Good Water Loop

MODERATE 34 reviews
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Good Water Loop is a 26.9 mile moderately trafficked loop trail located near Georgetown, TX that features a lake and is rated as moderate. The trail offers a number of activity options and is accessible year-round. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash.

26.9 miles 1519 feet Loop

dogs on leash

camping

hiking

nature trips

trail running

walking

lake

views

wild flowers

rocky

San Gabriel River Trail - Goodwater loop is located near Georgetown, Texas. The trail is good for all skill levels and primarily used for hiking.

2 months ago

hiking
2 months ago

Great quiet trail for regular hikes near Georgetown, TX. Nice water views and some rocky terrain, but not difficult.

hiking
3 months ago

backpacking
3 months ago

Nice trail, not too packed and dog friendly. There are ample water sources since the trail goes through or by every campground. The trail can be a bit poorly marked in places but navigable nonetheless. No permits needed, though available maps all suck so I suggest using Alltrails maps to help out (download or print). Started at Tejas and hiked south side first, that was the only way we figured possible without paying for camp reservations...Easy hiking

hiking
3 months ago

Love this trail! My dog and I went in the middle of the day, completely quiet for a good couple hours. Be careful when it has rained, it can get really slippery! About a mile down the trail where you hit the water is a perfect place to stop and relax and enjoy the water, which my dog definitely did!

5 months ago

We hiked from Cedar Breaks trailhead to the cedar hollow campsite (about 9 miles round trip). It was an enjoyable hike with some elevation changes and views of the water. This is a medium hike and I would recommend hiking boots because there are a lot of rocks and a little shower can make it very slick. Will definitely come back.

birding
8 months ago

Great trail, beautiful scenery!! I know it's rated as hard but honestly any skill level it's fine. The only thing would be is that it is a very long trail so if you're planning on tackle in it be there really early.

9 months ago

This was our first trip here!!! It was a Tuesday morning. It was just me and my wife the whole time. Quiet no traffic noise what so ever. The lake is breathtaking and the scenery is second to none. A little rocky and un-even in certain parts. Wouldn't be the greatest for toddlers as far as hiking goes. However, I will be back to camp and fish with the whole family.

hiking
9 months ago

Worth doing for the length and proximity if you're nearby. Just a nice hill country walk with a couple places to camp. Easy. No idea why it's marked as hard.

cross country skiing
1 year ago

1 year ago

Great trail. Not sure what the total mileage is around the lake. Will go back many more times in the future.

hiking
1 year ago

Trail was okay. Very manicured- signed of heavy use. Best part of trail was the lake at the end of the trail. It was very picturesque.

This trail was rated "hard", but it should be rated as EASY.

1 year ago

hiking
1 year ago

Very rough and rocky first 3 miles. Lots of stub cedars to go through. Lake looked lovely. I'm glad we chose this hike from Georgetown as many other hiking areas were crowded. This trail was more remote. Neat old homestead area and springs at mile 2.5.

camping
1 year ago

This was our standard "go-to" backpacking training area when I was a Scoutmaster. Great for both older and younger Scouts as you can do it in segments to customize a trek without having to do the entire loop. The difficulty level ranges from easy to moderate with plenty of places to insert or exfil along the way. The overall distance is great for building up backpacking endurance. Rain adds a totally new dimension to the difficulty level as many of the more challenging segments are somewhat rocky. There are a number of campsites along the way.

hiking
1 year ago

It's a long trail and has some beautiful places on it. My dogs have flushed out some wild hogs in the past. Seen quite a bit of wildlife along the way. I don't like how closed in it has become by the city of Georgetown, therefore will not backpack there. Creepy to be backpacking where there's a neighborhood not far behind the bushes. Of course, not all of the backpacking camps are that close to roads, but too close for my comfort.

1 year ago

12/6/14. Hiked from Cedar Break trailhead to Crockett Falls with my 7 year old. This was a beautiful hike, and I would love to see the rest of the trail. This section was about 2.5 miles in and obviously 2.5 miles out. it was very rocky but gorgeous. We passed several groups of hikers and several had dogs with them. I would definitely recommend this hike. The lady at the gate said it was no charge if you were hiking, just signed my name and vehicle license plate on the log. Excellent way to spend a Saturday, and only cost the gas money to get here.

hiking
1 year ago

hiking
1 year ago

I just hiked this trail this weekend. For Texas, this place rocks! Ha! Also a pun, because as others have noted, sections of the hike are quite rocky. For us, it was also very muddy as both morning we hiked saw heavy rains. This is the type of mud that fills in the tread on your shoes, and makes every step a potential Van Damme splits moment. Also, I kicked 2 prickly pears, because I am awesome and extremely coordinated.

We started at Cedar Breaks and went clockwise. Though it seems like a simple loop trail, we managed to get lost every time the trail emerged at a parking lot. The problem is that though the trail can be well signed when there are no real reasons to need a sign, when the trail comes out of the woods or to a fork it is completely unsigned. For instance, Russell Park Campground was referred to as Rustler Trailhead at mile ~15.8, and the trail would otherwise continue until it peeters out into more of a deer trail, then finally into nothing. Obviously, we were confused and went the wrong way.

I think it was at Russell Park where there was an unsigned fork in the trail. The map (such as it is) does not show the location of anything paved, and so we found ourselves wandering around a campground looking for where the trail would start up again to go around the lake. Luckily a very nice gentleman camping there flagged us down and told us that as far as he could surmise, the trail actually goes down the left fork just before the path to the campground. He was correct.

Then I think it was Jim Hogg, where you emerge from the woods to the trailhead, then walk across the parking lot to see the trail start again, then shortly thereafter, emerge as a park entrance gate. No signage to where the trail picks up again. You cross another lot, past the entrance gate building, and then there is a sign that shows trail to the left, which looks like its pointing down a road (perhaps to a trailhead lot?) but actually the trail goes into the woods just a bit farther down from that road and to the left.

Finally, something is going down with miles 23-26. First, there is a birds nest of little ticks on the map indicating a lot of "trail", but the "official" loop was never indicated on the trail. Also, on the map the north side of the dam is mile 24. Well, nowadays it is mile 25. The mile marker at the end of the dam is now 26. Which means the trail is a little over 27 miles? I don't know where that extra mile came from in the 23-24 region, but I am sure of the fact that mile marker 24 came well before the dam, and the dam markers are 25 and 26. Also, though they have the option to show grey for pavement on the legend, they do not indicate that miles 24-27 are on pavement. So theres that.

All in all it was a great trail considering it is in Texas and the powers that be here in this state seem to hate public places. Socialism and all that.

hiking
2 years ago

Backpacked the entire 26 mile loop this past weekend (May 10, 2014). The trail isn't exactly difficult, but the summer heat (95 deg) made it arduous. This trail is fantastic, a pleasant surprise considering Texas's overall lack of interesting backpacking trails. What sets it apart from others is the good availability of water (bring a filter though) and the variety in terrain and scenery. One minute you're in a barren desert and in a lush forest the next.

I would highly recommend it. We went clockwise around the loop, but I think going counterclockwise would be better, because miles 24-26 are basically long stretches of paved road, which can be tough at the end of a 13-mile day. Especially in the heat with no shade at all.

Note that the map is good, but not perfect. When you get to mile 23 or 24, you actually have to cross over the dam on this big paved road that looks like it's for car traffic (but it's not). To finish out the trail (mile 26), you have to walk along the path that you drove in on, so that's kind of strange. Everything else is straightforward.

Brought two small dogs, one of them had issues with sharp rocks and we had to bandage up his feet. Definitely bring dog boots for your dog.

The trail is quite secluded at times, we only saw one other backpacker group. About 5 bikers though.

I recommend entering the park at Cedar Breaks Trailhead, but I don't know the campsite situation there. All of the other campsites are truly fantastic for backpacking, but the ground is rocky so bring a groundsheet for your tent and a sleeping pad for comfort. For car camping, Tejas Camp is beautiful.