Green Valley Trail

EASY 15 reviews

Green Valley Trail is a 2.2 mile loop trail located near Fairfield, CA that features a cave and is good for all skill levels. The trail offers a number of activity options and is accessible year-round. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash.

2.3 miles 396 feet Loop

dogs on leash

kid friendly

birding

hiking

mountain biking

nature trips

road biking

trail running

walking

cave

views

A walking path through a greenway nestled between suburban homes Follow the path North-East towards the Main Park

hiking
1 month ago

We had a pleasant 7-mile (3.5 hour) hike in Green Valley Trail today. We started at the intersection of Vintage Valley Drive and Dynasty Drive in Fairfield (Green Valley). We hiked along the pedestrian walkway past Green Valley Creek up to the park's southern entrance. We turned left onto the Black Oak Trail, left on Middle Mystic Trail, left on Twisted Tree Loop Trail, continued Junction trail to Root Trail, and left on Cliff View Trail. We continued onto Outer Loop Trail, right on Rock Garden Trail, we looped around the lake and took the Bay Area Ridge Trail to the Green Valley Trail for the return back.

3 months ago

You have to pay per person and extra for your dog and can't even just check out the area. If it was $3 for parking that would be fine but pay per person and have to keep your pass on you in case someone stops you and asks for it.

hiking
3 months ago

hiking
4 months ago

Loved the view, the shaded trees, and the trail itself was pretty challenging.

hiking
9 months ago

This was a great weekend hike! There are plenty of trail options so you can go farther or make your hike short. The scenery was beautiful! In the beginning it did seem pretty crowded, however there are many splits in the trail so once we got farther into the hike we barely saw anyone. It is definitely dog friendly, dogs $1, and $3 per person and you keep the ticket with you on your hike. We will definitely be doing this one again!

hiking
3 years ago

$3 per person, $1 per dog. Dogs MUST remain on leash or you can be ticketed $100 each. NO drinking water available. One set of bathrooms up at the lower pond. I went to to both ponds. Lower pond was totally dry, but we found tons of little tiny frogs, toads, and salamanders. Upper lake is beautiful. You can fish in it. Many bullfrogs, make trying to catch so fun. Shade along the paths. But bring plenty of water. I took a 2 & 5 year olds. Up to the upper lake, they managed fine. The climb is not too steep. Pack it in, pack it out. No garbages. 6 month family passes are available. This is a beautiful place to come hike around, explore, and enjoy all kinds if wildlife.

hiking
3 years ago

My first hike ever! It was a really good workout and a really nice view. Got really up close with some cows with my friends. Went through the main trail. I was looking forward to see the waterfall but I guess we took the wrong trail. We saw and climbed up the cave though but it was steep and slippery for first time hikers. Overall the park was really nice.

hiking
4 years ago

The park was gorgeous! Beautiful oak and manzanita trees, the little hike/climb to the cave kicked ass and it felt like we were the only ones there. How awesome is this place?

hiking
4 years ago

Beautiful views & Excellent trails! Next time I will be sure to wear better shoes. My warn out running shoes made it difficult to get up to the cave but I had fun trying.

hiking
5 years ago

I really enjoyed this trail after we reached the lake. It could have just been the time of year but prior to the like everything was just kinda dead and brown. We did the cave trail and up to the rock garden and ended up exploring the trails for about 3 hours. it was fun.. we estemate we did about 4-5 miles of this trail

hiking
5 years ago

In the 90's the day I hiked to the cave at Rockville Regional Park. The grasses were dry and the breeze was warm. The shade of the oak trees was very welcome. I especially loved the Manzanita all throughout the trails. The bark is beautiful, I took lots of pictures. A couple trail markers were confusing and when I discovered I was headed in the wrong direction for the Lake, I just continued on until I found the cave. It's a steep climb up but worth the views at the top. I came across a few mountain-bikers and a couple other hikers, but for the most part, I felt I had the park to myself.

hiking
5 years ago

I've been here twice now and both times I had a very nice hike. The trails are well taken care of and the vistas are very nice. I came to find a few geocaches and this park has quite a few.

hiking
5 years ago

I was working in Fairfield and had an afternoon free. I spent a few hours in the park, walking on the several different trails. What a treat.

hiking
5 years ago

I was recovering from arm surgery & couldn't do any difficult trails so my brother recommended Rockville Hills Park. We came to geocache and hike the beautiful oak covered hills. There are a plethora of "earth caches" in the park & we wanted to see the amazing geology of the area. There are lava and basalt cliffs & white chalk hillsides. I hope to come back when I'm recovered with my mtn bike to try out all the cool trails.

hiking
6 years ago

It is surprising how many miles of trails (about 12 ) can be crammed into a six hundred plus acre parcel of land owned and operated by the City of Fairfield. Moreover the trails are far enough apart and, for the most part, hidden from each other so that a group of hikers may believe they are the only ones hiking on any weekday (weekends excepted).



The park entrance is about 3 miles from the Abernathy Road Interchange off I-80 in the City of Fairfield. There is a fee of $3 per person, which presumably pays for trail maintenance though much of the labor is done by volunteers. An initial climb of less than 300 feet tops out with an expansive view of the lower lake and oak covered hills in the distance. Trails are named and numbered with plastic paddle trail markers. Maps are available at the entrance.
Just past the lower lake is a much larger upper lake with a resident gaggle of geese and other waterfowl. From the upper lake trails radiate in all directions. In the spring the lakes are full. In the fall they have shrunk considerable and the marshy areas around the edges where the bright yellow sun cups grow are all dried up.
For the best views, take the trail (actually a road) that leads south, climbing, dipping and climbing again for an elevation gain of several hundred feet. Along the way hikers will get close to some non-native four legged critters that look like steel towers and are, in fact, steel towers marching across the hills carrying electric power lines.
The trail leads to the southernmost point in the park overlooking Fairfield, Suisun Bay, and Mount Diablo looming out of the distant hazy sky. In some years the hills are wild with color, a mixture of blue dicks (brodiaea) and poppies. This year in spite of the spring rains, they were sparse. From the southerly viewpoint the trail drops down to a second park entrance near Green Valley Road.
Hikers and trail-bikers can spend a day or more covering all areas of the park following grassy ridges and deep canyons through oak forests and finding occasional picnic benches. One can nearly circumnavigate the park following trails that swing in and out of narrow canyons touching the boundary fence to the west, north, and east. At one time there was a north park entrance off Rockville Road, but that has been gated off.
Rockville Hills is a park for all seasons, spring wild flowers, summer recreation, fall colors, and winter rains which, if the rains are light, can be a pleasant hike through dripping forests where solitude will be plentiful without the fair weather hikers.