21 days ago

This is one of the more memorable hikes that I have done in the past few years. Getting to British Columbia, and then to the border of Valhalla Provincial Park was a considerable part of this "day hike". I did this as a day hike, and a considerably long day it was indeed. Were I to do it again....correction...WHEN I do it again, I will certainly bring camping gear, and press further into Valhalla Provincial Park.

I will not sugarcoat the realities of this trail. It is pretty tough. Much of the ascent to Gimli Ridge consists of considerably steep switchback trails. These are not the steepest switchbacks one might encounter hiking, but be prepared for a lot of walking up and down. This is not a Sunday afternoon stroll through the park with grandma and a picnic basket.

The views along the way are well worth the energy expended getting there. The view from the top is a worthwhile reward. I did it while there were large forest fires south of the border in Washington, Idaho, and Montana, so the sky was a bit smokey, but still clear enough to see the majestic view all around.

Getting There:

Heading north on HWY 6 after Crescent Valley, watch for a sign for 'Slocan Park' - a few KM later on the left will be Passmore Upper Rd, take this and cross a bridge. Continue straight, the road curves and a sign for Valhalla (40km) greets you. The km markers count down from this end, bear that in mind. Pavement ends soon after. Gravel road is 2wd appropriate, the last 2km of switchbacks to the trailhead have some rock debris, but no big deal.

Signs for Valhalla are clear at any major fork - continue along Little Slocan FSR. At about the 22km sign you will come across Little Slocan Lake FS Rec site - a great spot to free camp if doing Gimli or Gwillim lakes. A few meters later is a sign for Drinnon Pass, which is another hike in the park.

Continue straight until just after the 15km marker, take a sharp (signed) left to a T intersection that is unsigned, go left again. The km markers now start at 0.

At 5km stay right at the ambiguously placed sign. After 10km mark, stay left.

Again, most forks are signed unless the main road is obvious.

Easy stroll with the dogs. Played down at the riverbank for a while. Loved the furry trees!

A beautiful drive with so many places to stop and see along the way!!

scenic driving
1 month ago

A beautiful drive that I took for 9 days straight, and I loved every second of it! It's a highway that you won't mind being stuck behind truckers trying to make their climb in front of you. Don't forget to check out beautiful Yoho National Park, as it's on the way!

We drove this "trail" but we shared the road with several bikers, runners, and walkers. It's a nice, scenic drive perfect for an afternoon after a strenuous day of hiking.

Short, peaceful in the mornings

2 months ago

Very smooth elevation with a 2 to 2,5h up and down. Great views at the end

Very smooth elevation with a 2 to 2,5h up and down. Great views at the end

Very smooth elevation with a 2 to 2,5h up and down. Great views at the end

Wow! Gorgeous!!

scenic driving
2 months ago

Great drive. So much to see on Vancouver island. Love it even on a rainy day

Beautiful touristy spot

4 months ago

scenic driving
7 months ago

Alberta’s Icefields Parkway (Highway 93 North) is a world-class not to miss experience and one of Canada's national treasures. We traveled from Banff National Park through the heart of this Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks World Heritage Site, passing crystal blue turquoise mountain lakes, glaciers, waterfalls, and broad sweeping valleys. The parkway links Lake Louise with Jasper and you should expect to spend a minimum of three hours each way. One of the most beautiful journeys on the planet, this double-lane highway follows along the Continental Divide between towering rocky mountain peaks, and you might see big horn sheep, deer, black bears, and coyotes along the route. We saw a black bear run across the road in front of us. We also stopped at jaw-dropping Peyto Lake, where a short walk takes you to breath-taking views. At the Columbia Icefields just inside Jasper National Park is the Athabasca Glacier, where we walked on the glacier upwind against a driving, freezing sleet. You can also take a tour using a big snow cat further up onto the glacier and can purchase tickets at the visitor center. The Parkway is something you just can’t pass up if you visit Banff and the road is open. Enjoy!

It was an easy trail and a good way to spend a few hours

Nice place if you avoid the campers. Not easy stroll. Though there are some swampy crossing with only sticks and logs as your bridge. Don't be fooled by what may look like solid ground neat the end of those logs... I was, but luckily my hikers are waterproof lol.

If you go in spring, be prepared for lots of mud.

And while in the park, we did see a few bison.

My only beef is with smokers.. We picked up so many cigarette bugs on the tail.