Established in 1951, the Henry R. Koen Experimental Forest (Koen) located in northern Arkansas is covered mostly in oak-hickory upland hardwood forest and oak-pine stands. Named for Henry R. Koen, forest supervisor of the Ozark National Forest in the first half of the 20th century, the experimental forest was established to develop scientific principles for forest management. At 720 acres, the Koen is the smallest of the 19 experimental forests managed by Southern Research Station (SRS). Forest Service facilities include an office, garage, and workshop. The Koen also features a handicapped accessible nature trail established in collaboration with several local civic organizations. Visitors from across the United States and around the world use the trail and picnic area. Watch a short video about the forest and the trail on YouTube. Through 1979, research at the Koen focused on upland hardwood forests. Researchers conducted numerous studies from the early 1940s to the late 1970s on the effect of stand structure on white oak stands, forest inventory sampling design, improvement harvesting, and small woodland management. Two long-term datasets resulted from research at the Koen: a study of red cedar that began in the 1940s and ran through the early 1960s, and a watershed study that ended in the late 1970s. Today, the Koen serves as the fieldwork base for SRS upland hardwood research across Arkansas. SRS research forester Martin Spetich manages the Koen. An integrated research program of 17 studies addresses upland hardwood forest dynamics and the development of both short- and long-term studies at three scales: individual tree, stand, and region. These studies encompass forest species restoration, quantitative silviculture, development of forest management methods, forest ecology, disturbance ecology, landscape ecology, climate change, forest biomass, and diversity of Arkansas upland hardwood forests.

Was dry. not running at all. but beautiful scenery.

The road to the parking area is extremely washed out. My F150 did fine, but you'll definitely need a 4x4 vehicle to reach the parking area. If your up for a walk, you can park on the side of hwy 74 and hike in. We visited on New Years Day but it was too icy and late in the day to venture to the bottom. Easy and short trail to the top of the falls. At the trailhead, take the first left before you cross the creek.

A short must see trail.

Idk how anyone found this it took me to someone's front yard on a very long driveway

This fall is one of the highest in the Buffalo River drainage definitely worth the trip during high water flow.

5 years ago

Nice hike in the spring.

Hammerschmidt fall trail is short and barely visible. But the waterfall is quite nice when you catch it after a good rain.