, E 5 miles on US 101 to Highway 112. Right (west) for 49 miles to Hoko/Ozette Lake Rd. Left for 21 miles to the trailhead at Ozette Lake. There is a $15 fee for car entrance.

hiking
7 days ago

1 month ago

Take the north-south route. Great hike.

2 months ago

it was not 8.7 miles, it's about 9.2 miles, but it was awesome, make sure you get a tide table since you can't hike the beach during high tide.

hiking
5 months ago

hiking
5 months ago

hiking
5 months ago

hiking
6 months ago

6 months ago

7 months ago

This trail is easy unless you run into a bear, then it becomes moderate.

hiking
7 months ago

backpacking
7 months ago

Awesome trail. Mixes in a lot of varied sightseeing... Forest, lake and streams, ocean, and rugged beach. Overnight camp in cape Alva was amazing.

backpacking
7 months ago

These trails are in very good condition. The boardwalks were dry, so I can't speak to how slippery they can get, but they have clearly been replacing the bad portions of it. I was actually bored on the inland trails because the vegetation didn't change much, and the terrain was a few stairs short of wheelchair accessible. The site camping at Cape Alava was a bit too close quarters, but there was plenty of sandy beach for those wishing a little more elbow room. The haystacks were nice to view, and the sunset was pretty behind them. On day 2 I hiked along the beach at low tide to Sandy Point. It was a fast and easy trek, though the fine sand was slightly challenging with 40lbs on my back. This is a great beginner hike or beginner backpacking destination for all ages.
I'm going back this weekend. This time I'll take my son so he can be one of those folks who has fond childhood memories of this beautiful place.

hiking
8 months ago

Awesome trail -- saw bald eagles and a deer and her fawns. Highlight is the walk along the beach -- make sure to bring sunscreen and good hiking shoes, because if you don't make it through the beachfront during low tide you have to do a bit of a rock scramble.

hiking
8 months ago

Went on this hike with my sister. We camped overnight and hiked during the day. A deer came up to our tent. Saw eagles on the stacks, otters, and all kinds of wildlife. I highly recommend this triangle. Make sure you check the tide charts before you do the middle section of the loop-there are some spots where a hiker could get stranded during high tide. And keep an eye out for rock art. We saw a few carvings.

backpacking
9 months ago

Fantastic. The Alava to Sand Point hike is a bit rich in soft sand, but really awesome.

9 months ago

amazing!

10 months ago

Not many visitors during spring break, but it still was beautiful! Don't walk in the dead blue stuff because your shoes will stink for days.

hiking
1 year ago

We did a one-night backpack sleeping a Sand Point here in August 2015. It was my friend's first backpack trip, and it was a good one for her. It's nice and flat, although hiking on the rocky beach is kind of rough going. I recommend doing the beach section of the hike at low tide. At high tide you have to get around the large logs laying on the beach somehow, which is challenging. Wish Creek, which is the water source at the Sand Point camping area, is so low that it doesn't even reach the ocean. The water in it was the color of black tea. The rangers told us that this is caused by tannins in the vegetation surrounding the creek and is not a sign of contamination. But we didn't know that until we returned our bear cans at the ranger station after the trip. It was pretty crowded there even though permits are required. We didn't see any bears or raccoons.

hiking
1 year ago

My sister and I backpacked and camped for the first time and this trail was perfect for us. The most difficult thing was figuring out how to get camping reservations and our passes. You have to fax (old school) a reservation request to Wildlife Information Center and wait to be accepted. Then you have to pick up the pass the day of the trip and the center is in Port Angeles, which is about 3 hours away from the trailhead, and doesn't open until 8:30am. They do let you rent a Bear Can for food storage for 3 bucks, which is cool because those things can be pricey! Because of the awkward size of the bear can, it can't really be strapped to the outside of your pack so we had to move stuff around to make it fit. Luckily my sister is a seasoned backpacker and made it work. We got a later start than we wanted to and decided to head to Sand Point first because we wanted to get the majority of our hike over with on the first day. We did have to be mindful of the tide, because that impacts the trail severely. Our camping reservations were for Wedding Rock. The majority of the trail is on a very well maintained boardwalk, I was impressed. Once we got to the beach it was a bit foggy, but gorgeous. We did see the first and only sea lion of the trip at Sand Point but unfortunately it was dead. We did hear a bunch more near Cape Alava the next day though. We didn't really check out Sand Point because we wanted to hit Wedding Rock and find a campsite before high tide so we wouldn't have to do the overland trails. The wedding rock campsites were awesome. There's only a few and they are not marked very well at all. We got a little confused trying to find them. But when you get to a wooden crate that says welcome to wedding rock, you are there. Our biggest complaint is that we didn't actually see the wedding rocks, we couldn't find them. We didn't know if they were out on the haystacks accessible only at low tide or what. Later we found out that they are at high tide. Our bad, that was literally the only bummer. The bugs weren't bad. The skeeters came out at night but a little repellent did the job. The bugs when your hiking on the beach that are hovering over the seaweed and kelp were a little annoying. Low Tide was very cool because you could go and explore the tide pools. We had never seen so many Hermit crabs and other little crabs in our life. If you like solitude, I suggest camping at wedding rock, but you can't have a fire. If you are a big group or like a bunch of people around you, Cape Alava is good camping for you. Last thing, If you are doing this in one day, give yourself time to take a long break. Hiking on the beach over rocks and in the sand adds some difficulty. Also factor in another at least mile or two of walking if you plan on exploring the tide pools at low tide. It was our first backpacking camping trip and we survived, so I think it's perfect for beginners.