The park provides opportunities for backpacking, camping, picnicking, canoeing (park rents canoes), swimming (pool), golfing, wildlife viewing, hiking, and interpretive programs.

hiking
7 months ago

As Karen said, the map shown here is outdated. This trail goes only as far east as Harmon Rd (creating a smaller loop) and other trails have been rerouted. An accurate, though less detailed, map is published here: http://tpwd.texas.gov/publications/pwdpubs/media/park_maps/pwd_mp_p4505_043l.pdf. Nonetheless, it was a nice hike, shadeless but comfortable in early April. Good to see new pine growth throughout. Saw a variety of birds and only two other hiking parties.

on Lost Pines Trail

birding
11 months ago

hiking
1 year ago

This trail is not open past Harmon Rd on the E end according to park staff (this map shows it open). Did an alternate route for a really nice outing. Lunch stop at Lost Pines Overlook was a breezy place to cool off. Tons of dewberries right on the edges of the trail. Lots of new growth! The smell was awesome!

hiking
2 years ago

First time to bastrop yesterday, and all the baby pine growth is beautiful! It really gives you perspective and i cant wait to come back in 10-15 years and see this place flourish again. We did the full 7.5 mile hike and definitly should have brough more water even on a cool fall day. Not much animal presence out there, yet. Great hike! We didnt see a single other person for hours.

We traversed portions of the Lost Pines trail. We started at the scenic overlook by the route to Beuscher State Park, walked the Purple Trail to the old service road, and looped back on the Orange Trail back to the Purple Trail. It was warm for late November but the scenery was excellent. Lots of interesting flora. No significant inclines either. Our route took us almost three miles. Will be coming back in the future.

hiking
2 years ago

This was an interesting hike. The come hack after the fire is slow, but noticeable. The dead trees are continuously changing the landscape as they fall. We stayed at the cabins, which are very nice. This is a great place for individual or family fun.

hiking
2 years ago

Beautiful and peaceful. I'll go back

hiking
3 years ago

The Lost Pines Trail is easy to moderate and before the fire, beautiful! The trail is sandy at certain parts but overall very comfortable pace and good solitude if you go during the week. I've never camped on the trail but have camped at nearby North and South shore, and State Park areas. Summer in TX is HOT so recommend going late Fall or Spring. This is a good trail for the whole family but pack plenty of water!

hiking
3 years ago

Really enjoyed hiking the Lost Pines trails. I wanted to see what the forest recovery process looks like and it did not disappoint. If you are an ecology/biology fan this is one to check out. Most of the pines are completely dead and it is going to be quite the restoration process. There are trees and limbs coming down all over the place.

I was glad I was wearing pants as the new grow is really encroaching the trail in a few spots. Mostly saw lizards, ants and crickets, not too much other wildlife. Pretty dry and hot out there. There are a few points in the trails that are really sandy, made for slow going but other than that the trail moves pretty quickly.

I took the red trail/purple trail loop. The far part of the purple trail is still closed due to limited restoration following the fire. It connects via a 1/2 mile stretch on Harmon road, but it is a dirt forest road so it still feels like hiking.

A few cool views, really warm as there is no cover from the sun. I put on a lot of sunscreen before going out there. I should have brought more water as I ran out pretty quickly and the sun was not messing around. The campsites in around the red trail have water faucets though so I could refill.

A lot of portions would be great for trail running but like I said the new growth is very thick in a few places so it might be rough on the legs and feet if you are in shorts and running shoes.

Really excited to head back in a year or two to see how the forest and trails change due to the fire recovery.

hiking
3 years ago

Not great right now since the wildfire. No shade from sun. Maybe would be better in Fall.

trail running
3 years ago

The 2011 wildfire that destroyed 96% of this park has brought new meaning to the 'Lost' Pines of Texas, which are the westernmost stand of loblolly pines in America, receiving 30% less rain than the Piney Woods of East Texas. The devastation remains, but there remains a haunting beauty to the rolling hills of ashen pines that stretch as far as the eye can see. Perhaps in the spring the barrenness will be mitigated by ground cover. We went for trail running, and unfortunately even part of the 7.5 mile Lost Pines Trail has been lost and has yet to be remarked. Alternately, there's a 12 mile road that connects Bastrop and Buescher State Parks (single entry fee), and somewhere in that stretch the trees return. The drive provided us a glimmer of hope for the once and future magnificence of this park.

hiking
4 years ago

We followed the directions and it took us to Bastrop State Park. $8.00 entry fee. Nice trails, although some were closed due to the fire a year ago. Restoration was taking place. It will take a while to get the forest back, but we still enjoyed the hike.

hiking
4 years ago

I loved this trail.
There were lots of beautiful trees and also some clearings.
This is a great hike on the kind of sunny day when you want shade.
The trees shade you for nearly the full hike.
The trail is just about 8 miles but you can take shortcuts back to the beginning of the trail if you do not want to hike the whole way.
The trail is not paved but is not hard to hike.
The forest floor is pleasantly soft but not too muddy and lined with pine needles and a few small logs.
You should wear shoes with decent tread and possibly ankle support.
I recommend that you keep a second pair of shoes in your car just in case your hiking shoes get a little muddy, and a plastic bag to put the dirty shoes into.
This trail is good for all ages, even kids and elderly.
There are quite a few elevation changes (small hills) and benches to sit on every mile or so. There are also plenty of logs or stumps close by to sit on.
You must bring enough water if you plan to do the full trail, I drank about 2 liters.
I did not remember seeing any water on the trail.
Do bring a trail map too just in case.
I only saw a few people on the trail so it is nice and peaceful.

hiking
5 years ago

Evening Hike - 6:20-9:50pm - quiet solitude, no one on trail, cooler than expected for hot August weather, couple of trees down on trail, 3.5 hr hike for entire loop, last 1.5 made in the dark. South Parking closed for construction, north parking the best. Saw several Pleated (Red-headed) Woodpeckers, rabbits, deer (jumped and scared the C#@} out of me in the dark), owls. Stopped at Toad Pond using Roosevelt Cutoff to make it back to Parking. Glad I did, saw many Houston Toads. Great time for solo adventure!