Uwharrie National Recreation Trail

MODERATE 35 reviews

Uwharrie National Recreation Trail is a 19.3 mile moderately trafficked point-to-point trail located near Mt Gilead, North Carolina that features a river and is rated as moderate. The trail offers a number of activity options and is accessible year-round. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash.

19.3 miles 3231 feet Point to Point

dogs on leash

backpacking

birding

camping

hiking

mountain biking

nature trips

trail running

walking

forest

river

views

wild flowers

wildlife

muddy

rocky

scramble

Uwharrie National Trail is a moderate trail spanning the distance between Hwy 24/27 (Troy, NC) to Flint Hill Rd (Ophir, NC). It crosses several roads, the largest of which is Hwy 109. THIS IS THE HIKING TRAIL! Not very much in the way of hills. Still, for a piedmont trail, it is a pleasant change of elevation. Quiet, remote and relaxing, UNT is well worth your time.

hiking
3 days ago

hiking
3 days ago

great trail to hike. I am a brand new hiker and me and my family loved it!!! We hiked it and switched to Keyauwee trail heading back to trail head. sort of creating our own 3.8 mile hike. took us newbys 2 hours. had a great time. will be going back to tey out other trails maybe do entire trail one day.

backpacking
9 days ago

a lot of blow downs from recent storms but the trail was clear.. heard a tree off in the distance come crashing down yesterday near nightfall. Parking lot was packed..

hiking
3 months ago

hiking
6 months ago

first time out here and won't be the last. trails are marked good and clear. nice scenery.

backpacking
6 months ago

hiking
6 months ago

7 months ago

hiking
8 months ago

10 months ago

camping
10 months ago

hiking
11 months ago

Just did a 20 mile thru-hike, from Jumping Off Rock to 24/27, this past weekend with some good friends. Had a great time. I really enjoy this trial and the others around it as well. it's nice having something this awesome close to home. I plan on hiking the 40 mile through hike in May if everything works out. Trails are well marked and I never had an issue staying on track the several times I've hiked in the Uwharries. For further info on this area I suggest checking out Don Childrey's Uwharrie Lake Region Trail Guide. An awesome guide for the Uwharrie area and its trails.

hiking
11 months ago

hiking
1 year ago

1 year ago

Great trail for a workout. It was well marked and provides plenty of distance.

1 year ago

I've done several trainings TR &WR rescue training at Uwherrie. Enjoined it very much. As a group we all had fun and a great time.

October 19th thru 23rd. My wife and I spent the week hiking and enjoying the uwharrie trail. We hiked from yates place northward passing panther creek. Just off the trail we stopped and made camp near the creek. plenty of cold clear water to filter. We then continued the next day for a short hike to Flint Hill Road where we met a wild turkey that took a liking to my wife and followed her to Ophir Road. After road hiking back to Yates Place we set up camp for the night. We the completed the Uwharrie Trail to the 24 trailhead where we camped and the headed back north on the Lower and Upper Dutchman Creek Trail. We feel in love with this trail and hope to hike it time after time again. There are plenty of water sources and established campsites on the trail.

hiking
1 year ago

Adding this because a few reviewers reported trouble following the trail. The following is from the Uwharrie Mountain Run website at the link below. IMHO their advice to FOLLOW THE WHITE BLAZES is all you need to know at normal hiking speed unless you are subject to daydreaming (and I stand in awe of trail runners who do the entire 20.5 miles at an 8.2 MPH pace).

"TRAIL WARNINGS"

"Running the Uwharrie Trail is a true adventure that requires intense concentration. The national forest terrain is hilly and the trail is treacherous. Fallen leaves conceal rocks, roots, sticks, and holes. Expect to trip and fall at least once during the day. If you turn an ankle, keep moving. Dutchman’s Creek flows along part of the trail and runners will enjoy numerous stream crossings, which may mean wet feet if you aren’t careful. The creek water is not safe to drink."

"The trail is well marked with white blazes painted on trees at frequent intervals. Two blazes indicate an approaching sharp turn. Disregard yellow and red blazes. IF YOU STOP SEEING WHITE BLAZES YOU ARE OFF THE TRAIL. Retrace your steps to the last white blaze then circle around until you find the trail. If you find yourself in a part of the forest posted with hunting signs YOU ARE OFF THE TRAIL. Don’t follow other runners into unblazed territory. Don’t become discouraged if you get lost. Even experienced trail runners occasionally lose their way."

hiking
1 year ago

Horrible maps, almost no signs letting you know where the trails were directions were off several degrees.

hiking
1 year ago

I've been on different sections of this trail over many years but decided to hike the entire trail (South to North) on Saturday. The weather was clear and cool and I thoroughly enjoyed the quiet morning solitude (began at sunrise 6:30 AM) and then lots of happy Scouts on the latter section beyond Highway 109. The Mountain Laurel was in full bloom accompanied by the flute-like melodies of Wood Thrushes. Just a great Spring day to enjoy God's creations!