The park was named for General Nathan Bedford Forrest, the intrepid Confederate cavalry leader, who on November 4, 1864, attacked and destroyed the federal supply and munitions depot at (Old) Johnsonville at the mouth of Trace Creek. His operations were concentrated along the river in the vicinity of the park and the town of Eva. In 1929 the park was dedicated to Nathan Bedford Forrest on land acquired in part from Benton County. Forrest was one of the greatest military tacticians and leaders of the American Civil War.

very nice trail, lots of history and very little foot travel.

This is a beautiful park. Highest point in Western TN! We camped right on the lake and enjoyed hiking along the beach. My dog loved running along the lake and playing in the water. There was some trash so we did a clean up making hiking the next day even more fun. We took a ranger guided canoe trip the first day. The rangers were fun and knowledgable. The trails are well marked and have sweet views of Kentucky Lake. The lady at the museum store was most helpful, kind to my dog and provided me with a color coded trail map. Really a nice park!

Actually took the 5 mile hike. you can choose between, a 3, 5, 10, and 20 mile hike. The 5 mile was easy to moderate, with 1 good elevation change, ( 200 to 250 ft) right before the shelter. All of the trails start right behind the Interpretive center, witch is interesting in itself. Some great Civil War history, and facts and presentations about early life on the river. The lady working the interpretive center is related to General Forrest, and the park rangers are great. For a 52 year old part time hiker, like myself, you couldn't ask for anything more.

decent trail with some very nice views and great historical aspect. but the mosquitoes make it miserable. no amount of bug spray could save you